PINAR KILI - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – PINAR KILI PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 77a4a6-YWNjO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

PINAR KILI

Description:

Title: DYLAN THOMAS Author: ping Last modified by: Mrs Campbell Created Date: 8/16/2006 12:00:00 AM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:39
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 58
Provided by: ping111
Learn more at: http://mrscampbelleng10.weebly.com
Category:
Tags: kili | pinar | paradox

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: PINAR KILI


1
DYLAN THOMAS
  • PINAR KILIÇ
  • SULE ASLAN

2
Dylan Thomas Dylan Thomas Dylan Thomas
Dylan Marlais Thomas Dylan Marlais Thomas Dylan Marlais Thomas
Born Born 27 October 1914 Swansea, Wales, UK
Died 9 November 1953 (aged 39) New York, USA
Occupation Occupation Poet
Literary movement Literary movement Modernism Romanticism
Spouse(s) Spouse(s) Caitlin Macnamara (1937-1953)
Children Children Llewelyn Edouard Thomas (1939-2000) Aeronwy Bryn Thomas (b. 1943) Colm Garan Hart Thomas (b. 1949)
3
Early life
  • Dylan Thomas was born in the Uplands area of
    Swansea, South Wales, on 27 October 1914.
  • His father, David John Thomas, was an English
    master who taught English literature at the local
    grammar school.
  • His mother, Florence Hannah Thomas (née
    Williams), was a seamstress born in Swansea.
  • Dylan had a sister, Nancy, eight years older than
    him.

4
Early life
  • His childhood was spent largely in Swansea, with
    regular summer trips to visit his maternal aunt's
    Carmarthenshire dairy farm. These rural sojourns
    and the contrast with the town life of Swansea
    provided inspiration for much of his work,
    notably many short stories, radio essays and the
    poem Fern Hill. Thomas was known to be a sickly
    child who shied away from school and preferred
    reading on his own

5
Education
  • Thomas's formal education began at Mrs. Hole's
    'Dame School', a private school, which was
    situated a few streets away on Mirador Crescent.
  • In October 1925, Thomas attended the single-sex
    Swansea Grammar School, in the Mount Pleasant
    district of the city.
  • Thomas's first poem was published in the school's
    magazine, of which he later became an editor. He
    left school at 16 to become a reporter for the
    local newspaper, the South Wales Daily Post only
    to leave the job under pressure 18 months later
    in 1932. He then joined an amateur dramatic group
    in Mumbles, but still continued to work as a
    freelance journalist for a few more years.

6
Career
  • Thomas wrote half of his poems and many short
    stories while living at his Cwmdonkin home, And
    death shall have no dominion is one of his best
    known works written at this address.
  • His highly acclaimed first poetry volume, 18
    Poems, was published on 18 December 1934, the
    same year he moved to London.

7
Career
  • The publication of Deaths and Entrances in 1946
    was a major turning point in his career.
  • Thomas was well known for being a versatile and
    dynamic speaker, best known for his poetry
    readings.
  • His powerful voice would captivate American
    audiences during his speaking tours of the early
    1950s. He made over 200 broadcasts for the BBC.

8
Marriage and children
  • In the spring of 1936, Dylan Thomas met Caitlin
    MacNamara, a dancer. They met in the Wheatsheaf
    public house, in the Fitzrovia area of London's
    West End. A drunken Thomas proposed marriage on
    the spot, and the two began a courtship.

9
Addiction
  • Thomas liked to boast about his addiction,
    saying
  • An alcoholic is someone you don't like, who
    drinks as much as you do.
  • Thomas "liked the taste of whisky," and he did
    quite his fair share of drinking, although the
    amount he is supposed to have drunk may have been
    an exaggeration.

10
Style
  • Thomas's verbal style played against strict verse
    forms, such as the villanelle ("Do Not Go Gentle
    into That Good Night").
  • His images were carefully ordered in a patterned
    sequence, and his major theme was the unity of
    all life, the continuing process of life and
    death and new life that linked the generations.

