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Leadership Essentials

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Title: Leadership Essentials


1
Leadership Essentialsfor the Essential Elements 
2
Overview
  • Traditional Leadership
  • Instructional Leadership
  • Additional Demands at the Middle Level
  • Leadership that Works
  • How to Get It All Done
  • Applications and Examples

3
What does aleader look like?
  • Traditional Leadership
  • Instructional Leadership
  • Middle Level Leadership
  • Leadership that Works

4
Getting things going...
  • Warm-up activity Four squares
  • Consensograms
  • Leadership Tools

5
Traditional Leadership
  • Task On the roll-paper, draw a picture of the
    traditional leader

6
Instructional Leadership
  • Choose an article from the reader, BUT NOT
    BALANCED LEADERSHIP
  • Read it, discuss
  • Group synthesizes individual articles using
    sticky notes
  • Update your leader picture

7
The Essential Elements(of Standards-Focused
MiddleLevel Schools and Programs)
8
Essential Element 1 Philosophy and Mission
  • A philosophy and mission that reflect the
    intellectual and developmental needs and
    characteristics of young adolescents.

9
Essential Element 1 Philosophy and Mission
Status quo and inertia
10
Essential Element 1 Philosophy and Mission
An dually-articulated vision for the future
11
Essential Element 1 Philosophy and Mission
An dually-articulated vision for the future
Status quo and inertia
12
Essential Element 2 Educational Program
  • An educational program that is comprehensive,
    challenging, purposeful, integrated, and
    standards-based.

13
Essential Element 2 Educational Program
Standards incidentalism or Standards-referenced
14
Essential Element 2 Educational Program
Beginning with the End in Mind all the time.
15
Essential Element 2 Educational Program
Standards incidentalism or Standards-referenced
Beginning with the End in Mind all the time.
16
Essential Element 3 Organization and Structure
  • An organization and structure that support both
    academic excellence and personal development.

17
Essential Element 3 Organization and Structure
Junior High School
18
Essential Element 3 Organization and Structure
Deliberate and intentional design
19
Essential Element 3 Organization and Structure
Deliberate and intentional design
Junior High School
20
Essential Element 4 Classroom Instruction
  • Classroom instruction appropriate to the needs
    and characteristics of young adolescents provided
    by skilled and knowledgeable teachers.

21
Essential Element 4 Classroom Instruction
Traditional Teaching
22
Essential Element 4 Classroom Instruction
Best Practice and Research-based Learning
23
Essential Element 4 Classroom Instruction
Best Practice and Research-based Learning
Traditional Teaching
24
Essential Element 5 Educational Leadership
  • Strong educational leadership and a building
    administration that encourages, facilitates, and
    sustains involvement, participation, and
    partnerships.

25
Essential Element 5 Educational Leadership
Mis-matched Management
26
Essential Element 5 Educational Leadership
Effective Leadership and Situational Match
27
Essential Element 5 Educational Leadership
Effective Leadership and Situational Match
Mis-matched Management
28
Essential Element 6 A Network of Academic and
Personal Support
  • A network of academic and personal support
    available for students.

29
Essential Element 6 A Network of Academic and
Personal Support
Haphazard Programs and reliance on AIS
30
Essential Element 6 A Network of Academic and
Personal Support
Deliberate and Collaborative Network
31
Essential Element 6 A Network of Academic and
Personal Support
Haphazard Programs and reliance on AIS
Deliberate and Collaborative Network
32
Essential Element 7 Professional Training and
Staff Development
  • Professional training and staff development that
    are ongoing, planned, purposeful, and
    collaborated.

33
Essential Element 7 Professional Training and
Staff Development
Disconnected, one-shot, wants-based staff
development
34
Essential Element 7 Professional Training and
Staff Development
Aligned and Distributed Professional Learning
35
Essential Element 7 Professional Training and
Staff Development
Disconnected, one-shot, wants-based staff
development
Aligned and Distributed Professional Learning
36
Essential Elements Activity
  • Task make a poster advertisement
  • Take a walking tour of essential elements
  • Update your leader picture

37
Essential Elements Tools
  • The Elements
  • The Research
  • The rubrics
  • The pamphlets
  • nysmsa.org

38
What does aleader look like?
  • Traditional Leadership
  • Instructional Leadership
  • Middle Level Leadership
  • Leadership that Works

