1.2 Read and show understanding of extended written texts - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – 1.2 Read and show understanding of extended written texts PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 778770-YzQxM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

1.2 Read and show understanding of extended written texts

Description:

1.2 Read and show understanding of extended written texts Goal: To be aware of the reading and response requirements in preparation for this unit. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:247
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 69
Provided by: mmu109
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: 1.2 Read and show understanding of extended written texts


1
1.2 Read and show understanding of extended
written texts
  • Goal To be aware of the reading and response
    requirements in preparation for this unit.

2
Starter Who is this?
  • WRONG
  • WRONG
  • WRONG
  • WRONG
  • WRONG
  • WRONG
  • WRONG
  • WRONG
  • WRONG

3
Reading Requirements
  • MUST be completed by term Three 2009
  • You will be required to submit a comment to the
    reading forum once per week
  • Your comments will be responses to general
    questions posted by your teacher
  • This is homework it is not optional!!!!
  • First response due this Friday.

4
Frankenstein The Plot
  • Goal To ensure your understanding of the plot is
    secure to enable deeper analysis to be carried
    out successfully
  • Starter Sparknotes Quiz
  • http//www.sparknotes.com/lit/frankenstein/quiz.ht
    ml

5
Plot Summary
  • Construct a diagram outlining the main elements
    of the plot.
  • You MUST find a way of showing the narrative
    viewpoint through which events are related.
  • Use the information on the video and following
    slides if you must

6
Video Summary BEWARE THE ERROR
7
  • In a series of letters, Robert Walton, the
    captain of a ship bound for the North Pole,
    recounts to his sister back in England the
    progress of his dangerous mission. Successful
    early on, the mission is soon interrupted by seas
    full of impassable ice. Trapped, Walton
    encounters Victor Frankenstein, who has been
    traveling by dog-drawn sledge across the ice and
    is weakened by the cold. Walton takes him aboard
    ship, helps nurse him back to health, and hears
    the fantastic tale of the monster that
    Frankenstein created.
  •  
  • Victor first describes his early life in Geneva.
    At the end of a blissful childhood spent in the
    company of Elizabeth Lavenza (his cousin in the
    1818 edition, his adopted sister in the 1831
    edition) and friend Henry Clerval, Victor enters
    the university of Ingolstadt to study natural
    philosophy and chemistry. There, he is consumed
    by the desire to discover the secret of life and,
    after several years of research, becomes
    convinced that he has found it.
  •  
  • Armed with the knowledge he has long been
    seeking, Victor spends months feverishly
    fashioning a creature out of old body parts. One
    climactic night, in the secrecy of his apartment,
    he brings his creation to life. When he looks at
    the monstrosity that he has created, however, the
    sight horrifies him. After a fitful night of
    sleep, interrupted by the specter of the monster
    looming over him, he runs into the streets,
    eventually wandering in remorse. Victor runs into
    Henry, who has come to study at the university,
    and he takes his friend back to his apartment.
    Though the monster is gone, Victor falls into a
    feverish illness.
  •  
  • Sickened by his horrific deed, Victor prepares to
    return to Geneva, to his family, and to health.
    Just before departing Ingolstadt, however, he
    receives a letter from his father informing him
    that his youngest brother, William, has been
    murdered. Grief-stricken, Victor hurries home.
    While passing through the woods where William was
    strangled, he catches sight of the monster and
    becomes convinced that the monster is his
    brother's murderer. Arriving in Geneva, Victor
    finds that Justine Moritz, a kind, gentle girl
    who had been adopted by the Frankenstein
    household, has been accused. She is tried,
    condemned, and executed, despite her assertions
    of innocence. Victor grows despondent, guilty
    with the knowledge that the monster he has
    created bears responsibility for the death of two
    innocent loved ones.
  •  
  • Hoping to ease his grief, Victor takes a vacation
    to the mountains. While he is alone one day,
    crossing an enormous glacier, the monster
    approaches him. The monster admits the murder of
    William but begs for understanding. Lonely,
    shunned, and forlorn, he says that he struck out
    at William in a desperate attempt to injure
    Victor, his cruel creator. The monster begs
    Victor to create a mate for him, a monster
    equally grotesque to serve as his sole companion.
  •  

8
  • Victor refuses at first, horrified by the
    prospect of creating a second monster. The
    monster is eloquent and persuasive, however, and
    he eventually convinces Victor. After returning
    to Geneva, Victor heads for England, accompanied
    by Henry, to gather information for the creation
    of a female monster. Leaving Henry in Scotland,
    he secludes himself on a desolate island in the
    Orkneys and works reluctantly at repeating his
    first success. One night, struck by doubts about
    the morality of his actions, Victor glances out
    the window to see the monster glaring in at him
    with a frightening grin. Horrified by the
    possible consequences of his work, Victor
    destroys his new creation. The monster, enraged,
    vows revenge, swearing that he will be with
    Victor on Victor's wedding night.
  •  
  • Later that night, Victor takes a boat out onto a
    lake and dumps the remains of the second creature
    in the water. The wind picks up and prevents him
    from returning to the island. In the morning, he
    finds himself ashore near an unknown town. Upon
    landing, he is arrested and informed that he will
    be tried for a murder discovered the previous
    night. Victor denies any knowledge of the murder,
    but when shown the body, he is shocked to behold
    his friend Henry Clerval, with the mark of the
    monster's fingers on his neck. Victor falls ill,
    raving and feverish, and is kept in prison until
    his recovery, after which he is acquitted of
    the crime.
  •  
  • Shortly after returning to Geneva with his
    father, Victor marries Elizabeth. He fears the
    monster's warning and suspects that he will be
    murdered on his wedding night. To be cautious, he
    sends Elizabeth away to wait for him. While he
    awaits the monster, he hears Elizabeth scream and
    realizes that the monster had been hinting at
    killing his new bride, not himself. Victor
    returns home to his father, who dies of grief a
    short time later. Victor vows to devote the rest
    of his life to finding the monster and exacting
    his revenge, and he soon departs to begin his
    quest.
  •  
  • Victor tracks the monster ever northward into the
    ice. In a dogsled chase, Victor almost catches up
    with the monster, but the sea beneath them swells
    and the ice breaks, leaving an unbridgeable gap
    between them. At this point, Walton encounters
    Victor, and the narrative catches up to the time
    of Walton's fourth letter to his sister.
  •  
  • Walton tells the remainder of the story in
    another series of letters to his sister. Victor,
    already ill when the two men meet, worsens and
    dies shortly thereafter. When Walton returns,
    several days later, to the room in which the body
    lies, he is startled to see the monster weeping
    over Victor. The monster tells Walton of his
    immense solitude, suffering, hatred, and remorse.
    He asserts that now that his creator has died, he
    too can end his suffering. The monster then
    departs for the northernmost ice to die