11
  • Thomas saw biology as a magical transformation
    producing unity out of diversity, and in his
    poetry he sought a poetic ritual to celebrate
    this unity.
  • He saw men and women locked in cycles of growth,
    love, procreation, new growth, death, and new
    life again. Therefore, each image engenders its
    opposite.
  • Thomas derived his closely woven, sometimes
    self-contradictory images from the Bible, Welsh
    folklore and preaching, and Freud.

12
Poetry
  • Thomas's poetry is famous for its musicality,
    most notable in poems such as Fern Hill, In the
    White Giant's Thigh, In Country Sleep and Ballad
    of the Long-legged Bait. Do not go gentle into
    that good night, possibly his most popular poem,
    is unrepresentative of his usual poetic style.

13
  • Thomas once confided that the poems which had
    most influenced him were Mother Goose rhymes
    which his parents taught him when he was a child.
    He did not understand all of their contents, but
    he loved their sounds, and the acoustic qualities
    of the English language became his focus in his
    work later.
  • He claimed that the meanings of a poem were of
    "very secondary nature" to him.

14
Bibliography
  • Poetry
  • 18 Poems (1934)
  • The Map of Love (1939)
  • Twenty-Five Poems (1936)
  • New Poems (1943)
  • Deaths and Entrances (1946)
  • Twenty-Six Poems (1950)
  • In Country Sleep (1952)
  • Collected Poems, 1934-1952 (1952)

15
Death
  • Dylan Thomas died in New York on 9 November 1953.
    The first rumours were of a brain haemorrhage,
    followed by reports that he had been mugged. Soon
    came the stories about alcohol, that he had drunk
    himself to death. Later, there were speculations
    about drugs and diabetes.

16
Impact on other cultural figures
  • Musician Bob Dylan once said the work of Dylan
    Thomas influenced the change of his name from
    Zimmerman to Dylan
  • Welsh musician John Cale has been highly
    influenced by the work of Dylan Thomas, even
    setting several of his poems (There Was a
    Saviour, On a Wedding Anniversary, Lie Still,
    Sleep Becalmed and Do Not Go Gentle Into That
    Good Night) to orchestral music on his 1989 album
    Words for the Dying, as well as a musical setting
    of A Child's Christmas in Wales on his album
    Paris 1919.

17
  • American author Shirley Jackson met Thomas once
    briefly in her family home and wrote several
    short stories dedicated to and loosely based
    around Thomas.
  • American band Brave Saint Saturn quoted a portion
    of the poem "And death shall have no dominion" in
    the song "Here is the News" from the album
    Anti-Meridian.

18
DO NOT GO GENTLE INTO THAT GOOD NIGHT
Wild men who caught and sang the sun in
flight, And learn, too late, they grieved it on
its way, Do not go gentle into that good night.
Grave men, near death, who see with blinding
sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be
gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
And you, my father, there on the sad
height, Curse, bless me now with your fierce
tears, I pray. Do not go gentle into that good
night. Rage, rage against the dying of the
light.
  • Do not go gentle into that good night,
  • Old age should burn and rave at close of day
  • Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
  • Because their words had forked no lightning they
  • Do not go gentle into that good night.
  • Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
  • Their frail deeds might have danced in a green
    bay,
  • Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

19
DO NOT GO GENTLE INTO THAT GOOD NIGHT
  • Do not go gentle into that good night, a
    villanelle composed in 1952, is considered to be
    among the finest works by Dylan Thomas .
    Originally published in the journal Botteghe
    Oscure in 1951, it also appeared as part of the
    collection "In Country Sleep."
  • Written for his dying father, it is one of
    Thomas's most-quoted works.

20
Subject
  • Dylan Thomas father had been a robust, militant
    man most of his life, and when in his eighties,
    he became blind and weak, his son was disturbed
    seeing his father become soft or gentle. In
    this poem, Thomas is rousing his father to
    continue being the fierce man he had previously
    been.

