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Growing writers

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Use this as an introduction to the workshop. Discuss the schedule for the day and the theme of the workshop. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Growing writers


1
Growing writers Teaching Writing k-2
2
Can a child really become a better reader by
learning to write? Yes! Even with all of the
research to support the reading/writing
connection, writing still tends to be neglected
in the early years of education. This workshop
will address teaching strategies that support
writing throughout the day and that emphasize the
use of writing to strengthen early reading
skills. Teachers will walk away with a better
understanding of how to differentiate writing
instruction, as well as how to teach K-2 students
both the art and mechanics of writing.
3
Mary, Mary, quite contrary, how does your garden
grow?
Briseis-sunflower by Cliff Ross
4
Seeds by Jason Vance
How does a garden grow?
Seeds 2011 by Joni McFarland-Johnson
Jane the Gardener by Kathleen Tyler Conklin
A yellow watering can by Oatsy40
Sea and Sun by Serge Freeman
5
Seeds of Writers
  • Put the characteristics of writing in the order
    you think writing development progresses.

Seeds by Jason Vance

Seeds by Jason Vance
Seeds by Jason Vance
6
  • Writing Progression
  • Random scribbling - The starting point is any
    place on the page.
  • Controlled scribbling - Progression is from left
    to right.
  • Circular scribbling - Circles or ovals flow on
    the page.
  • Drawing - Pictures tell a story or convey a
    message.

7
  • Mock letters These can be personal or
    conventional symbols, such as a heart, star, or
    letters with extra lines.
  • Letter strings - These move from left to right
    and progress across the page as actual letters.
    They have no separations and no correlation with
    words or sounds.
  • Separated words-Groups of letters have space in
    between to resemble words.

8
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9
  • Writing Progression
  • Picture labeling - A picture's beginning sound is
    matched to a letter.
  • Awareness of environmental print - Environmental
    print, such as names on cubbies, is copied.
  • Transitional stage spelling or invented spelling
    - First letter of a word is used to represent the
    word.
  • Beginning and ending letters are used to
    represent a word.

10
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11
  • Writing Progression
  • Medial sound is a consonant.
  • Medial sound is in correct position, but the
    vowel is wrong.
  • A child hears beginning, medial, and ending
    letters.
  • Phrase writing develops.
  • Whole-sentence writing develops.
  • Transitional stage spelling (or invented
    spelling) is replaced by full, correct spelling
    of words.

12
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13
Implications for Teaching
Seeds by Jason Vance
In order to guide children through the stages of
writing development, it is imperative that our
instruction is individualized for each student.
We must recognize the growth that occurs and
nurture it.
14
Growth of a Writer
Seeds by Jason Vance
Keep on sowing your seed, for you never know
which will grow perhaps it all will.
Albert Einstein
  • First Grader
  • English Language Learner
  • January-April

15
How to build a snowman
16
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17
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18
Plant carrots in January, and youll never have
to eat carrots. Author Unknown
  • Teach letters and sounds
  • Write his/her name
  • Letters on highlighted lines
  • See themselves as writers
  • Use poetry and rhymes
  • Phonemic awareness activities
  • Read alouds

  • Non-Alphabetic
  • Pre-phonemic
  • Pre-literate

19
Plant carrots in January, and youll never
have to eat carrots.
Author Unknown
  • Letter-sound correspondence
  • Attend to initial sounds
  • Phonemic isolation and substitution activities
  • Letter boxes, finger spelling
  • Build confidence as writer

  • Pre-Alphabetic
  • Early Phonemic
  • Early Emergent
  • Letter-Name
  • Emergent

20
Plant carrots in January, and youll never have
to eat carrots. Author Unknown
  • Audience, purpose
  • Letter and word chunks
  • Spelling patterns
  • Full-alphabetic
  • Transitional

21
Plant carrots in January, and youll never have
to eat carrots. Author Unknown
  • Process
  • Genre
  • Conventions
  • Conventional
  • Fluency
  • Self-extending
  • Advanced

22
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23
SOIL
The golden rule of gardening is to pay attention
to the local conditions of weather and soil.
-Carol Williams
Seeds 2011 by Joni McFarland-Johnson
24
Think about it
Seeds 2011 by Joni McFarland-Johnson
  • classroom instruction writer soil seed

Garden tools by Duane Mind
25
Time
Seeds 2011 by Joni McFarland-Johnson
  • Teachers tell me theres no time to put writing
    at the center of the curriculum. There is if you
    value it.
  • -Regie Routman

26
Whats the big deal?
  • 1st-2nd grade Introduction
  • Students should write and read (or be read to) on
    a daily basis.