9
Review
  • Self Assessment What percentage do you think
    you would get now, if you re-sat the sparknotes
    quiz?
  • Homework resit the test

10
Frankenstein The Narrative Viewpoint
  • Goal To understand the complex narrative
    viewpoint of the text, and explore the effects
    this creates

What thinkst thou? The lesson entitled thus the
goal shouldst be?
11
Narrative Voice One Walton
  • To Mrs. Saville, England
  • ST. PETERSBURGH, Dec. 11, 17--.
  • You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has
    accompanied the commencement of an enterprise
    which you have regarded with such evil
    forebodings. I arrived here yesterday and my
    first task is to assure my dear sister of my
    welfare, and increasing confidence in the success
    of my undertaking.
  • I am already far north of London and as I walk
    in the streets of Petersburgh, I feel a cold
    northern breeze play upon my cheeks, which braces
    my nerves, and fills me with delight. Do you
    understand this feeling? This breeze, which has
    travelled from the regions towards which I am
    advancing, gives me a foretaste of those icy
    climes. Inspirited by this wind of promise, my
    day dreams become more fervent and vivid. I try
    in vain to be persuaded that the pole is the seat
    of frost and desolation it ever presents itself
    to my imagination as the region of beauty and
    delight. There, Margaret, the sun is for ever
    visible its broad disk just skirting the
    horizon, and diffusing a perpetual splendour.
    There--for with your leave, my sister, I will put
    some trust in preceding navigators--there snow
    and frost are banished and, sailing over a calm
    sea, we may be wafted to a land surpassing in
    wonders and in beauty every region hitherto
    discovered on the habitable globe. Its
    productions and features may be without example,
    as the phenomena of the heavenly bodies
    undoubtedly are in those undiscovered solitudes.
    What may not be expected in a country of eternal
    light? I may there discover the wondrous power
    which attracts the needle and may regulate a
    thousand celestial observations, that require
    only this voyage to render their seeming
    eccentricities consistent for ever.

What is Walton like? How does he parallel
Victor? How does he act as foil to Victor?
12
Waltons Conclusion
  • I was at first touched by the expressions of his
    misery yet, when I called to mind what
    Frankenstein had said of his powers of eloquence
    and persuasion, and when I again cast my eyes on
    the lifeless form of my friend, indignation was
    rekindled within me. "Wretch!" I said, "it is
    well that you come here to whine over the
    desolation that you have made. You throw a torch
    into a pile of buildings and when they are
    consumed you sit among the ruins and lament the
    fall. Hypocritical fiend! if he whom you mourn
    still lived, still would he be the object, again
    would he become the prey, of your accursed
    vengeance. It is not pity that you feel you
    lament only because the victim of your malignity
    is withdrawn from your power."

What is Waltons view of the monster? How does
he parallel Victor in this? How does this
(perhaps) help to inform the reader of Shelleys
view?
13
Narrative Voice Two Victor
Why does Shelley have Victor a member of such a
noble family? Is he a mad obsessive, or a noble
seeker of enlightenment, destroyed by fate?
  • I am by birth a Genevese and my family is one of
    the most distinguished of that republic. My
    ancestors had been for many years counsellors and
    syndics and my father had filled several public
    situations with honour and reputation. He was
    respected by all who knew him for his integrity
    and indefatigable attention to public business.
    He passed his younger days perpetually occupied
    by the affairs of his country a variety of
    circumstances had prevented his marrying early,
    nor was it until the decline of life that he
    became a husband and the father of a family.
  • As the circumstances of his marriage illustrate
    his character, I cannot refrain from relating
    them. One of his most intimate friends was a
    merchant, who, from a flourishing state, fell,
    through numerous mischances, into poverty. This
    man, whose name was Beaufort, was of a proud and
    unbending disposition, and could not bear to live
    in poverty and oblivion in the same country where
    he had formerly been distinguished for his rank
    and magnificence. Having paid his debts,
    therefore, in the most honourable manner, he
    retreated with his daughter to the town of
    Lucerne, where he lived unknown and in
    wretchedness. My father loved Beaufort with the
    truest friendship, and was deeply grieved by his
    retreat in these unfortunate circumstances. He
    bitterly deplored the false pride which led his
    friend to a conduct so little worthy of the
    affection that united them. He lost no time in
    endeavouring to seek him out, with the hope of
    persuading him to begin the world again through
    his credit and assistance.

14
Victor after Creating the Creature
How does the reader react to Victors account of
the monster when reading this? What do we think
of Victors response?
  • I trembled excessively I could not endure to
    think of, and far less to allude to, the
    occurrences of the preceding night. I walked with
    a quick pace, and we soon arrived at my college.
    I then reflected, and the thought made me shiver,
    that the creature whom I had left in my apartment
    might still be there, alive, and walking about. I
    dreaded to behold this monster but I feared
    still more that Henry should see him. Entreating
    him, therefore, to remain a few minutes at the
    bottom of the stairs, I darted up towards my own
    room. My hand was already on the lock of the door
    before I recollected myself. I then paused and a
    cold shivering came over me. I threw the door
    forcibly open, as children are accustomed to do
    when they expect a spectre to stand in waiting
    for them on the other side but nothing appeared.
    I stepped fearfully in the apartment was empty
    and my bedroom was also freed from its hideous
    guest. I could hardly believe that so great a
    good fortune could have befallen me but when I
    became assured that my enemy had indeed fled, I
    clapped my hands for joy, and ran down to
    Clerval.
  • We ascended into my room, and the servant
    presently brought breakfast but I was unable to
    contain myself. It was not joy only that
    possessed me I felt my flesh tingle with excess
    of sensitiveness, and my pulse beat rapidly. I
    was unable to remain for a single instant in the
    same place I jumped over the chairs, clapped my
    hands, and laughed aloud. Clerval at first
    attributed my unusual spirits to joy on his
    arrival but when he observed me more attentively
    he saw a wildness in my eyes for which he could
    not account and my loud, unrestrained, heartless
    laughter, frightened and astonished him.

