Progressive Era (1901-1914) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Progressive Era (1901-1914) PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 78222e-Njc3N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Progressive Era (1901-1914)

Description:

Progressive Era (1901-1914) Chapter 28 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:130
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 55
Provided by: AmaZ99
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Progressive Era (1901-1914)


1
Progressive Era (1901-1914)
  • Chapter 28

2
Objective 1
  • Discuss the origins and nature of the progressive
    movement.

3
Objective 2
  • Examine the responses of the Progressives
    associated with industrialization and
    urbanization as seen in
  • Settlement house movement
  • Muckraker journalism
  • Increased regulation
  • Reform of government.

4
Objective 3
  • Explain the critical role that women played in
    progressive social reform.

5
The Culture WarsThe Pendulum of Right v. Left
ChristianEvangelicalMovement
2nd Great Awakening
Social Gospel
1920s Revivalism
1950sRevivalism
CONSERVATIVE REVOLUTION
CIVILWAR
Antebellum Reforms1810s-1850s
Progressivism1890s-1920
New Deal1930s-1940s
Great Society1960s SocialMovements
Populism1870s-1890s
6
Progressivism
  • Often called the first modern reform movement
  • Influenced by Social Gospel Movement
  • Upset over laissez-faire idealists and corruption
    of government and business
  • Driven by the forgotten middle class stuck
    between corporations and working class
  • Progressives in all parties and all levels of
    government

7
PROGRESSIVISM
CivilRights
Suffragettes
Muckrackers
Temperance
Labor Unions
MidclassWomen
Environmentalists
Popul ists
8
Environmentalism
  • Your environment, not your heredity, was most
    important factor in human development
  • Improve environmentimprove life
  • Better schools, homes, etc. better society
  • Teach middle class values to everyone

9
Strong Government
  • Progressives wanted strong government regulation
  • Government should be agents of human welfare
  • Government should fight trusts
  • Return power to the people and out of hands of
    corrupt

10
Progressive Government Reform
  • 17th Amendment (1913) Direct election of
    Senators
  • Referendum
  • Recall
  • Election spending reform
  • Pro-suffrage women fight corruption
  • Increase social spending to help poor
  • Keep them from voting Socialist

11
Urban Reform
  • Rapid urbanization continued to cause problems
  • Immigration seemed to threaten American way of
    life to Progressives
  • Progressives try to wrestle control from Party
    Bosses
  • Non-partisan commissioners
  • City Manager system
  • Progressives, like Robert LaFollette began to
    shift control away from corporations back to
    government (through regulation)

12
Progressive Muckrakers
  • Journalists drove Progressivism
  • Given nickname by TR due to their investigative
    zeal
  • Competed for audiences
  • American, McClures, Cosmo
  • Revolutionized journalism and exposed corruption

13
Major Muckraker Works
  • David Phillips The Treason of the Senate
  • Upton Sinclair The Jungle
  • Jacob Riis How the Other Half Lives
  • Ida Tarbells expose of John D. Rockefeller

14
Child Labor
  • Florence Kelley Illinois first chief factory
    inspector and advocate for improved factor
    conditions
  • 1905-1907 2/3 of states passed child labor law
  • 1912 Childrens Bureau created by Dept. of Labor
  • Success limited because wanted cheap labor and
    poor needed to work
  • Compulsory school attendance laws increase

15
Working Women
  • Muller v. Oregon Supreme Court ruled in favor of
    10-hr. work day for women
  • Took some control of working conditions away from
    employer
  • Needed to protect women from disease and danger
  • Progressives also argued women were weaker than
    men and needed extra protection

16
Womens Suffrage
  • Progressives were pro-womens suffrage
  • Needed to offset immigrant vote, protect family,
    social reform
  • Will gain suffrage in 1920 (19th Amendment)

17
Progressives and Birth Control
  • Comstock Law (1873)
  • Margaret Sanger opened information centers and
    fled country
  • Returned in 1921 to found American Birth Control
    League (later Planned Parenthood)

18
More Women
  • Jane Addams continues settlement house movement
  • Exposed women to the plight of impoverished,
    working conditions, etc.
  • Women form activist organizations and womens
    clubs such as Womens Trade Union League and
    National Consumers League
  • Extension of womans place in the home, not a
    rejection of this concept