Garden tools by Duane Mind
27
What is Shared Writing?
Flower by Orange Leaf
  • Shared Writing is a process in which the teacher
    and students write together.
  • Generally, the teacher leads the students to
    share ideas and then records the ideas as the
    students watch.
  • Classrooms that Work, They Can All Read and
    Write Patricia Cunningham and Richard Allington.

28
Benefits of Shared Writing
  • Reinforces and supports the reading process
  • Makes it possible for all students to participate
  • Encourages close examination of text, words, and
    opinions of authors
  • Demonstrates the conventions of writing
    (spelling, punctuation, and grammar)
  • Provides reading texts that are relevant
  • and interesting to the children

Flower by Orange Leaf
29
Benefits of Shared Writing, cont.
  • Focuses on composing and leaves writing
    (transcribing) to the teacher
  • Helps students see possibilities they might not
    see on their own
  • Recognizes the child who may have a wealth of
    verbal story material but be unable to write it
    down
  • Gives both teacher and students confidence in
    their writing ability
  • Invitations Regie Routman

30
What is Interactive Writing?
  • Interactive Writing is a process in which the
    teacher and students write together.
  • Teacher and students share the pen.
  • (This is the difference between Shared and
    Interactive Writing.)

By Sunshine city
31
Benefits of Interactive Writing
  • Demonstrates and engages students in the writing
    process, including composition and construction
    of text
  • Creates readable text that can be used again
  • Helps children become aware of the structures and
    patterns of written
  • language

By Sunshine city
32
Benefits of Interactive Writing
  • Demonstrates and involves children in
    constructing words using letter-sound
    relationships and other strategies
  • Helps children learn to use the conventions of
    written language
  • Interactive Writing How Language and Literacy
    Come Together, K-2 Andrea McCarrier, Gay Su
    Pinnell Irene C. Fountas

By Sunshine city
33
(No Transcript)
34
Interactive Writing
35
What is Guided Writing?
  • Guided Writing takes place when students have
    time to write and the teacher is available for
    guidance.
  • It is the heart of the writing program and occurs
    only after students have had many opportunities
    to see writing demonstrated aloud.
  • Teachers are supportive rather than directive.

36
How Does Guided Writing Occur?
whole class journal writing small
groups letter writing one-on-one content
area writing story writing report
writing as part of writing workshop any
other form of authentic writing Invitations
Regie Routman
37
What is Independent Writing?
  • Independent Writing is when students are writing
    by themselves.
  • The student takes the responsibility for working
    out the challenges of the writing process.
  • Invitations Regie Routman

Flower by Orange Leaf
38
Benefits of Independent Writing
  • Builds fluency
  • Establishes the writing habit
  • Makes personal connections using their current
    knowledge
  • Explores meanings

Flower by Orange Leaf
39
Benefits of Independent Writing
  • Promotes critical thinking
  • Uses writing as a natural, pleasurable self
    chosen activity
  • Constructs words using current knowledge of
    letter-sound relationships and other strategies

40
The Affective Environment
Soil is the substance of transformation. -Carol
Williams
41
A yellow watering can by Oatsy40
Light Water
Sea and Sun by Serge Freeman
42
Reading Writing Connection
A yellow watering can by Oatsy40
Sea and Sun by Serge Freeman
43
The writer processes and manipulates the
letters, conventions, meanings, and structures of
language to produce a message for the reader to
understand.
Comprehension
The reader sees and processes the letters,
conventions, meanings, and structures of language
to interpret (or understand) what the writer is
trying to communicate.
Communication
44
Reading and Writing Processes
  • READING (Fig 19)
  • WRITING (Writing process)
  • Establish Purposes
  • Ask Questions
  • Monitor Comprehension
  • Adjust Comprehension
  • Make Inferences
  • Predict, visualize, draw conclusions
  • Summarize
  • Make Connections
  • Plan
  • Draft
  • Revise
  • Edit
  • Publish

45
Making the Connection
  • Mentor Text
  • Teaching skills in context
  • Teach function of conventions
  • Reading Response