15
Victors Last Words
  • Oh! when will my guiding spirit, in conducting me
    to the daemon, allow me the rest I so much
    desire or must I die and he yet live? If I do,
    swear to me, Walton, that he shall not escape
    that you will seek him and satisfy my vengeance
    in his death. And do I dare to ask of you to
    undertake my pilgrimage, to endure the hardships
    that I have undergone? No I am not so selfish.
    Yet, when I am dead, if he should appear if the
    ministers of vengeance should conduct him to you,
    swear that he shall not live--swear that he shall
    not triumph over my accumulated woes, and survive
    to add to the list of his dark crimes. He is
    eloquent and persuasive and once his words had
    even power over my heart but trust him not. His
    soul is as hellish as his form, full of treachery
    and fiendlike malice. Hear him not call on the
    names of William, Justine, Clerval, Elizabeth, my
    father, and of the wretched Victor, and thrust
    your sword into his heart. I will hover near and
    direct the steel aright.
  • Yet I cannot ask you to renounce your country
    and friends to fulfil this task and now that you
    are returning to England you will have little
    chance of meeting with him. But the consideration
    of these points, and the well balancing of what
    you may esteem your duties, I leave to you my
    judgment and ideas are already disturbed by the
    near approach of death. I dare not ask you to do
    what I think right, for I may still be misled by
    passion.
  • "That he should live to be an instrument of
    mischief disturbs me in other respects, this
    hour, when I momentarily expect my release, is
    the only happy one which I have enjoyed for
    several years. The forms of the beloved dead flit
    before me and I hasten to their arms. Farewell,
    Walton! Seek happiness in tranquillity and avoid
    ambition, even if it be only the apparently
    innocent one of distinguishing yourself in
    science and discoveries. Yet why do I say this? I
    have myself been blasted in these hopes, yet
    another may succeed."

What sympathy does the reader have for Victor
here?
16
Victor to Waltons Crew
  • "What do you mean? What do you demand of your
    captain? Are you then so easily turned from your
    design? Did you not call this a glorious
    expedition? And wherefore was it glorious? Not
    because the way was smooth and placid as a
    southern sea, but because it was full of dangers
    and terror because at every new incident your
    fortitude was to be called forth and your courage
    exhibited because danger and death surrounded
    it, and these you were to brave and overcome. For
    this was it a glorious, for this was it an
    honourable undertaking. You were hereafter to be
    hailed as the benefactors of your species your
    names adored as belonging to brave men who
    encountered death for honour and the benefit of
    mankind. And now, behold, with the first
    imagination of danger, or, if you will, the first
    mighty and terrific trial of your courage, you
    shrink away, and are content to be handed down as
    men who had not strength enough to endure cold
    and peril and so, poor souls, they were chilly
    and returned to their warm firesides. Why that
    requires not this preparation ye need not have
    come thus far, and dragged your captain to the
    shame of a defeat, merely to prove yourselves
    cowards. Oh! be men, or be more than men. Be
    steady to your purposes and firm as a rock. This
    ice is not made of such stuff as your hearts may
    be it is mutable and cannot withstand you if you
    say that it shall not. Do not return to your
    families with the stigma of disgrace marked on
    your brows. Return as heroes who have fought and
    conquered, and who know not what it is to turn
    their backs on the foe."
  • He spoke this with a voice so modulated to the
    different feelings expressed in his speech, with
    an eye so full of lofty design and heroism, that
    can you wonder that these men were moved? They
    looked at one another and were unable to reply. I
    spoke I told them to retire and consider of what
    had been said that I would not lead them farther
    north if they strenuously desired the contrary
    but that I hoped that, with reflection, their
    courage would return.
  • They retired, and I turned towards my friend but
    he was sunk in languor and almost deprived of
    life.

How does this incident shape the readers view of
Victor?
17
Narrative Voice Three The Creature
  • "It is with considerable difficulty that I
    remember the original era of my being all the
    events of that period appear confused and
    indistinct. A strange multiplicity of sensations
    seized me, and I saw, felt, heard, and smelt, at
    the same time and it was, indeed, a long time
    before I learned to distinguish between the
    operations of my various senses. By degrees, I
    remember, a stronger light pressed upon my
    nerves, so that I was obliged to shut my eyes.
    Darkness then came over me, and troubled me but
    hardly had I felt this, when, by opening my eyes,
    as I now suppose, the light poured in upon me
    again. I walked, and, I believe, descended but I
    presently found a great alteration in my
    sensations. Before, dark and opaque bodies had
    surrounded me, impervious to my touch or sight
    but I now found that I could wander on at
    liberty, with no obstacles which I could not
    either surmount or avoid. The light became more
    and more oppressive to me and, the heat wearying
    me as I walked, I sought a place where I could
    receive shade. This was the forest near
    Ingolstadt and here I lay by the side of a brook
    resting from my fatigue, until I felt tormented
    by hunger and thirst. This roused me from my
    nearly dormant state, and I ate some berries
    which I found hanging on the trees, or lying on
    the ground. I slaked my thirst at the brook and
    then lying down, was overcome by sleep.

How does the change of narrative voice here
affect the readers response to earlier events?
18
The Monsters Final Words
  • "Farewell! I leave you, and in you the last of
    human kind whom these eyes will ever behold.
    Farewell, Frankenstein! If thou wert yet alive,
    and yet cherished a desire of revenge against me,
    it would be better satiated in my life than in my
    destruction. But it was not so thou didst seek
    my extinction that I might not cause greater
    wretchedness and if yet, in some mode unknown to
    me, thou hast not ceased to think and feel, thou
    wouldst not desire against me a vengeance greater
    than that which I feel. Blasted as thou wert, my
    agony was still superior to thine for the bitter
    sting of remorse will not cease to rankle in my
    wounds until death shall close them for ever.
  • "But soon," he cried, with sad and solemn
    enthusiasm, "I shall die, and what I now feel be
    no longer felt. Soon these burning miseries will
    be extinct. I shall ascend my funeral pile
    triumphantly, and exult in the agony of the
    torturing flames. The light of that conflagration
    will fade away my ashes will be swept into the
    sea by the winds. My spirit will sleep in peace
    or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus.
    Farewell."
  • What does Victor think of the creature?
  • What does Walton think of the creature?
  • What does the creature think of himself?