21
  • Thomas watched his father, formerly in the Army,
    grow weak and frail with old age. Thus, the
    speaker in his poem tries to convince his father
    to fight against imminent death.
  • The speaker addresses his father using wise men,
    good men, wild men, or grave men as examples to
    illustrate the same message that no matter how
    they have lived their lives or what they feel at
    the end they should die fighting. He implies that
    one should not die without fighting for one's
    life, or after life.

22
  • Stanza 1 The first line is a command, Do not go
    gentle into that good night. Dont give up
    easily.
  • The second line Old age should burn and rave at
    close of day offers the speakers belief that
    even when old and infirm, the man should stay
    energetic and complain if necessary as long as he
    does not give in to death easily.
  • Then line three again is a command, Rage, rage
    against the dying of the light
  • Fight, complain, rail against the oncoming of
    death.

23
Stanza 2
  • Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
  • Because their words had forked no lightning they
  • Do not go gentle into that good night.
  • fork v. branch out, split, separate, divide
    make into the shape of a fork
  • Even though wise men know that they cannot keep
    death away forever and especially if they have
    not accomplished their goals in life, they dont
    accept death easily they Do not go gentle . . .
    .

24
Stanza 3
  • Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
  • Their frail deeds might have danced in a green
    bay,
  • Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • frail adj. fragile flimsy weak, slight, thin
  • bay n. small arm of the sea where the shore
    curves inward
  • Good men exclaim what might have been, their
    frail deed might have shone like the sun
    reflecting off the waters of a green bay, and
    they, therefore, Rage, rage against the
    oncoming of death.

25
Stanza 4
  • Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
  • And learn, too late, they grieve it on its way,
  • Do not go gentle into that good night.
  • Wild men whose antics seemed to shine as brightly
    as the sun and who thought they were so
    optimistic, but later realized they spent much of
    their life in grief, still they Do not go gentle
    . . . .

26
Stanza 5
  • Grave men, near death, who see with blinding
    sight
  • Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
  • Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • gay adj. happy, cheerful
  • Grave men whose eyes are fading fast can still
    flash lifes happiness, as they Rage, rage . .

27
Stanza 6
  • And you, my father, there on the sad height,
  • Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I
    pray.
  • Do not go gentle into that good night.
  • Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • The speaker addresses his father. And so my
    father you are nearing deathyell at me, scream
    at me, cry out to see you do that would be a
    blessing for me and I beg you to show me that
    militant man you once were Do not go gentle . .
    . .

28
Other explanations
  • Another explication is that the speaker admits
    that death is unavoidable, but encourages all men
    to fight death. This is not for their own sake,
    but to give closure and hope to the kin that they
    will leave behind. To support this, he gives
    examples of wise men, good men, wild men, and
    grave men to his father, who was dying at the
    time this poem was written. There is little
    textual evidence for this interpretation,
    however, except the words "curse, bless me now
    with your fierce tears, I pray." Also, it has
    been historically stated that Thomas never showed
    this poem to his father if so, it would seem
    that Thomas composed it more for his own benefit
    than his father's.

29
Literary devices
  • The form on the poem is a villanelle, with a rime
    scheme alternating night and day.
  • Good night is a metaphor.
  • Dying of the light is a metaphor.
  • Old age should burn and rave in line 2 is a
    combination of rhetoric and personification.

30
Literary devices
  • Burn in that same line is used metaphorically,
    as is dark in line 4.
  • In line 5 their words had forked no lightning
    is metaphorical.
  • Line 8 Their frail deeds might have danced in a
    green bay employs personification and metaphor.

31
Literary devices
  • Line 10 Wild men who sang the sun in flight is
    exaggeration and metaphor.
  • Line 11 they grieved it on its way is also
    exaggeration and metaphor.
  • Line 14 Blind eyes could blaze like meteors is
    a simile.
  • Line 17 Curse, bless, me now with your fierce
    tears, I pray is a paradox.