39
Lunch
40
Classroom Instruction That Works
  • Marzano,
  • Pickering,
  • Pollock

41
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Identifying Similarities and Differences
  • Comparing looking at similarities and
    differences between or among things
  • Graphic organizers
  • Comparison matrix
  • Classifying grouping things that are alike on
    the basis if these characteristics
  • Venn diagrams and other graphic organizers
  • Creating metaphors identifying a general or
    basis pattern in a specific topic, then finding
    another topic that appears to be different but
    has the same general pattern
  • See Starship example

42
Identifying Similarities and Differences
  • Creating analogies identifying relationships
    between pairs of concepts, relationships
  • Oxygen is to humans as carbon dioxide is to
    plants
  • Eighty is to eight as dime is to ______
  • Thermometer is to temperature as odometer is to
    distance

43
Metaphor Example
  • Two science students were standing in front of
    the class pointing to the diagram of the Starship
    Enterprise (from Star Trek) as they presented
    their project. Their assignment was to identify
    the major structures of a cell and describe the
    function of each. They were then to restate the
    information in more general, abstract terms, and
    finally, to identify another system that is
    similar to the cell, at an abstract level. These
    two students had selected the Enterprise as the
    second element of the metaphor, and identified
    the following abstract pattern connecting a cell
    with the starship.
  • Cell General,Abstract Enterprise
  • Nucleus Part that runs the The bridge
  • system_______________________
  • Selectively Part that keeps out
    Transporter
  • Permeable bad things and lets in Room
  • Membrane the good
  • In a detailed and articulate way, students
    described how each aspect of the cell was like a
    feature of the Enterprise

44
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Summarizing and Note Taking
  • To effectively summarize, students must delete
    some information (trivial, redundant
    information), substitute some information (
    super ordinate terms such as flowers, for a
    listing of flowers), and keep some information
  • Frame questions to assist students in summarizing
  • To practice summarizing in the classroom ask
    students to verbally summarize silent or oral
    reading, utilize reciprocal teaching with a
    student leader ( questioning, clarifying,
    predicting.)
  • Note Taking
  • Should not be verbatim
  • Considered a work in progress
  • Used as study guides
  • Teach various note taking strategies webbing,
    outline format, etc.
  • The more notes that are taken, the better
  • Teach various note taking strategies webbing,
    outline format, etc.

45
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition
  • Teach about effort share personal examples
  • Have students track their effort and achievement
  • (see achievement rubric)
  • Deliver effective praise citing specifics of the
    accomplishment, for note worthy effort or
    success in difficult tasks
  • Personalize recognition
  • Pause, Prompt, and Praise

46
Effort Achievement Rubric
47
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Homework and Practice
  • The amount of homework assigned should be
    different from elementary to middle to high
    school.
  • High School 24 percentile points
  • Middle School 12 percentile points
  • Elementary School 6 percentile points
  • The purpose of homework should be identified and
    articulated. Is it practice, to prepare new
    information, or to elaborate on information that
    has been introduced?
  • Parent involvement in homework should be kept to
    a minimum
  • If homework is assigned, it should be commented
    on. Vary approaches in providing feedback on
    homework

48
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Nonlinguistic Representations (Creating graphic
    representations)
  • Making physical models
  • Generating metal pictures
  • Drawing pictures and pictographs
  • Engaging in kinesthetic activity
  • (I..to measure degrees, represent angles, etc.).e
    body math
  • Using multiple means to help students visualize
    the content (various organizers to show
    concepts, effects, generalizations, episodes,
    etc.)