46
The Gardener
Jane the Gardener by Kathleen Tyler Conklin
47
Jane the Gardener by Kathleen Tyler Conklin
What has become increasingly clear through
research that probes more deeply into the inner
workings of effective classrooms is that the
teacher is the crucial factor in the classroom.
Gambrell, L.B., Malloy, J.A., Mazzoni, S.A.
(2007)
48
A Tale of Two Gardeners
Read both stories. What similarities and
differences do you notice between the two
classrooms?
Stacey
Hannah
49
How does your garden grow?
  • Fostering Independence
  • Foster Dependence
  • Write every single day
  • Choose their own topics
  • Receive differentiated instruction
  • Examine writing to develop a vision of success
  • Learn from mentor texts
  • Focus on one or two goals at a time
  • Benefit from the rewards of authentic audience
  • Revise
  • Write sporadically
  • Given prompts or topics
  • One-size-fits-all approach
  • Focus on weaknesses fix it approach
  • No reading/writing connection
  • All or nothing
  • Contrived assignments
  • Product over process

50

51
References
  • Dorn, L.J. Soffos, C. (2001). Scaffolding Young
    Writers A Writers Workshop Approach. Portland,
    Maine Stenhouse.
  • Ehmann, S. Gayer, K. (2009). I Can Write Like
    That! A Guide To Mentor Texts and Craft Studies
    for Writers Workshop, K-6. Newark, Delaware
    International Reading Association.
  • Gentry, J. (2005). INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR
    EMERGING WRITERS AND SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS AT
    KINDERGARTEN AND GRADE 1 LEVELS. Reading
    Writing Quarterly, 21(2), 113-134.
    doi10.1080/10573560590915932.
  • Jacobson, J. (2010). No More Im Done! Fostering
    Independent Writers in the Primary Grades.
    Portland, Maine Stenhouse.
  • Jasmine, J., Weiner, W. (2007). The Effects of
    Writing Workshop on Abilities of First Grade
    Students to Become Confident and Independent
    Writers. Early Childhood Education Journal,
    35(2), 131-139. doi10.1007/s10643-007-0186-3.
  • Lamme, L., Danling, F., Johnson, J., Savage, D.
    (2002). Helping Kindergarten Writers Move Toward
    Independence. Early Childhood Education Journal,
    30(2), 73-79. Retrieved from Professional
    Development Collection database.
  • Mermelstein, L.(2006). Reading/Writing
    Connections in the k-2 Classroom Find the
    Clarity and Then Blur The Lines. New York, NY
    Pearson Education.
  • Routman, R. (2005). Writing Essentials Raising
    Expectations and Results While Simplifying
    Teaching. Portsmouth, NH Heinemann.
  • Schulze, A.(2006) . Helping Children Become
    Readers Through Writing A Guide to Writing
    Workshop in Kindergarten. Newark, DE
    International Reading Association.
  • Vanderburg, R. (2006). Reviewing Research on
    Teaching Writing Based on Vygotsky's Theories
    What We Can Learn. Reading Writing Quarterly,
    22(4), 375-393. doi10.1080/10573560500455778.

52
Literacy Team
Robyn Fox, M.Ed, MRT ELA Program Coordinator robyn.fox_at_region10.org 972-348-1444 Sharon Runge, M.Ed. K - 12 Consultant specalizing in Middle / High School sharon.runge_at_region10.org 972-348-1514
Virginia Gonzalez, M.Ed., LDT, CALT State Dyslexia Consultantvirginia.gonzalez_at_region10.org 972-348-1410 Nancy McGruder, M.Ed. K - 12 Consultant specializing in Intermediate / Middle School nancy.mcgruder_at_region10.org 972-348-1404
Gina Mitchell, MLA, LDT, CALT Regional Dyslexia Consultantgina.mitchell_at_region10.org972-348-1454 Terry Roper, M.L.S. K - 12 Consultant specializing in Library Science terry.roper_at_region10.org 972-348-1414
Kay Shurtleff, M.A. K - 12 Consultant specializing in Middle / High School kay.shurtleff_at_region10.org 972-348-1756 Vicki Reynolds, M.Ed. K - 12 Consultant specializing in Primary/Elementary School vicki.reynolds_at_region10.org 972-348-1520
53
It is the policy of Region 10 Education Service
Center not to discriminate on the basis of race,
color, national origin, sex or handicap in its
vocational programs, services or activities as
required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of
1964, as amended Title IX of the Educational
Amendments of 1972 and Section 503 and 504 of
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.
Region 10 Education Service Center will take
steps to ensure that lack of English language
skills will not be a barrier to admission and
participation in all educational programs and
services.
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