32
THE FORCE THAT THROUGH THE GREEN FUSE DRIVES THE
FLOWER
  • The force that through the green fuse drives
    the flower Drives my green age that blasts the
    roots of trees Is my destroyer. And I am dumb
    to tell the crooked rose My youth is bent by the
    same wintry fever.
  • The force that drives the water through the
    rocks Drives my red blood that dries the
    mouthing streams Turns mine to wax. And I am
    dumb to mouth unto my veins How at the mountain
    spring the same mouth sucks.

The hand that whirls the water in the pool Stirs
the quicksand that ropes the blowing wind Hauls
my shroud sail. And I am dumb to tell the
hanging man How of my clay is made the hangman's
lime.
The lips of time leech to the fountain head
Love drips and gathers, but the fallen blood
Shall calm her sores. And I am dumb to tell a
weather's wind How time has ticked a heaven
round the stars. And I am dumb to tell the
lover's tomb How at my sheet goes the same
crooked worm.
33
THE FORCE THAT THROUGH THE GREEN FUSE DRIVES THE
FLOWER
  • The force that through the green fuse drives the
    flower is a poem by Dylan Thomas written in the
    1930s. It is a most beautiful poem full of
    wistfulness and sorrow with a sense of
    helplessness.
  • In the poem Thomas handles all of the literary
    elements with dexterity with possible
    interpretations. But the general theme, the cycle
    of life, is evident through his skillful use of
    imagery, symbolism, and connotation.

34
Theme
  • The main theme of this poem is the connection
    between nature and life. Thomas speaks of a
    mysterious and unstoppable force that controls
    both mankind and nature, forever linking them
    together, as his youth is bent by the same
    wintry fever as the crooked rose, and he
    believes that the lives of mankind and nature are
    not separable.

35
Theme
  • Thomas talks about a power, the force, which
    pushes the flower up through the earth and the
    water through the rocks makes the water swirl in
    a circle and sends the sailboat moving through
    the water and moves the quicksand downward
    taking everything with it that got caught in its
    spin.
  • There is a theme of regeneration in all stanzas.

36
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 1
  • The green fuse represents the stem of the
    flower, but through connotation fuse is thought
    of as something explosive, contrary to a gentle
    flower.
  • The word green implies youth and growth as he
    describes his age. In the second and third lines,
    the force that produced life in the flower and
    himself is described as the same force that
    destroys life.
  • The force that through the green fuse drives
    the flower Drives my green age that
    blasts the roots of trees Is my destroyer. And I
    am dumb to tell the crooked rose My youth is
    bent by the same wintry fever. (1-5)
  • fuse n. projectiles for weaponry
  • blast v. to explode
  • crooked adj. evil, corrupt
  • wintry adj. cold, snowy

37
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 1
  • The fourth line shatters the beautiful image of a
    rose, a symbol of healthiness and strength, when
    it is described as crooked, inviting negative
    connotations. Just as the rose is delicate, he is
    also weakened and the seasons of his life change
    from springtime liveliness to wintry fever. The
    image of a frail old man comes to mind.
  • The force that through the green fuse drives
    the flower Drives my green age that
    blasts the roots of trees Is my destroyer. And I
    am dumb to tell the crooked rose My youth is
    bent by the same wintry fever. (1-5)

38
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 2
  • The force here extends the flow of the stream
    as it drives it along, similar to the first
    stanza in which the force extended the growth of
    the flower.
  • Red blood is similar to green age from the
    first stanza they both represent life and
    vivacity. In lines seven and eight the force
    becomes destructive again as in the first stanza.

The force that drives the water through the
rocks Drives my red blood that dries the
mouthing streams Turns mine to wax. And I am
dumb to mouth unto my veins How at the
mountain spring the same mouth sucks.
(6-10) mouthing adj. speaking
39
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 2
  • The force that pushed life along becomes the
    force that takes away life as it dries the
    stream and turns the speakers blood to wax,
    which represents the speakers stiff corpse after
    embalming.
  • As in the first stanza he is unable to
    communicate his feelings. An attempt to explain
    the situation to his body would be futile, since
    it is already lifeless.