49
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Organizing groups based on ability levels should
    be done sparingly
  • Cooperative Learning groups should be kept small
    in size (3-4)
  • Cooperative learning should be applied
    consistently and systematically, but not overused
  • Five defining elements
  • Positive interdependence (sink or swim together)
  • Face to face promotive interaction (helping each
    other learn, applauding success and efforts)
  • Individual Group accountability ( each of us
    must to contribute to the group achieving its
    goals)
  • Interpersonal and Small group skills
    (communication, trust, leadership,
    decision-making, conflict resolution)
  • Group processing (reflecting on how well the team
    is functioning and how o function better

50
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback
  • Goal setting is important. Instructional goals
    should narrow what students focus on. (I.e goal
    might be that students understand how a cell
    functions.)
  • Instructional goals should not be too specific
    but should include performance, conditions,
    criterion)
  • Students should be encouraged to personalize the
    teachers goals.
  • Feedback
  • Should be corrective in nature
  • Should be timely
  • Should be specific to a criterion
  • Students can effectively provide some of their
    own feedback

51
Classroom Instruction That Works(Marzano,
Pickering, Pollock) Research Based Strategies
for Improving Student Achievement
  • Questions, Cues, and Advance Organizers
  • Help students organize and use what they already
    know about a topic
  • Are at the heart of classroom practice
    generally accounts for 80 of what goes on in
    classrooms
  • Should focus on what is important, rather than
    unusual
  • Higher level questions produce deeper learning
    Ask the question before the instruction to frame
    a mental set.
  • Advance organizer could be skimming, narrative
    (story related to the learning), expository
    (describes the content to which students will be
    exposed), or graphic.

52
Instructional Leadership
Susan Allen Asst. Superintendent for
Instruction Hilton Central School District 225
West Avenue Hilton, New York 14468 sallen_at_hilton.k
12.ny.us
53
Instructional Leadership
  • Primary Areas of Focus
  • 90/90/90 Schools Research Doug Reeves
  • Ruby Payne strategies
  • Balanced Leadership Waters, Marzano, McNulty

54
The 90/90/90 Schools
  • From Accountability in Action by Douglas Reeves

55
What Are They?
  • Inner-city urban schools, suburban schools, and
    rural schools
  • 228 buildings and more than 130,000 students
  • More than 90 of students eligible for free and
    reduced lunch
  • More than 90 from ethnic minorities

56
Common Characteristics of High Achievement
Schools
  • Focus on Academic Achievement
  • Clear curriculum choices
  • Frequent assessment of student
  • progress and multiple opportunities for
    improvement
  • Emphasis on writing
  • External scoring

57
Focus on Academic Achievement
  • Laser-like focus
  • Displays of exemplary student work in trophy
    cases, etc.
  • Charts, graphs, and tables all over the school
    displaying student achievement.
  • Obvious to all that academic performance is
    highly prized.
  • Comprehensive accountability system
  • School focus on a few indicators of improvement
  • How you finish is what counts
  • Substantial interventions for students who were
    deficient in reading and writing.

58
Curriculum Choices
  • More time spent on core subjects of reading,
    writing and mathematics demonstrated student
    achievement improvement in other content areas.

59
Frequent Assessment of Student Progress with
Multiple Opportunities for Improvement
  • Student performance that is less than proficient
    is followed by multiple opportunities to improve.
  • Weekly assessments
  • Constructed and administered by classroom
    teachers
  • You can do better next week
  • Active coaching vs. final evaluation model

60
Emphasis on Writing
  • High emphasis on informative writing
  • Single scoring guide to evaluate every piece of
    written work used across content areas.
  • No compromises on expectations for quality
  • Association between writing and performance in
    other academic disciplines was striking

61
External Scoring
  • Common assessment practices that were reinforced
    through exchange of student papers
  • Teacher to teacher
  • Building to building
  • Principal as evaluator
  • Need uniform basis on which to evaluate student
    work

62
What are we doing now?What could we be doing?
  • Techniques are replicable
  • Techniques are consistent-focus is clear
  • Techniques are persistent more than 90 of the
    students involved in these studies continue to
    meet or exceed state
  • standards.

63
What We Are Doing
  • Focusing on one area at each cabinet meeting
    discussions on what we are currently doing and
    what we should be doing
  • Principals are holding discussions with faculty
    at department meetings and/or faculty meetings

64
Ruby Payne Strategies
65
Helping Individual Students
  • Building administrators are working with
    individual teachers, using a grid-like format to
    identify where each child is academically on
    major assessments. A plan is then developed to
    move each child up by at least one quartile by
    the end of the year.