19
What is the point?
  • The technique of framing narratives within
    narratives not only allows the reader to hear the
    voices of all of the main characters, but also
    provides multiple views of the central
    characters.
  • Walton sees Frankenstein as a noble, tragic
    figure
  • Frankenstein sees himself as an overly proud and
    overly ambitious victim of fate
  • the monster sees Frankenstein as a reckless
    creator, too self-centered to care for his
    creation.
  • Similarly, while Walton and Frankenstein deem the
    monster a malevolent, insensitive brute, the
    monster casts himself as a martyred classical
    hero I shall ascend my funeral pile
    triumphantly and exult in the agony of the
    torturing flames, he says.
  • Which of these views do you think is most in line
    with Mary Shelleys??

20
Consolidation
  • Create a diagram which shows the narrative
    structure
  • Include some way of demonstrating the effects
    this structure creates

21
Frankenstein The Protagonist
  • Goal To identify the main characteristics of the
    Victor, and analyse how theyre constructed.
  • Starter 1.3 Practice
  • ABCD for F One feature for each category only.
  • Character Quotations what is suggested by each?
  • SXY Essay Time Go Go Go!

22
Extract for Chapter 22
  • What then became of me? I know not. I lost
    sensation, and chains and darkness were the only
    objects that pressed upon me. Sometimes, indeed,
    I dreamt that I wandered in flowery meadows and
    pleasant vales with the friends of my youth but
    I awoke, and found myself in a dungeon.
    Melancholy followed, but by degrees I gained a
    clear conception of my miseries and situation,
    and was then released from my prison. For they
    had called me mad and during many months, as I
    understood, a solitary cell had been my
    habitation.
  • Liberty, however, had been an useless gift to me
    had I not, as I awakened to reason, at the same
    time awakened to revenge. As the memory of past
    misfortunes pressed upon me, I began to reflect
    on their cause--the monster whom I had created,
    the miserable daemon whom I had sent abroad into
    the world for my destruction. I was possessed by
    a maddening rage when I thought of him, and
    desired and ardently prayed that I might have him
    within my grasp to wreak a great and signal
    revenge on his cursed head.
  • Nor did my hate long confine itself to useless
    wishes I began to reflect on the best means of
    securing him and for this purpose, about a month
    after my release, I repaired to a criminal judge
    in the town, and told him that I had an
    accusation to make that I knew the destroyer of
    my family and that I required him to exert his
    whole authority for the apprehension of the
    murderer.
  • Identify the metaphor in the second paragraph.
    Explain how it adds to your understanding of
    Victor
  • What has he become? How has he changed?

23
Victor Quotations
  • It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I
    desired to learn Victor Frankenstein
  • Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which
    I should first break through, and pour a torrent
    of light into our dark world.
  • A new species would bless me as its creator and
    source many happy and excellent natures would
    owe their being to me. Victor Frankenstein
  • I beheld the wretch, the miserable monster whom
    I had created Victor Frankenstein
  • One by one, my friends were snatched away, I was
    left desolate. Victor Frankenstein
  • Seek happiness in tranquility and avoid
    ambition Victor Frankenstein
  • But I am a blasted tree the bolt has entered my
    soul and I felt then that I should survive to
    exhibit what I shall soon cease to be--a
    miserable spectacle of wrecked humanity, pitiable
    to others and intolerable to myself.
  • Yet at the idea that the fiend should live and be
    triumphant, my rage and vengeance returned, and,
    like a mighty tide, overwhelmed every other
    feeling. After a slight repose, during which the
    spirits of the dead hovered round and instigated
    me to toil and revenge, I prepared for my
    journey.

24
Choose One
  • Describe an important change that happened to ONE
    character or individual in the text. Explain why
    this change was important.
  • Describe an important character or individual in
    the text. Explain why he or she was important in
    the text.
  • Planning Model
  • Plan then write!!

You get better at writing essays by writing
essays For this unit you will complete six
essays I will choose one to mark You will
choose one to be marked A random one will be
chosen to be marked by a panel of your
peers Keep them all together!!!!!
25
(No Transcript)
26
Frankenstein The Monster
  • Goal To explore key aspects of the development
    of the monster and how our sympathies change
  • Starter 1.6 Practice
  • How can I describe my emotions at this
    catastrophe, or how delineate the wretch whom
    with such infinite pains and care I had
    endeavoured to form? His limbs were in
    proportion, and I had selected his features as
    beautiful. Beautiful!--Great God! His yellow skin
    scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries
    beneath his hair was of a lustrous black, and
    flowing his teeth of a pearly whiteness but
    these luxuriances only formed a more horrid
    contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost
    of the same colour as the dun white sockets in
    which they were set, his shrivelled complexion
    and straight black lips.
  • Identify a language feature used in the above
    extract.
  • Explain what impression of the monster it creates

27
Branaghs vision
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vjzAH150Ush8feature
    related
  • How does this differ from the novel? Is it more
    or less effective? Why?
  • Intelligent debate time
  • Proposition That Branaghs version of the
    Monsters acquirement of language is more
    effective than Shelleys. ALL to contribute!!!!

28
Quotation Sheet Part Two
  • I was benevolent my soul glowed with love and
    humanity but am I not alone, miserably
    alone? Monster
  • I ought to be thy Adam but I am rather the
    fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no
    misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I
    alone am irrevocably excluded.
  • I, the miserable and the abandoned, am an
    abortion, to be spurned at, and kicked, and
    trampled on.
  • Am I to be thought the only criminal, when all
    humankind sinned against me? Monster
  • "I am alone and miserable man will not associate
    with me but one as deformed and horrible as
    myself would not deny herself to me. My companion
    must be of the same species and have the same
    defects. This being you must create.
  • Have a care I will work at your destruction, nor
    finish until I desolate your heart, so that you
    shall curse the hour of your birth Monster
  • I shall be with you on your wedding
    night Monster
  • Farewell, Frankenstein! If thou wert yet alive,
    and yet cherished a desire of revenge against me,
    it would be better satiated in my life than in my
    destruction

29
Choose The Other One
  • Describe an important change that happened to ONE
    character or individual in the text. Explain why
    this change was important.
  • Describe an important character or individual in
    the text. Explain why he or she was important in
    the text.
  • Plan then write!!