The force that drives the water through the
rocks Drives my red blood that dries the
mouthing streams Turns mine to wax. And I am
dumb to mouth unto my veins How at the
mountain spring the same mouth sucks.
(6-10)
40
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 3
  • The hand agitates the normally calm waters of
    the pool and the generally motionless quicksand,
    and it is so powerful that it also controls the
    wind.
  • The third line of this stanza is a double
    entendre. The speaker can be referring to a ship
    where the shroud is one of the ropes that
    support a ships mast in this case the hands
    power is demonstrated as it controls the ships
    course.

The hand that whirls the water in the
pool Stirs the quicksand that ropes the
blowing wind Hauls my shroud sail. And I am dumb
to tell the hanging man How of my clay is
made the hangmans lime. (11-15) whirl v. to
spin around clay n. workable earth
material lime n. binding material
41
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 3
  • The shroud would be the sheet used to wrap a
    dead body for burial.
  • In the fourth and fifth lines the speaker find it
    senseless to communicate his feelings with the
    hanging man since they both share the same
    fate. The speakers body, his clay, will be in
    the hangmans cavity, which is filled with lime
    to prevent the smell of rotting corpses.

The hand that whirls the water in the
pool Stirs the quicksand that ropes the
blowing wind Hauls my shroud sail. And I am dumb
to tell the hanging man How of my clay is
made the hangmans lime. (11-15)
42
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 4
  • The denotation of fountainhead is an original
    source, where life begins, time leeches the
    fountain head just as age exhausts life.
  • The next line leans towards the reoccurring theme
    of death where fallen blood represents a dead
    person.
  • The speaker brings another life into being
    through reproduction in line one and in lines two
    and three.

The lips of time leech to the fountain
head Love drips and gathers, but the fallen
blood Shall calm her sores. And I am dumb to tell
a weathers wind How time has ticked a
heaven round the stars. (16-20) leech v. to
remove the soluble constituents from by
subjecting to the action of percolating water or
other liquid
43
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 4
The lips of time leech to the fountain
head Love drips and gathers, but the fallen
blood Shall calm her sores. And I am dumb to tell
a weathers wind How time has ticked a
heaven round the stars. (16-20) tick v. to click
  • Time is referred to as her and the burden on
    society is represented by sores. He is
    incapable of explaining to the wind how time
    works because the wind already knows the nature
    of time. The weathers wind has been to the
    heavens and the stars and has seen all possible
    weathers.

44
Other explanations
  • He describes this force as linking life and death
    in an eternal cycle of my clay is made the
    hangmans lime. Thomas suggests late in the poem
    the name of the force that he is talking about
    (the lips of) time, emphasising his point that
    this force is powerful and central to all.

45
Literary devices
  • Structurally the poem follows a certain rhythm
  • Each stanza beginning with the word the,
    and the first two stanzas beginning with the same
    words altogether The force that drives, which
    reflects the regularity of this cycle and its
    continuance.
  • The poet doesnt use rhymes, but sometimes uses
    words that sound similar such as the ending
  • tomb and worm, to give a sense of comfort
    and regularity when read out.

46
Literary devices
  • The organisations of ideas in the first three
    stanzas are very similar
  • The first part concerns (in the first two
    stanzas) comparing mankind with nature in terms
    of life and creation, and after the semi-colon is
    the mention of destruction. Then comes a short
    line showing how the force will cause the death
    of the poet. The last two lines show how the poet
    is unable to articulate the wonders of the power.

47
Literary devices
  • Word order is sometimes emphatic
  • The force starting a line makes it clear
    that that is the major theme of the poem, and the
    second line of many of the stanzas begin with a
    verb that emphasises power.
  • Often a verb is used to start the line, such
    as drives and stirs, to reinforce the
    importance of the actions the themed force
    performs.

48
Literary devices
  • The use of imagery and contrast in language
  • Thomas uses many colours in terms of imagery,
    which adds depth and meaning to the poem, as
    colours can symbolise numerous things. green
    stresses life and youth, and also the fact that
    the same word is used to describe the age of a
    human and the life of a flower. The use of red
    blood also adds to this, as red is a very
    healthy and lively colour. His imagery is often
    extremely interesting and original. The shroud
    sail reminds the reader of perhaps a Viking
    funeral, which draws many connections with the
    sea and the wind.