66
Disabled ESL Transfer students White males
75-100 (4th quartile) Greg Mark Ed Tom
50-74 (3rd quartile) George Marissa Lydia
25-49 (2nd quartile) James Karen Joe Ken
0-24 (1st quartile) Mary Tim Maria Dave Steve Brian Mike
67
Balanced Leadership
  • What 30 years of research tells us about the
    effect of leadership on student achievement

68
ASSUMPTIONS
  1. We need to get the most possible out of our
    schools.
  2. In light of the resource, social, political, and
    design realities facing our schools and their
    leaders, our schools (the current model of
    schooling in the USA) are not likely to meet the
    expectation that no child is left behind.
  3. We need educational leaders who can initiate and
    sustain the improvement efforts required to
    accomplish 1, and who are prepared to deal with
    the 2nd order changes implied by 2.

69
Factors Influencing Achievement
  1. Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum
  2. Challenging Goals and Effective Feedback
  3. Parent and Community Involvement
  4. Safe and Orderly Environment
  5. Collegiality and Professionalism

School
6. Instructional Strategies 7. Classroom
Management 8. Classroom Curriculum Design
Teacher
9. Home Environment 10. Learning
Intelligence/Background Knowledge 11. Motivation
Student
70
A Composite Model of the Research on School and
Teacher Effectiveness
School and Teacher Combinations Percentile Score Upon Entering Percentile Score Upon Leaving 2 Years Later
Average School Average Teacher 50th 50th
Highly Ineffective School Highly Ineffective Teacher 50th 3rd
Highly Effective School Highly Ineffective Teacher 50th 37th
Highly Ineffective School Highly Effective Teacher 50th 63rd
Highly Effective School Highly Effective Teacher 50th 92nd
Highly Effective School Average Teacher 50th 78th
71
OPERATIONAL DEFINITIONS
LEADERS
Effective leaders influence individuals and
organizations. At the individual level, leaders
support learning that leads to individual and
organizational goals. At the organizational
level, leaders develop a shared vision and broad
goals. Leaders accept responsibility for
achieving results and create the necessary
environments that contribute to individual and
organizational success.
72
Background of McRELs Study of Leadership
  • 3000 Dissertation citations
  • 2000 Other study citations
  • 70 Studies met our criteria for inclusion
  • Quantitative data
  • Achievement as the dependent variable
  • Standardized scores
  • Teacher perceptions
  • 80 of these 70 studies found no significant
    relationship

73
The Benefit of Meta-Analysis
In the 70 studies
  • 2894 schools
  • 1.1 million students
  • 14,000 teachers

74
The average correlation between principal
leadership behavior and school achievement is .25
which means A one standard deviation increase
in principal leadership is associated with a 10
percentile point gain in school achievement.
75
Characteristics of 1st Order Change
  • An extension of the past
  • Within existing paradigms
  • Consistent with prevailing norms and values
  • Focused
  • Bounded
  • Linear
  • Marginal
  • Problem and solution-oriented
  • Implemented by experts

76
Characteristics of 2nd Order Change
  • A break with the past
  • Outside of existing paradigms
  • Conflicted with prevailing norms and values
  • A disturbance to every element and aspects of a
    system
  • Emergent
  • Unbounded
  • Nonlinear
  • Neither problem nor solution oriented
  • Implement by community
  • Complex

77
Leadership for Incremental Change
  • Emphasize relationships
  • Establish strong lines of communication
  • Be an advocate for the school
  • Provide resources
  • Maintain visibility
  • Protect teachers from distractions
  • Create culture of collaboration
  • Look for and celebrate successes

78
Leadership for 2nd Order Change
  • Shake up the status quo
  • Hold everyones feet to the fire
  • Propose new ideas
  • Operate from strong beliefs
  • Tolerate ambiguity and dissent
  • Talk research and theory
  • Create explicit goals for change
  • Define success in terms of goals

