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Developing Poster Presentations in the Social Sciences

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Title: Developing Poster Presentations in the Social Sciences Author: astrub Last modified by: Haner, Emily C Created Date: 7/8/2009 9:10:20 PM Document presentation ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Developing Poster Presentations in the Social Sciences


1
Developing Poster Presentations in the Social
Sciences
2
Introduction
Welcome to the online version of the Writing
Center's Developing a Poster Presentation in the
Social Sciences Workshop. Feel free to use the
arrow below to advance to the next slide, or you
can use the drop-down menu below to skip ahead.
3
Posters vs. Papers
Papers are designed to appeal to an editor of a
scholarly journal, and to meet the formal
organizational and informational requirements of
publication. Posters are designed to appeal to
peers and colleagues at conferences and/or public
displays, and to meet the organizational and
informational requirements of conferences and/or
public displays.
4
Posters vs. Papers
  • The audience of a paper is a person the audience
    of a poster is people.
  • A poster presentation allows for
    question-and-answer sessions, and the exchange of
    ideas and information regarding your research.
  • A paper presents all the information a poster
    presents the most important information.

5
Elements of Your Poster
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Methods
  • Data/Results
  • Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References

6
Title
  • Title
  • Catching, simple, able to be seen from 20 feet
    away.
  • Author(s)
  • Always use first names.
  • Use middle initials if space permits.
  • Institution
  • Institution and department.
  • City names and state names can be dropped.

7
Abstract
Follow APA guidelines. Identify what is being
studied, how you are studying it, and what your
variables are. Identify your hypothesis.
State your findings.
8
Introduction
  • Follow APA guidelines.
  • Less in-depth than an introduction for a paper.
  • Highlight and focus on
  • Questions raised and answered by previous
    research.
  • The question you are asking and why you are
    asking it.

9
Methods
  • Follow APA guidelines.
  • Present only the basics--your audience isn't
    trying to replicate your study at this moment,
    they just want to know basic experimental design.
  • Identify
  • The demographics of your subjects.
  • Measurement (repeated vs. independent).
  • Design (between vs. within).
  • Psychometric tests used in your experiment.

10
Data and Results
  • Follow APA guidelines.
  • Use graphic/visual elements
  • Tables
  • Charts
  • Pictures
  • Graphs

11
Data and Results
  • Include a descriptive label for each graphic.
    Below each graphic include a brief written
    description of what the graphic is and the
    interpretation of its data.

12
Conclusion
  • Follow APA guidelines.
  • Be concise and clear.
  • Highlight
  • What you found, and its importance.
  • Parallels and discrepancies with previous
    research and theory.
  • The direction of future research.

13
Acknowledgements
  • Acknowledge those professionals and research
    assistants outside of your research group that
    contributed to your study.
  • Be brief.
  • Note this section is not a requirement.

14
References
  • Follow APA format.
  • Use the same references as in your original
    research paper.

15
Organization and Layout
  • What does a poster look like?
  • A general guide to poster layout

16
Organization and Layout
  • Logistics
  • Find out the size regulations before you
    begin--the standard is usually 4' x 6'.
  • Font type for the body of your writing should be
    large enough to read from 6 feet away.

17
Organization and Layout
  • General Tips
  • Organize materials in either a columnar or
    counterclockwise fashion starting in the upper
    left corner.
  • Make section headings distinct from the body of
    your writing.
  • Use graphics, but only those that are necessary

18
Organization and Layout
  • Fonts
  • Use the same font style throughout the poster.
  • The title should be readable from 20 feet away.
  • The body of the writing should be readable from 6
    feet away.
  • San serif fonts are easier to read.
  • Add emphasis with bold, underline or
    color--italics are harder to read.

19
Aesthetic Issues
  • Color
  • Used effectively, color is an effective method of
    attracting people to your poster.
  • If you use color, stick to using a set number of
    colors in a consistent pattern.
  • Limit your color use to 2-3 colors.

20
Aesthetic Issues
  • Use contrasting colors for readability and a
    professional look.
  • Mount your printed material (text and graphics)
    on a colored background to create a border/frame.

21
Aesthetic Issues
  • Layout
  • Limited space doesn't mean you can cram things
    together.
  • Use a consistent spacing rule between each
    element of your poster.
  • Try to align corners along vertical and
    horizontal lines.

22
Dont Forget
  • You will be talking to others, and talking with
    others, about your poster. Bring a copy of your
    original paper for reference. Prepare handouts
    that highlight the key points of your research.
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