49
And Death Shall Have No Dominion
And death shall have no dominion. Dead man naked
they shall be one With the man in the wind and
the west moon When their bones are picked clean
and the clean bones gone, They shall have stars
at elbow and foot Though they go mad they shall
be sane, Though they sink through the sea they
shall rise again Though lovers be lost love
shall not And death shall have no dominion.
And death shall have no dominion. Under the
windings of the sea They lying long shall not die
windily Twisting on racks when sinews give
way, Strapped to a wheel, yet they shall not
break Faith in their hands shall snap in
two, And the unicorn evils run them through
Split all ends up they shan't crack And death
shall have no dominion.
And death shall have no dominion. No more may
gulls cry at their ears Or waves break loud on
the seashores Where blew a flower may a flower
no more Lift its head to the blows of the rain
Though they be mad and dead as nails, Heads of
the characters hammer through daisies Break in
the sun till the sun breaks down, And death shall
have no dominion.
50
Theme
Theme The repetition of the lines, And death
shall have no dominion reinforces the theme of
the poem. The message rendered was to attain
victory over death and it is even used as the
title of the poem. By repeating the lines at the
beginning and end of each stanza, the poem has
developed a nice structure and a message to the
readers. The first stanza idealizes mankind, the
second emphasis on God and suffering while the
third focuses on nature. The poem is structured
into three stanzas each containing ten lines. The
poem is composed in near rhyme. Near rhyming mean
words that come near rhyming but do not really
rhyme. It is also known as imperfect rhyme.
51
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 1
Each stanza begins and ends with the title of
the poem, And Death Shall Have No Dominion. In
the first stanza, the poet conveys that in death,
all are one. Race and skin color no longer have
any meaning when a person dies. The dead body
reunites with nature. In death, everyone is naked
and shall be one. Theres no discrimination in
death. The poet goes on to say that after death,
men become part of constellations, something
bigger than he was, when he was alive. Though the
dead mens bones are naked, they shall be clothed
in eternal glory and shall have stars at their
elbows and feet. In the following lines, the poet
says that though the men will go mad they will
attain sanity. Those who have drowned in the sea
of human sorrow shall rise again and taste joy.
Moreover, lovers who were lost will be united
after death. Finally he uses the final lines,
and death shall have no dominion.
And death shall have no dominion. Dead man naked
they shall be one With the man in the wind and
the west moon When their bones are picked clean
and the clean bones gone, They shall have stars
at elbow and foot Though they go mad they shall
be sane, Though they sink through the sea they
shall rise again Though lovers be lost love
shall not And death shall have no dominion.
52
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 2
The second stanza of And Death Shall Have No
Dominion takes the reader to a graveyard which
is located on the sea floor. The poet says that
one can find the souls of the sailors or the
others who lost their lives in the sea. According
to him, these people died courageously. Their
lives have tortured them, the wheel of time has
tested them but none of these could break them.
Faith has been cracked in two and unicorn evils
will put their horns through them. The unicorn
is an ancient mythical creature, sometimes used
to symbolize Christ or God. Unicorn horns are
considered as harder than diamonds and can
neutralize poison. Their tears can heal wounds
both of physical and mental nature. Again the
stanza ends with the lines, and death shall have
no dominion representing the triumph and main
theme of the poem.
And death shall have no dominion. Under the
windings of the sea They lying long shall not die
windily Twisting on racks when sinews give
way, Strapped to a wheel, yet they shall not
break Faith in their hands shall snap in
two, And the unicorn evils run them through
Split all ends up they shan't crack And death
shall have no dominion.
53
Analysis of the Poem
Stanza 3
The final stanza talks about the land, along
the seashore. The poet begins the final stanza by
saying that the dead are no longer disturbed by