79
Principal Characteristics and Behaviors
Average r and 95 Confidence Intervals
Characteristic/ Behavior Ave r N (Schools) N (Studies) 95 (CI)
Communication .23 245 10 (.10 to .30)
Outreach .28 478 14 (.19 to .35)
Input .30 504 13 (.21 to .38)
Relationship .19 497 12 (.10 to .24)
Affirmation .25 345 7 (.14 to .35)
CIA .16 636 19 (.08 to .24)
Contingent Reward .15 420 7 (.05 to .24)
Focus .24 1109 30 (.18 to .29)
Knowledge of CIA .24 327 8 (.13 to .35)
Visibility .16 432 11 (.06 to .25)
80
Principal Characteristics and Behaviors
Average r and 95 Confidence Intervals
Characteristic/ Behavior Ave r N (Schools) N (Studies) 95 (CI)
Change Agent .30 479 7 (.22 to .38)
Optimizer .20 444 9 (.11 to .29)
Situational Awareness .33 91 5 (.11 to .51)
Intellectual Stimulation .32 321 5 (.22 to .42)
Ideas/Beliefs .25 526 8 (.17 to .33)
Monitor/Evaluate .28 1071 30 (.23 to .34)
Flexibility .22 151 2 (.05 to .37)
Culture .29 709 13 (.23 to .37)
Order .26 456 17 (.17 to .35)
Discipline .24 397 10 (.14 to .33)
Resources .26 570 17 (.18 to .34)
81
Balancing Leadership for Change
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Culture (.29) - Promotes cooperation among staff - Promotes a sense of well being - Promotes cohesion among staff - Develops shared understanding of purpose - Develops a shared vision of what the school could be like
Order (.26) - Provides and enforces clear structure, rules and procedures for students - Provides and enforces clear structure, rules and procedures for staff - Establishes routines regarding the running of the school that staff understand and follow
82
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Discipline (.24) - Protects instructional time from interruptions - Protects/shelters teachers from distractions
Resources (.26) - Ensures that teachers have necessary materials and equipment - Ensure that teachers have necessary staff development opportunities that directly enhance their teaching
Curriculum Instruction Assessment (.16) - Is involved in helping teachers design Curricular activities - Is involved with teachers to address instructional issues in their classrooms - Is involved with teachers to address assessment issues
83
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Focus (.24) - Establishes high concrete goals and expectations that all students meet them - Establishes concrete goals for all curriculum, instruction and assessment. - Establishes concrete goals for the general functioning of the school - Continually keeps attention on established goals
Knowledge of CIA (.24) - Is knowledgeable about instructional practice - Is knowledgeable about assessment Practices - Provides conceptual guidance for teachers regarding effective classroom practice
Visibility (.16) - Makes systematic and frequent visits to classrooms - Maintains high visibility around the school - Has frequent contact with students
84
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Contingent Rewards (.15) - Recognizes individuals who excel - Uses performance vs. seniority as the primary criterion for reward and advancement - Uses hard work and results as the basis for reward and recognition
Communication (.23) - Is easily accessible to teachers - Develops effective means for teachers to communicate with one another - Maintains open and effective lines of Communication with staff
Outreach (.28) - Assures that the school is in compliance with district and state mandates - Advocates on behalf of the school in the community - Advocates for the school with parents of students - Ensures that the central office is aware of the schools accomplishments
85
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Input (.30) - Provides opportunity for input on all important decisions - Provides opportunities for staff to be involved in developing school policies - Uses a leadership team in decision making
Affirmation(.25) - Systematically and fairly recognizes and celebrates accomplishments of teachers - Systematically and fairly recognizes and celebrates accomplishments of students - Systematically acknowledges failures and celebrates accomplishments of the school
Relationships (.19) - Remains aware of personal needs of teachers - Maintains personal relationships with teachers - Is informed about significant personal issues within lives of staff - Acknowledges significant events in the lives of staff
86
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Change Agent (.30) - Consistently challenges the status quo - Is comfortable with leading change initiatives with uncertain outcomes - Systematically considers new and better ways of doing things
Optimizer(.20) - Inspires teachers to accomplish things that might seem beyond their grasp - Portrays a positive attitude about the ability of the staff to accomplish substantial things - Is a driving force behind major initiatives
Ideals/Beliefs (.25) - Holds strong professional beliefs about schools, teaching and learning - Shares beliefs about schooling, teachers and learning with staff and parents - demonstrates behaviors that are consistent With belief
87
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Monitors/Evaluates (.28) - Monitors and evaluates the effectiveness of Curriculum, instruction and assessment
Flexibility (.22) - Is comfortable with major changes in how things are done - Encourages people to express opinions contrary to those in authority - Adapts leadership style to needs of specific situation - Can be directive or non-directive as the situation warrants
Situational Awareness (.33) - Is aware of informal groups and relationships among staff of the school - Is aware of issues in the school that have not surfaced but could create discord - Can predict what could go wrong from day to day
88
Leadership responsibilities and Effect Sizes (ES) 1st Order 2nd Order
Intellectual Stimulation(.32) - Keeps informed about current research and theory regarding effective schooling - Continually exposes staff to cutting edge ideas about how to be effective - Systematically engages staff in discussions about current research and theory - Continually involves the staff in reading articles and books about effective practices


