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Assessing for Learning Workshop

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Title: Assessment: A Collective Commitment Author: Peggy Maki Last modified by: ykadelski Created Date: 7/6/2002 2:20:30 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Assessing for Learning Workshop


1
Assessing for Learning Workshop
  • Presented at
  • CCRI
  • February 23, 2005
  • Peggy Maki, Ph.D.
  • PeggyMaki_at_aol.com

2
Topics Covered
  • Anchoring the Commitment
  • Integration of Teaching, Learning, and Assessing
  • Collective Articulation of Learning Outcome
    Statements
  • Development of Maps and Inventories
  • Identification and Alignment of Assessment
    Methods

3
Anchoring the Commitment
  • Assessment?

Its simple you figure out what they want find
the quickest, least damaging way to respond send
off a report and then forget it.
4
Origin of the Commitment
Internal
  • External

5
How do you learn?
  • List several strategies you use to learn
  • ________________________________________________
    __________________________________________________
    __________________________________________________
    _____________________

6
Research on Learning that Anchors the Commitment
  • Learning is a complex process of
    interpretation-not a linear process
  • Learners create meaning as opposed to receive
    meaning
  • Knowledge is socially constructed (importance of
    peer-to-peer interaction)
  • National Research Council. Knowing What
    Students Know, 2001.

7
  • People learn differentlyprefer certain ways of
    learning (learning inventories)
  • Deep learning occurs over timetransference
  • Meta-cognitive processes are a significant means
    of reinforcing learning (thinking about ones
    thinking)

8
  • Learning involves creating relationships between
    short-term and long-term memory
  • Transfer of new knowledge into different contexts
    is important to deepen understanding
  • Practice in various contexts creates expertise

9
Integrated Learning.
10
Specific Questions that Guide Assessment
  • What do you expect your students to know
  • and be able to do by the end of their program
    of study or by end of their education at your
    institution?
  • What do the curricula and other educational
    experiences add up to?
  • What do you do in your classes or in your
    programs to promote the kinds of learning or
    development that the institution seeks?

11
Questions (cond)
  • Which students benefit from various
    teaching/learning strategies or educational
    experiences?
  • What educational processes are responsible for
    the intended student outcomes the institution
    seeks?
  • How can you help students make connections
    between classroom learning and experiences
    outside of the classroom?

12
Questions, cond
  • What pedagogies/educational experiences develop
    knowledge, abilities, habits of mind, ways of
    knowing/problem solving?
  • How are curricula and pedagogy designed to
    develop knowledge, abilities, habits of mind,
    ways of knowing?

13
  • How do you intentionally build upon what each of
    you teaches or fosters to achieve programmatic
    and institutional objectivescontexts for
    learning?
  • What methods of assessment capture desired
    student learning--methods that align with
    pedagogy, content, curricular and instructional
    design?

14
Integration of Teaching, Learning, and Assessing
  • Pedagogy
  • Curricular design
  • Instructional design
  • Educational tools
  • Educational experiences
  • Students learning histories/styles

15
Example of a Principles of Commitment Statement
  • Scholarly teaching is an intellectual
    activity designed to bring about documented
    improvements in student learning. Scholarly
    teaching reflects a thoughtful engagement and
    integration of ideas, examples and resources,
    coupled with pedagogically informed strategies of
    course design and implementation to bring about
    more effective teaching and learning. Scholarly
    teaching documents the effectiveness of student
    learning in a manner that models or reflects
    disciplinary methods and values.