the materialistic world and the physical elements
that made up their homes. Gulls are sea birds
which will no longer cry at their ears they will
not be able to hear the loud noises made by
waves. Yet new life will spring up, an intrepid
life like a flower that lifts its head to blows
of the rain. Their innocence shall burst through
like daisies. Their innocence ultimately wins
over the sun and breaks it down. The phrase
heads of the characters hammer through daisies
hints at the characters of those dead people who
hammer through pain until innocence breaks them.
The daisy blooms as dawn breaks, symbolizing the
burst of innocence. In the same way, death
becomes powerless as humanity regains purity and
recollects hope, disregarding pain and hatred. In
this way, death can be overcome and death shall
have no dominion.
And death shall have no dominion. No more may
gulls cry at their ears Or waves break loud on
the seashores Where blew a flower may a flower
no more Lift its head to the blows of the rain
Though they be mad and dead as nails, Heads of
the characters hammer through daisies Break in
the sun till the sun breaks down, And death shall
have no dominion.
54
Literary devices
Poetic devices in And Death Shall Have No
Dominion included pun, paradox, repetition,
alliteration, metaphors and contrast. PUN An
example of pun is found in line 12. Windily
means both the movement of the sea and also the
shroud in which the dead are buried in the sea.
PARADOX Unicorn evils through is an example of
paradox because unicorn is a symbol of Christ and
has nothing to do with evil. Though they go mad,
they shall be sane is also an example of
paradox. REPETITION The most distinct
repetition is and death shall have no dominion
which is repeated in every stanza, marks the most
important idea of the poem. The repetition of the
word though is repeated in the first stanza
reinforces the basic theme and provides a secure
structure. ALLITERATION Alliteration is the
close repetition of the consonant sounds at the
beginning of words to facilitate narration.
Though lovers be lost love shall not is a fine
example of alliteration.
55
Literary devices
METAPHOR A metaphor is a figure of speech that
compares two things but is not clearly
stated. Faith in their hands shall snap in two.
In this line, the poet has used a metaphor to
compare faith with a wooden stick. IMAGERY
Images of sea, torture and biblical characters
are used throughout the poem. Sea imagery is
found in the first stanza by depicting that the
dead sank in the sea and rose again. In the
second stanza, windings of the sea is an image
of the sea itself. Sound of gulls and waves
are examples of sound imagery. Biblical imagery
is found by describing the rise of the dead
symbolizing Christs Revelation. The use of
unicorn, the mythical sea creature is also an
example of biblical imagery. Twisting on racks
when sinews give way, strapped to a wheel, yet
they shall not break brings out an image of the
human body of muscles and bones in pain.
56
I Fellowed Sleep
Faded my elbow ghost, the mothers-eyed, As,
blowing on the angels, I was lost On that cloud
coast to each grave-grabbing shade I blew the
dreaming fellows to their bed Where still they
sleep unknowing of their ghost. Then all the
matter of the living air Raised up a voice, and,
climbing on the words, I spelt my vision with a
hand and hair, How light the sleeping on this
soily star, How deep the waking in the worlded
clouds. There grows the hours' ladder to the
sun, Each rung a love or losing to the last, The
inches monkeyed by the blood of man. And old, mad
man still climbing in his ghost, My fathers'
ghost is climbing in the rain.
I fellowed sleep who kissed me in the brain, Let
fall the tear of time the sleeper's
eye, Shifting to light, turned on me like a
moon. So, planning-heeled, I flew along my
man And dropped on dreaming and the upward
sky. I fled the earth and, naked, climbed the
weather, Reaching a second ground far from the
stars And there we wept I and a ghostly
other, My mothers-eyed, upon the tops of trees I
fled that ground as lightly as a feather.
'My fathers' globe knocks on its nave and
sings.' 'This that we tread was, too, your
father's land.' 'But this we tread bears the
angelic gangs Sweet are their fathered faces in
their wings.' 'These are but dreaming men.
Breathe, and they fade.'
http//www.humanities360.com/index.php/themes-in-d
ylan-thomas-poetry-35072/
57
(No Transcript)
About PowerShow.com