A NEW NATIONAL IDENTITY (1812 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – A NEW NATIONAL IDENTITY (1812 PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 781460-ZjAyN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

A NEW NATIONAL IDENTITY (1812

Description:

Chapter 12 A NEW NATIONAL IDENTITY (1812 1840) Section 1: The Rise of Nationalism Section 2: Expansion and Improvements Section 3: The Age of Jackson – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:92
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 31
Provided by: MC1133
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: A NEW NATIONAL IDENTITY (1812


1
A NEW NATIONAL IDENTITY(18121840)
Chapter 12
  • Section 1 The Rise of Nationalism
  • Section 2 Expansion and Improvements
  • Section 3 The Age of Jackson
  • Section 4 Indian Removal
  • Section 5 American Culture

2
OBJECTIVES
Section 1 The Rise of Nationalism
  • How did the United States settle its land
    disputes with Great Britain and Spain?
  • Why did President Monroe issue the Monroe
    Doctrine, and what were its most important points?

3
Treaties Settling Disputes between the United
States, Great Britain and Spain
Section 1 The Rise of Nationalism
  • Rush-Bagot Agreement (1817) limited naval power
    (Great Britain)
  • Convention of 1818 settled fishing rights and
    established a border (Great Britain)
  • Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819 Spain gave up all of
    Florida to the United States
  • Monroe Doctrine (1823) (Europe, Central and South
    America)

4
Why Monroe Issued the Monroe Doctrine
Section 1 The Rise of Nationalism
  • Monroe issued the Monroe Doctrine because he
    feared that Latin American independence would
    encourage European powers to take control on the
    newly independent countries.

Monroe Doctrine President James Monroes
statement forbidding further colonization in the
Americas and declaring that the United States
would view any attempt by a foreign country to
colonize as a hostile act
5
SECTION 1
The Rise of Nationalism
Question How did the United States settle its
land disputes with Great Britain and Spain?
6
SECTION 1
The Rise of Nationalism
Compromise with Spain
Compromise with Great Britain
Rush-Bagot Agreement Terms
Adams-Onis Treaty Terms
  • Spain gave Florida to the United States.
  • The United States gave up claims to present-day
    Texas.
  • United States took responsibility for up to 5
    million of United States citizens claims against
    Spain.
  • limited naval power on the Great Lakes

Convention of 1818 Terms
  • gave the United States fishing rights off parts
    of Newfoundland and Labrador coasts
  • established a border between the United States
    and Canada at the 49th parallel, as far west as
    the Rockies
  • agreed to joint occupation of the Pacific
    Northwest

7
OBJECTIVES
Section 2 Expansion and Improvements
  • What issues was the Missouri Compromise supposed
    to address?
  • How did improvements in transportation affect the
    United States?
  • Why was the 1824 presidential election
    controversial?

8
The Missouri Compromiseaddressed two issues
Section 2 Expansion and Improvements
  • the expansion of slavery
  • the balance of free and slave states

9
Transportation Improvements
Section 2 Expansion and Improvements
  • united the country
  • aided trade and economy

10
Election of 1824
Section 2 Expansion and Improvements
  • The election of 1824 was controversial because
    Adams was accused of making a corrupt bargain
    with Clay.

11
SECTION 2
Expansion and Improvements
Question How did improvements in transportation
affect the United States?
12
SECTION 2
Expansion and Improvements
Affect on the United States
Roads
connected the East coast to the interior United
States
Cumberland Road turnpikes
Canals
Erie Canal
provided faster and cheaper routes for goods to
market
Overall results of improvements in transportation
Both resulted in connecting regions of the United
States.
13
OBJECTIVES
Section 3 The Age of Jackson
  • How was Jacksonian Democracy a sign of change in
    American politics?
  • How did tariff disputes lead to the nullification
    crisis, and how did President Jackson respond?
  • Why was President Jackson against a national
    bank, and how did his opposition affect the
    economy?

14
Jacksonian Democracy
Section 3 The Age of Jackson
  • expanded voting rights
  • nominating conventions

Nominating conventions public meetings to
select the partys presidential and vice
presidential candidates
15
Nullification Crisis
Section 3 The Age of Jackson
  • Northern manufacturers wanted high tariffs and
    the southern farmers wanted low tariffs leading
    to the nullification crisis.
  • The crisis was resolved by a congressional
    compromise to lower tariffs gradually.

16
Jacksons Position on a National Bank
Section 3 The Age of Jackson
  • Jackson opposed the power of a national bank.
  • His opposition effected the economy by leading to
    inflation.

17
Regional Issues 30 years BEFORE the Civil War.
Section 3 The Age of Jackson
  • Tariffs
  • Federal vs State - Nullification crisis
    states rights
  • Federal vs State 2nd National Bank
  • Federal Law superior to State Law (McCulloch v
    Maryland)

18
SECTION 3
The Age of Jackson
Question How did tariff disputes lead to the
nullification crisis and how did President
Jackson respond?
19
SECTION 3
The Age of Jackson
STEPS LEADING TO THE NULLIFICATION CRISIS
Southern states asserted their right to nullify
protective tariffs, which they argued hurt their
economy.
Jackson threatened to send federal troops to
South Carolina to enforce federal laws.
Jackson condemned nullification.
20
OBJECTIVES
Section 4 Indian Removal
  • Why did the federal and state governments begin
    an American Indian removal policy?
  • How did American Indians such as the Cherokee
    resist removal?
  • How were American Indians affected by the removal
    from their lands?

21
Indian Removal Act
Section 4 Indian Removal
  • To end Indian conflicts and to open a southern
    settlement, Congress passed the Indian Removal
    Act in 1830 which authorized the removal of
    Indians east of the Mississippi River.

22
Cherokees resisted removal by
Section 4 Indian Removal
  • adopting white culture
  • creating a government based on the U.S.
  • suing the state of Georgia

23
The Indian Response
Section 4 Indian Removal
  • The Indians met removal with armed resistance
    leading to many Indian deaths.

24
SECTION 4
Indian Removal
Question Why did federal and state governments
begin an American Indian removal policy?
25
SECTION 4
Indian Removal
Seminole were harboring slaves and raiding towns
Gold was discovered
Reasons for American Indian Removal Policy
to end disputes between American Indians and
settlers
to open up American Indian land to settlers for
farming
26
OBJECTIVES
Section 5 American Culture
  • Who were the favorite writers of the early
    1800s, and what did they write about?
  • What was the focus of the Hudson River school?

27
Writers of the 1800s and Their Subjects
Section 5 American Culture
  • William Wirt biographies of Revolutionary
    heroes
  • Washington Irving American history using satire
  • James Fenimore Cooper novels and historical
    fiction
  • Catharine Maria Sedgwick historical fiction and
    novels

28
Hudson River School
Section 5 American Culture
  • The Hudson River school focused on artists
    painting landscapes that depicted the beauty of
    nature.

29
SECTION 5
American Culture
Question What topics did favorite writers of the
early 1800s write about?
30
SECTION 5
American Culture
FAVORITE AMERICAN WRITERS OF THE EARLY 1800s
Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper,
Catharine Maria Sedgwick
American Revolution, settlement, and the
landscape
About PowerShow.com