30
Theme Monstrosity
  • Goal To explore the presentation of this theme.
  • Starter Three Halves Debate
  • Consider the viewpoints on the following slide.
    You can choose to side with one or the other, or
    be undecided, and stay in the centre of the room.
  • Groups on either side your job is to convince
    others to join you.
  • One speaker per round.
  • No rebuttal on first round.
  • Different speaker each round

31
Views On Monstrosity
  • Andrew Lamb I think that Frankenstein is more
    monstrous than the daemon because if Victor had
    not created the daemon, then the daemon would not
    have ever been born and have the chance to become
    a monstourous daemon through his actions. This in
    my opinion makes Frankenstein more of a monster
    than the actual monster. I also think that if
    Victor had not abandoned the daemon, yet cared
    for him and been his companion, then the daemon
    would have had a better, more stable personality
    and he would not have committed such violent acts
    that he did
  • James Hanff I would have to say that the
    Creation is more monstorous than Frankenstein. He
    murdered or caused the death of four people three
    of which he murered with his bare hand. I believe
    is very monstorous and hard to top. I believe
    that Frankenstein had periods in his life where
    he was mad and very emotionally unfit to cope
    with his actions rather than acting like a
    monster and this caused him to neglect his
    creation and allow it to turn into a monster.

32
Monstrosity from sparknotes
  • Reduce, refine, put into your own words
  •  
  • Obviously, this theme pervades the entire novel,
    as the monster lies at the center of the action.
    Eight feet tall and hideously ugly, the monster
    is rejected by society. However, his monstrosity
    results not only from his grotesque appearance
    but also from the unnatural manner of his
    creation, which involves the secretive animation
    of a mix of stolen body parts and strange
    chemicals. He is a product not of collaborative
    scientific effort but of dark, supernatural
    workings.
  •  
  • The monster is only the most literal of a number
    of monstrous entities in the novel, including the
    knowledge that Victor used to create the monster
    (see Dangerous Knowledge). One can argue that
    Victor himself is a kind of monster, as his
    ambition, secrecy, and selfishness alienate him
    from human society. Ordinary on the outside, he
    may be the true monster inside, as he is
    eventually consumed by an obsessive hatred of his
    creation. Finally, many critics have described
    the novel itself as monstrous, a
    stitched-together combination of different
    voices, texts, and tenses (see Texts).

33
Sample Essay Question
  • Describe an important idea
  • Explain why it was worth reading about.
  • WHY WAS IT WORTH READING ABOUT??
  • Group Competition the best possible SXY P
    go!!!
  • Feedback

34
Frankenstein Purpose
  • Goal To consider Mary Shelleys purpose in
    writing this text, and provide key examples to
    support this.
  • Starter 1.6 Practice
  • Discussion Dangerous knowledge??
  • Interviewing Mary Shelley

35
Meeting Mary Shelley.
  • Int Frankenstein contains two narrators who are
    seemingly obsessed by knowledge and discovery.
    What were you trying to achieve through this
    device?
  • MS One of my central purposes in writing
    Frankenstein was to warn
  • Role Play time!!

36
Dangerous Knowledge
  • To what extent is the exploration of the idea of
    dangerous knowledge Mary Shelleys purpose in
    Frankenstein?
  • The pursuit of knowledge is at the heart of
    Frankenstein, as Victor attempts to surge beyond
    accepted human limits and access the secret of
    life. Likewise, Robert Walton attempts to surpass
    previous human explorations by endeavoring to
    reach the North Pole. This ruthless pursuit of
    knowledge, of the light, proves dangerous, as
    Victor's act of creation eventually results in
    the destruction of everyone dear to him, and
    Walton finds himself perilously trapped between
    sheets of ice. Whereas Victor's obsessive hatred
    of the monster drives him to his death, Walton
    ultimately pulls back from his treacherous
    mission, having learned from Victor's example how
    destructive the thirst for knowledge can be.
  • Think also of blasphemy and hubris
  • Draw parallels with atomic energy, perhaps GE?
    More?

37
From Waltons Letters
  • He is now much recovered from his illness, and is
    continually on the deck, apparently watching for
    the sledge that preceded his own. Yet, although
    unhappy, he is not so utterly occupied by his own
    misery but that he interests himself deeply in
    the projects of others. He has frequently
    conversed with me on mine, which I have
    communicated to him without disguise. He entered
    attentively into all my arguments in favour of my
    eventual success, and into every minute detail of
    the measures I had taken to secure it. I was
    easily led by the sympathy which he evinced to
    use the language of my heart to give utterance
    to the burning ardour of my soul and to say,
    with all the fervour that warmed me, how gladly I
    would sacrifice my fortune, my existence, my
    every hope, to the furtherance of my enterprise.
    One man's life or death were but a small price to
    pay for the acquirement of the knowledge which I
    sought for the dominion I should acquire and
    transmit over the elemental foes of our race. As
    I spoke, a dark gloom spread over my listener's
    countenance. At first I perceived that he tried
    to suppress his emotion he placed his hands
    before his eyes and my voice quivered and failed
    me, as I beheld tears trickle fast from between
    his fingers--a groan burst from his heaving
    breast. I paused--at length he spoke, in broken
    accents-- "Unhappy man! Do you share my madness?
    Have you drank also of the intoxicating draught?
    Hear me--let me reveal my tale, and you will dash
    the cup from your lips!"
  • Identify a language feature used in the section
    in bold.
  • Explain how it helps you to better understand a
    character.

38
  • "You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once
    did and I ardently hope that the gratification
    of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you,
    as mine has been."Mary ShelleyFrankenstein
  • Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which
    I should first break through, and pour a torrent
    of light into our dark world.Mary
    ShelleyFrankenstein
  • . . . the moon gazed on my midnight labours,
    while, with unrelaxed and breathless eagerness, I
    pursued nature to her hiding-places.Mary
    ShelleyFrankenstein
  • The agony of my feelings allowed me no respite
    no incident occurred from which my rage and
    misery could not extract its food . . .Mary
    ShelleyFrankenstein
  • to me. My companion must be of the same species
    and have the same defects. This being you must
    create.
  • But I am a blasted tree the bolt has entered my
    soul and I felt then that I should survive to
    exhibit what I shall soon cease to be--a
    miserable spectacle of wrecked humanity, pitiable
    to others and intolerable to myself.Mary
    ShelleyFrankenstein
  • Be men, or be more than men. Be steady to your
    purposes and firm as a rock. This ice is not made
    of such stuff as your hearts may be it is
    mutable and cannot withstand you if you say that
    it shall not.Mary ShelleyFrankenstein
  • My heart was fashioned to be susceptible of love
    and sympathy, and when wrenched by misery to vice
    and hatred, it did not endure the violence of the
    change without torture such as you cannot even
    imagine.