16
The Scholarly Teacher.
  • exhibits curiosity about his/her students,
    student learning and students learning
    environments
  • identifies issues/ questions (problems) related
    to some aspect of student learning
  • develops, plans and implements strategies
    designed to address/enhance student learning

17
  • documents the outcomes of his/her strategies
    using methodology common to the discipline
  • reflects upon and shares with others his/her
    ideas, designs, strategies, and outcomes of
    his/her work

18
  • consistently and continually builds upon his/her
    work and others (i.e., process is iterative)
  • (Statement developed by the University of
    Portland 2002 AAHE Summer Academy Team and
    contributed by Marlene Moore, Dean, College of
    Arts and Sciences)

19
Collective Articulation of Learning Outcome
Statements
  • List the desired kinds of knowledge,
    abilities, habits of mind, ways of knowing, and
    dispositions that you desire your students to
    demonstrate
  • --------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------
  • --------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------
  • --------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------
  • --------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------
  • --------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------

20
What Is a Learning Outcome Statement?
  • Describes learning desired within a context
  • Relies on active verbs (create, compose,
    calculate)
  • Emerges from our collective intentions
    over time

21
  • Can be mapped to curricular and co-curricular
    practices (ample, multiple and varied
    opportunities to learn over time)
  • Can be assessed quantitatively or qualitatively
    during students undergraduate and graduate
    careers

22
  • Is written for a course, program, or institution

23
Levels of Learning Outcome Statements
24
Distinguishing between Objectives and Outcomes
  • Objectives state overarching expectations such
    as--
  • Students will develop effective oral
  • communication skills.
  • OR
  • Students will understand different
  • economic principles.

25
Example from ABET
  • Design and conduct experiment analyze and
    interpret data

26
Compare
  • Students will write
  • effectively.

to
  • Students will compose a range of
    professional documents designed to solve
    problems for different audiences and purposes.

27
Compare
  • Students will write
  • effectively.

to
Students will summarize recent articles on
economics and identify underlying economic
assumptions.
28
Example from ACRL
  • Literate student evaluates information and
    its sources critically and incorporates selected
    information into his or her knowledge and value
    system.
  • ONE OUTCOME Student examines and compares
    information from various sources in order to
    evaluate reliability, validity,accuracy,
    timeliness, and point of view or bias.

29
Ways to Articulate Outcomes
  • Adapt from professional organizations
  • Derive from mission of institution/program/departm
    ent/service
  • Derive from students work that demonstrates
    interdisciplinary thinking, ways of knowing, or
    problem solving

30
  • Derive from faculty to faculty interview process
  • Derive from exercise focused on listing one or
    two outcomes you attend to

31
Characteristics of A Good Outcomes Statement
  • Describes learning desired within a context
  • Relies on active verbs (analyze, create, compose,
    calculate, construct)
  • Emerges from our collective intentions
    over time

32
  • Can be mapped to curricular and co-curricular
    practices (ample, multiple and varied
    opportunities to learn over time)
  • Can be assessed quantitatively or qualitatively
    during students undergraduate and graduate
    careers

33
Write several outcome statements that capture
what students should achieve based on your
interdisciplinary focus
34
How well do your outcome statements meet
characteristics of a good statement?
35
Development of Maps and Inventories
  • Reveal how we translate outcomes into educational
    practices offering students multiple and diverse
    opportunities to learn
  • Help us to identify appropriate times to assess
    those outcomes
  • Identify gaps in learning or opportunities to
    practice

36
  • Help students understand our expectations of them
  • Place ownership of learning on students
  • Enable them to develop their own maps or learning
    chronologies

37
How will you use maps and inventories?
  • Discuss team how you will go about the process of
    developing a curricular or curricular-co-curricula
    r map and how you will label peoples entries
  • Discuss how you might use inventories

38
Approaches to Learning
  • Surface Learning
  • Deep Learning

39
List of Attachments
  • Questions that examine the educational practices
    that underlie learning outcome statements
  • Checklist for outcome statements
  • Dissemination of outcome statements
  • Curricular-co-curricular map
  • Inventories of assessment and educational
    practices

40
Works Cited
  • Maki, P. (2004). Assessing for Learning
    Building a Sustainable Commitment Across the
    Institution. Sterling, VA Stylus Publishing,
    LLC, and the American Association for Higher
    Education.
  • National Research Council. (2001). Knowing What
    Students Know The Science and Design of
    Educational Assessment. Washington, D.C.
    National Academy Press
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