19
Home and School
  • Better housing and schools would transform lives
    of poor
  • Jacob Riis
  • John Dewey Better schoolsbetter citizens

20
Prohibition
  • Progressives opposed alcohol
  • It contradicted concept of healthy, educated
    citizens (some called it sin)
  • Womens Christian Temperance Union
  • Anti-Saloon League
  • 1906-1912 7 States passed temperance laws
  • By WWI 50 of U.S. territory was dry (usually
    rural areas)
  • 1917 18th Amendment--full Prohibition

21
Brothels and Movie Houses
  • Progressives believed dance halls and movie
    houses threatened the morals of people
    (especially women)
  • Linked prostitution to movie houses and saloons
  • Mann Act (1910) Prohibited the interstate
    transportation of women for immoral purposes
  • First motion picture 1889
  • First full length motion picture Birth of a
    Nation--1915

22
Progressives and Workers
  • Progressives sympathized with industrial workers
    but had little understanding of their plight
  • Supported unions attempt to improve working
    conditions but opposed strikes
  • Pushed legislation to protect workers

23
Scientific Management
  • Many innovations, high supply of workers,
    laissez-faire government meant low pay, unsafe
    working conditions, lack of union success
  • Factories stressed efficiency and profit
  • Frederick Taylor Scientific management
  • Progressives supported efficiency

24
Union Movements
  • Unions were against Scientific management because
    it reduced importance of worker
  • 2 million unionized by 1904 (75 in AFL)
  • AFL represented skilled craftsmen and ignored
    unskilled and women
  • Companies continued to win battles in early 20th
    c.

25
Danbury Hatters Case (1908)
  • Supreme Court stated that unions were subject to
    the Sherman Anti-Trust Act
  • Unions could be held financially liable to
    businesses during a strike
  • Number of strikes dip
  • Progressives did little to help unions but did
    help workers
  • Tried to improve working conditions

26
Women in Workplace
  • 5 million by 1900, 8.5 million by 1920
  • Ignored by most unions (1.5 in unions in 1920)
  • Womens Trade Union League founded in 1903

27
Triangle Shirtwaist Factory
  • Many women in NYC garment industry
  • 16-25 yrs old, of Italian or Jewish descent
  • 56-hr weeks
  • 6/week
  • Over 600 shirtwaist factories employed 30,000
    workers
  • Stress on scientific management led to
    overcrowding, women renting machines, paying for
    electricity, breaks minimized, safety shortcuts
    due to costs

28
Women strike!
  • 1909 Women want better pay, working conditions,
    dont want to costs
  • Mass strike in 1909
  • Strikers fired, arrested, etc.
  • Government support of factories meant they did
    very little to improve working conditions

29
Rosa Schneiderman, Garment Worker
30
Child Labor
31
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
32
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
33
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
34
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
35
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
36
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
37
Women Voting for a Strike!
38
Public Fear of Unions/Anarchists
39
Arresting the Girl Strikersfor Picketing
40
Scabs Hired
41
The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, March 25,
1911
42
The Shirtwaist KingsMax Blanck and Isaac Harris
43
Triangle Shirtwaist FactoryAsch Building, 8th
and 10th Floors
44
(No Transcript)
45
Inside the Building After the Fire
46
Most Doors Were Locked
47
(No Transcript)
48
Crumpled Fire Escape, 26 Died
49
10th Floor After the Fire
50
Dead Bodies on the Sidewalk
51
Scene at the Morgue
52
Relatives Review Bodies145 Dead
53
Out of the Ashes
  • Union membership surged.
  • NYC created a Bureau of FirePrevention.
  • New strict building codes werepassed.
  • Tougher fire inspection ofsweatshops.
  • Growing momentum of support for womens suffrage.

54
Ludlow Massacre
  • Strike for better working conditions in Colorado
    in 1913
  • Colorado Fuel and Iron Industries owned by John
    D. Rockefeller
  • Strikebreakers and national guard fired on
    strikers killing 13 women and children
  • Shift to protect workers and reform working
    conditions because of events like these.
About PowerShow.com