39
Frankenstein Peer Review
  • Goal To critically analyse peers essays, and
    reflect on your own, in order to clarify how to
    make improvements.
  • Starter What themes follow through the
    assessment criteria?

40
Critical Friend Time
  • The Criteria
  • Read the exemplars youve been given
  • Read your essay aloud to your group
  • 4 WWWs
  • 3 Ebis
  • One Grade

41
Victors Voice
  • What do each of the following suggest about his
    character?
  • Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which
    I should first break through, and pour a torrent
    of light into our dark world.
  • So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of
    Frankensteinmore, far more, will I achieve
    treading in the steps already marked, I will
    pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and
    unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of
    creation.
  • It was already one in the morning the rain
    pattered dismally against the panes, and my
    candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer
    of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull
    yellow eye of the creature open . .

42
Frankenstein Setting
  • Goal To analyse the effect the setting of the
    novel has had upon the themes and
    characterisation.
  • Starter Come up with the BEST possible
    definition
  • The Age of Enlightenment
  • The Age or Romanticism
  • Dealing with the question
  • Fun time

43
Age of Enlightenment
  • Of the basic assumptions and beliefs common to
    philosophers and intellectuals of this period,
    perhaps the most important was an abiding faith
    in the power of human reason. The age was
    enormously impressed by the discovery by Isaac
    Newton of universal gravitation. If humanity
    could so unlock the laws of the universe, Gods
    own laws, why could it not also discover the laws
    underlying all of nature and society? This belief
    was summed up by Alexander Pope Nature and
    natures laws lay hid in night, / God said, Let
    Newton be, and all was light.
  • Enlightenment thinkers placed a great premium on
    the discovery of truth through the observation of
    nature, rather than through the study of
    authoritative sources, such as Aristotle and the
    Bible. If the centuries-old medieval view of the
    physical world had been so decisively overthrown
    by reason, then the antiquity of an idea, or
    indeed of a law, a privilege, or a form of
    government, could no longer be seen as a
    guarantee of its worth.

44
Romanticism
  • Romanticism is a complex artistic, literary, and
    intellectual movement that originated in the
    second half of the 18th century in Western
    Europe, and gained strength during the Industrial
    Revolution.1 It was partly a revolt against
    aristocratic social and political norms of the
    Age of Enlightenment and a reaction against the
    scientific rationalization of nature and was
    embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music,
    and literature.
  • The movement stressed strong emotion as a source
    of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on
    such emotions as trepidation, horror and
    aweespecially that which is experienced in
    confronting the sublimity of untamed nature and
    its picturesque qualities, both new aesthetic
    categories. It elevated folk art and custom to
    something noble, and argued for a "natural"
    epistemology of human activities as conditioned
    by nature in the form of language, custom and
    usage.
  • Our modern sense of a romantic character is
    sometimes based on Byronic or Romantic ideals.
    Romanticism reached beyond the rational and
    Classicist ideal models to elevate medievalism
    and elements of art and narrative perceived to be
    authentically medieval, in an attempt to escape
    the confines of population growth, urban sprawl
    and industrialism, and it also attempted to
    embrace the exotic, unfamiliar and distant in
    modes more authentic than chinoiserie, harnessing
    the power of the imagination to envision and to
    escape.

45
Setting Question
  • Describe an important setting from the text.
  • (Note setting can be a time or a place)
  • Explain how this setting helped to develop an
    important idea or ideas
  • Shared Plan
  • Fun Time!!!

46
Frankenstein Key Moments
  • Goal To analyse how key moments affect the
    development of ideas and characters.
  • Starter Group discussion what are the three
    single most important events in the text? Be
    prepared to justify each choice.

47
Key Moment Its Alive!
  • Chapter Five http//www.literature.org/authors/she
    lley-mary/frankenstein/chapter-05.html
  • Notes use the following headings in a mind-map
    to jot notes as we read to clarify the
    importance of this moment
  • Monstrosity
  • Dangerous Knowledge
  • Characterisation Victor
  • Characterisation The Monster
  • Reader response manipulation of sympathies

48
Exploring Importance
  • Describe an important Moment
  • Explain how it helped develop an
  • important idea or ideas
  • Shared plan
  • Collective Essay Competition
  • Two halves of a class
  • Section allocation
  • Publication and feedback

49
Key Moment Two It Speaks
  • Goal To consider the significance of the
    beginning of the Monsters Narrative and the
    effect this has on the reader.
  • Starter 1.6 Practice
  • Reading The beginning of the Monsters Narrative
    http//www.literature.org/authors/shelley-mary/fra
    nkenstein/chapter-11.html

50
Identify a language feature used in the section
in bold. Explain how it contributes to the mood
of the passage
  • He approached his countenance bespoke bitter
    anguish, combined with disdain and malignity,
    while its unearthly ugliness rendered it almost
    too horrible for human eyes. But I scarcely
    observed this rage and hatred had at first
    deprived me of utterance, and I recovered only to
    overwhelm him with words expressive of furious
    detestation and contempt.
  • "Devil," I exclaimed, "do you dare approach me?
    and do not you fear the fierce vengeance of my
    arm wreaked on your miserable head? Begone, vile
    insect! or rather, stay, that I may trample you
    to dust! and, oh! that I could, with the
    extinction of your miserable existence, restore
    those victims whom you have so diabolically
    murdered!"
  • "I expected this reception," said the daemon.
    "All men hate the wretched how, then, must I be
    hated, who am miserable beyond all living things!
    Yet you, my creator, detest and spurn me, thy
    creature, to whom thou art bound by ties only
    dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us. You
    purpose to kill me. How dare you sport thus with
    life? Do your duty towards me, and I will do mine
    towards you and the rest of mankind. If you will
    comply with my conditions, I will leave them and
    you at peace but if you refuse, I will glut the
    maw of death, until it be satiated with the blood
    of your remaining friends."
  • "Abhorred monster! fiend that thou art! the
    tortures of hell are too mild a vengeance for thy
    crimes. Wretched devil! you reproach me with your
    creation come on, then, that I may extinguish
    the spark which I so negligently bestowed." My
    rage was without bounds I sprang on him,
    impelled by all the feelings which can arm one
    being against the existence of another.
  • He easily eluded me, and said--