89
Closure
  • What does a leader look like?
  • What are the barriers to leadership?
  • Examples of Strategies
  • Action Planning

90
ProfessionalLearningCommunity
91
If schools want to enhance their capacity to
boost student learning, they should work on
building a collaborative culture
92
When groups, rather than individuals, are seen as
the main units for implementing curriculum,
instruction, and assessment, they facilitate
development of shared purposes for student
learning and collective responsibility to achieve
it. -Fred Newmann
93
ProfessionalLearningCommunity
94
PLC Characteristic 1 Shared Mission Vision
  • Effective mission and vision provides direction
    to guide daily operations and improvement
    initiatives.

95
PLC Characteristic 1 Shared Mission Vision
Status quo and inertia
96
PLC Characteristic 1 Shared Mission Vision
An articulated vision for the future
97
PLC Characteristic 1 Shared Mission Vision
An articulated vision for the future
Status quo and inertia
98
PLC Characteristic 1 Shared Mission Vision
An articulated vision for the future
Status quo and inertia
99
PLC Characteristic 2 Collective Inquiry
  • The process of searching for answers enables team
    members to view the world differently and to make
    significant changes in the school culture.

100
PLC Characteristic 2 Collective Inquiry
Whatever it is its good enough.
101
PLC Characteristic 2 Collective Inquiry
The deep learning cycle is engrained
102
PLC Characteristic 2 Collective Inquiry
The deep learning cycle is engrained
Whatever it is its good enough.
103
PLC Characteristic 2 Collective Inquiry
The deep learning cycle is engrained
Whatever it is its good enough.
104
PLC Characteristic 3 Collaborative Teams
  • The basic structure of a PLC is a group of
    collaborative teams that share a common purpose.

105
PLC Characteristic 3 Collaborative Teams
Individual classrooms united by a common parking
lot
106
PLC Characteristic 3 Collaborative Teams
Learning teams for everything
107
PLC Characteristic 3 Collaborative Teams
Individual classrooms united by a common parking
lot
Learning teams for everything
108
PLC Characteristic 3 Collaborative Teams
Individual classrooms united by a common parking
lot
Learning teams for everything
109
PLC Characteristic 4 Action Orientation
  • Learning always occurs in a context of action
    engagement and experience are the best teachers.

110
PLC Characteristic 4 Action Orientation
This too shall pass.
111
PLC Characteristic 4 Action Orientation
Intolerance for inaction willingness to
experiment
112
PLC Characteristic 4 Action Orientation
Intolerance for inaction willingness to
experiment
This too shall pass.
113
PLC Characteristic 4 Action Orientation
Intolerance for inaction willingness to
experiment
This too shall pass.
114
PLC Characteristic 5 Continuous Improvement
  • A persistent discomfort with the status quo and a
    constant search for a better way.

115
PLC Characteristic 5 Continuous Improvement
Just another directive.
116
PLC Characteristic 5 Continuous Improvement
A way of life innovation and experimentation
forever.
117
PLC Characteristic 5 Continuous Improvement
A way of life innovation and experimentation
forever.
Just another directive.
118
PLC Characteristic 5 Continuous Improvement
A way of life innovation and experimentation
forever.
Just another directive.
119
PLC Characteristic 6 A Results Orientation
  • Efforts are based on an assessment of the results
    rather than intentions.

120
PLC Characteristic 6 A Results Orientation
One initiative to the next.
121
PLC Characteristic 6 A Results Orientation
Focus on results rather than just intentions.
122
PLC Characteristic 6 A Results Orientation
Focus on results rather than just intentions.
One initiative to the next.
123
PLC Characteristic 6 A Results Orientation
Focus on results rather than just intentions.
One initiative to the next.
124
ProfessionalLearningCommunity
125
Leadership Essentialsfor the Essential Elements 
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