51
How do the following quotations shape the
readers response to The Monster?
Quotation Significance
I was a poor, helpless, miserable wretch I knew, and could distinguish, nothing but feeling pain invade me on all sides, I sat down and wept. I was delighted when I first discovered that a pleasant sound, which often saluted my ears, proceeded from the throats of the little winged animals who had often intercepted the light from my eyes. "Here the hovel next to the cottage then I retreated, and lay down happy to have found a shelter, however miserable, from the inclemency of the season, and still more from the barbarity of man. He raised her, and smiled with such kindness and affection that I felt sensations of a peculiar and overpowering nature they were a mixture of pain and pleasure, such as I had never before experienced, either from hunger or cold, warmth or food and I withdrew from the window, unable to bear these emotions.
52
Review Two characters, one novelist and a reader
  • Create 3 Tableaux showing aspects of this scene
  • You can choose to show the monster telling his
    tale to Victor, or Aspects of the Monsters
    Narrative
  • Two of you will be participant.
  • One of you will be Mary Shelley, and explain what
    your intention was in including this detail in
    the text
  • The last one of you will be the reader you will
    explain how you responded to the event.
  • Go GO GO !!!

53
Frankenstein Group Seminar
  • Goal To begin to plan and allocate tasks for a
    seminar on a given aspect of the text.
  • Starter Recap what literary aspects of the
    novel have we examined thus far??
  • Seminar Task Topic Setting Choose your topic.
  • Only one group can present each topic.
  • Your topic must include a title and focussing
    question

54
Seminar Requirements
  • Must use visual and verbal communication
  • Must include a brief written activity and the
    facilitation of feedback from your audience
    (Cloze paragraph, multi-choice, T/F, short answer
    worksheet, crossword puzzle online programs
    will do this for you)
  • Every member of the group must speak
  • Each member must have a specific aspect of the
    topic to focus upon.
  • Seminars can be no longer than 15 minutes,
    including the student activity.
  • Total Credit Value 0

55
Seminar Prep
  • Select Topic
  • Allocate aspects
  • Allocate Tasks Create powerpoint, make up
    worksheet etc.
  • Draft an outline plan that EACH member of the
    group will have in their book
  • Go GO GO!!

56
1.3 Assessment One
  • Step One look through your previous essays for
    1.4 and 1.5. Write any key targets you have
    use the resource of your memory too what do you
    need to do better when writing essays?
  • Planning Time 10 Minutes
  • Writing Time 30 Minutes 500 Words Go Go GO!!!!!
  • Self assessment give yourself a grade and some
    feedback
  • 4 WWWs
  • 2 EBIs

57
Timed Essay One
  • TOPICS (Choose ONE)
  • 1. Describe an important change that happened to
    ONE character or individual in the text. Explain
    why this change was important.
  • 2. Describe an important event at (or near) the
    end of the text. Explain how this event helped
    you understand an idea (or ideas) in the text.
  • 3. Describe an idea (or ideas) in the text that
    you found interesting. Explain why you found this
    idea (or ideas) interesting.
  • 4. Describe an important character or individual
    in the text. Explain why he or she was important
    in the text.
  • 5. Describe at least TWO techniques used to make
    a character or individual in the text
    interesting. Explain why these techniques made
    the character or individual interesting.
  • Note Techniques could include language,
    structure and / or narrative point-of-view.
  • 6. Describe an important aspect of setting in the
    text. Explain how it helped you understand a key
    idea (or ideas) in the text.
  • Note Setting may refer to time and / or
    place.

58
Seminar Presentations
  • Goal To use a variety of presentation techniques
    to communicate effectively
  • To provide well considered, sensitive,
    constructive feedback
  • Starter Socratic Feedback who was Socrates?

59
Socratic Discussion key points A bunch of you
will talk A bunch of you will listen None of you
will wear togas.
60
What is a Socratic Discussion?
  • A group will perform the seminar on their given
    aspect of the text
  • Other groups will be allocated an aspect to
    observe and make notes on as the seminar
    progresses.
  • The clarity and relevance and validity of the
    main points of the seminar
  • The co-ordination and effectiveness of the
    learning activity
  • The interaction of the group when presenting
  • The quality and effectiveness of visual aids
  • The quality and effectiveness of the speakers
    presentation
  • The achieving of purpose hoe effectively did it
    help you learn???
  • Each group should come up with 4WWWs and 2 EBIs
  • All feedback to be delivered in the first person
    plural (We, us, our )
  • At least two groups will be asked to share their
    feedback at the end.
  • Each round will mean a new aspect upon which to
    focus.

61
1.3 Assessment Two
  • Step One look through your previous essays for
    1.3. Write any key targets you have use the
    resource of your memory too what do you need to
    do better when writing essays?
  • Planning Time 10 Minutes
  • Writing Time 30 Minutes 500 Words Go Go GO!!!!!
  • Self assessment give yourself a grade and some
    feedback
  • 4 WWWs
  • 2 EBIs

62
Assessment Two TOPICS (Choose ONE)
  • 1. Describe a positive OR negative experience
    that happened to a character or individual in the
  • text.
  • Explain how the writer used the experience to
    help you understand that character or individual.
  • 2. Describe an event that was a turning point in
    the text.
  • Explain why the turning point was important.
  • 3. Describe at least ONE technique in the text
    that helped make the writers idea(s) clear to
    you.
  • Explain why the technique made the writers
    idea(s) clear to you.
  • Note Techniques might be language, style,
    structure or narrative point-of-view.
  • 4. Describe a character or individual in the text
    whom you found interesting.
  • Explain how the writer made the character or
    individual interesting to you.
  • 5. Describe at least ONE way that time and / or
    place were used in the text.
  • Explain why the time and / or place were
    important.
  • 6. Describe at least ONE idea that you thought
    was important in the text.
  • Explain how the writer made you think the idea
    was important.

63
Assessment Feedback WWW
  • Good use of literary and analytical language
  • Sustained and complex points made
  • A good sense of relating points to the authors
    purpose
  • Excellent Planning Good knowledge of the story
    line
  • Good Length
  • Responsive and thoughtful comments made
  • Perceptive and original ideas offered
  • A very good understanding of the text shown
  • Very well structured SXY paragraphs
  • Very good use of examples and quotations as
    evidence
  • Excellent links to the major themes of the text
  • Detailed analysis, exploring layers of meaning

64
Assessment Feedback WWW
  1. Good knowledge of the story line
  2. Good Length
  3. Responsive and thoughtful comments made
  4. Perceptive and original ideas offered
  5. A very good understanding of the text shown
  6. Very well structured SXY paragraphs
  7. Very good use of examples and quotations as
    evidence
  8. Excellent links to the major themes of the text
  9. Detailed analysis, exploring layers of meaning
  10. Good use of literary and analytical language
  11. Sustained and complex points made
  12. A good sense of relating points to the authors
    purpose
  13. Excellent Planning

65
  1. Make sure your choice of quotation suits the
    point youre making
  2. Respond to the exact demands of the question if
    it asks for a challenge/relationship, idea etc,
    write about one
  3. Tie your argument back to the question by
    reiterating the key words IMPORTANT HERE
  4. Be sure to briefly explain what is happening in a
    quotation
  5. Make sure you are clear in answering the first
    part of the question
  6. Revise SXY paragraph structure and use it
    consistently
  7. Use a formal style when writing essays
  8. Be careful to be accurate when giving an example
    of an incident from the story
  9. Use quotations as evidence frequently try to
    weave in two or three very brief quotations in
    every paragraph
  10. Develop the you analyse part of sxy paragraphs
    more by using connectives such as moreover to
    expand your comments
  11. Aim for at least four detailed and developed
    paragraphs, as well as a brief intro and
    conclusion
  12. Answer both parts of the question dont forget
    to describe using the 5ws and 1h..
  13. Avoid repeating quotations or ideas
  14. Try to make more links to the authors purpose be
    clear in showing you understand that the author
    is trying to manipulate the readers response
  15. Strive to be critically appreciative show that
    you understand how effective the writers
    techniques and ideas are.
  16. Aim to move beyond the text make references to
    the social and historical context, and Shelleys
    purpose of criticism of the age of enlightenment
    ,
  17. Draw frequent, specific examples from the text
    avoid writing to generally about the ideas
  18. Greater care with written accuracy needed.
  19. Revise the rules of the academic voice and use
    them consistently

66
  • Make sure your choice of quotation suits the
    point youre making
  • Aim for at least three detailed and developed
    paragraphs, as well as a brief intro and
    conclusion
  • Answer both parts of the question dont forget
    to describe using the 5ws and 1h..
  • Avoid repeating quotations or ideas
  • Try to make more links to the authors purpose be
    clear in showing you understand that the author
    is trying to manipulate the readers response
  • Strive to be critically appreciative show that
    you understand how effective the writers
    techniques and ideas are.
  • Aim to move beyond the text make references to
    the social and historical context, and Shelleys
    purpose of criticism of the age of enlightenment
    ,
  • Draw frequent, specific examples from the text
    avoid writing to generally about the ideas
  • Greater care with written accuracy needed.
  • Respond to the exact demands of the question if
    it asks for a challenge/relationship, idea etc,
    write about one
  • Explain your ideas fully
  • Be sure to briefly explain what is happening in a
    quotation
  • Make sure you are clear in answering the first
    part of the question
  • Revise SXY paragraph structure and use it
    consistently
  • Use a formal style when writing essays
  • Be careful to be accurate when giving an example
    of an incident from the story
  • Use quotations as evidence
  • Develop the you analyse part of sxy paragraphs
    more by using connectives such as moreover to
    expand your comments

67
Victor Frankenstein
  •  
  • Victor Frankenstein's life story is at the heart
    of Frankenstein. A young Swiss boy, he grows up
    in Geneva reading the works of the ancient and
    outdated alchemists, a background that serves him
    ill when he attends university at Ingolstadt.
    There he learns about modern science and, within
    a few years, masters all that his professors have
    to teach him. He becomes fascinated with the
    secret of life, discovers it, and brings a
    hideous monster to life. The monster proceeds to
    kill Victor's youngest brother, best friend, and
    wife he also indirectly causes the deaths of two
    other innocents, including Victor's father.
    Though torn by remorse, shame, and guilt, Victor
    refuses to admit to anyone the horror of what he
    has created, even as he sees the ramifications of
    his creative act spiraling out of control.
  •  
  • Victor changes over the course of the novel from
    an innocent youth fascinated by the prospects of
    science into a disillusioned, guilt-ridden man
    determined to destroy the fruits of his arrogant
    scientific endeavor. Whether as a result of his
    desire to attain the godlike power of creating
    new life or his avoidance of the public arenas in
    which science is usually conducted, Victor is
    doomed by a lack of humanness. He cuts himself
    off from the world and eventually commits himself
    entirely to an animalistic obsession with
    revenging himself upon the monster.
  •  
  • At the end of the novel, having chased his
    creation ever northward, Victor relates his story
    to Robert Walton and then dies. With its multiple
    narrators and, hence, multiple perspectives, the
    novel leaves the reader with contrasting
    interpretations of Victor classic mad scientist,
    transgressing all boundaries without concern, or
    brave adventurer into unknown scientific lands,
    not to be held responsible for the consequences
    of his explorations.

68
The Monster
  •  The monster is Victor Frankenstein's creation,
    assembled from old body parts and strange
    chemicals, animated by a mysterious spark. He
    enters life eight feet tall and enormously strong
    but with the mind of a newborn. Abandoned by his
    creator and confused, he tries to integrate
    himself into society, only to be shunned
    universally. Looking in the mirror, he realizes
    his physical grotesqueness, an aspect of his
    persona that blinds society to his initially
    gentle, kind nature. Seeking revenge on his
    creator, he kills Victor's younger brother. After
    Victor destroys his work on the female monster
    meant to ease the monster's solitude, the monster
    murders Victor's best friend and then his new
    wife.
  • While Victor feels unmitigated hatred for his
    creation, the monster shows that he is not a
    purely evil being. The monster's eloquent
    narration of events (as provided by Victor)
    reveals his remarkable sensitivity and
    benevolence. He assists a group of poor peasants
    and saves a girl from drowning, but because of
    his outward appearance, he is rewarded only with
    beatings and disgust. Torn between vengefulness
    and compassion, the monster ends up lonely and
    tormented by remorse. Even the death of his
    creator-turned-would-be-destroyer offers only
    bittersweet relief joy because Victor has caused
    him so much suffering, sadness because Victor is
    the only person with whom he has had any sort of
    relationship.
About PowerShow.com