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Advocacy

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Advocacy On The Local Level Jo Ellen Carson Zonta Club of Fort Smith, Arkansas Zonta Inter-District Meeting 2011 * * What is the difference between lobbying and advocacy? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Advocacy


1
  • Advocacy
  • On The Local Level
  • Jo Ellen Carson
  • Zonta Club of Fort Smith, Arkansas
  • Zonta Inter-District Meeting
  • 2011

2
Benefits That Inspire!
  • Advocacy efforts in your organization can attract
    members, thus increasing membership in numbers
    and commitment.
  • Members who are affiliated with your club because
    they believe in its aims, goals and efforts, will
    strengthen your club.
  • Survey, Advocacy at the Local Club Level and
    Its Impact on Membership, June 2011, Cinnamon
    Girl Productions Summer Intern Research Team.

3
A WORKING DEFINITION OF ADVOCACY
  • Advocacy is an action directed at change.
  • It is putting a problem on the agenda,
    providing a solution to that problem, building
    support for that solution and for the action
    necessary to implement that solution.

4
  • WHAT IS SOCIAL JUSTICE ADVOCACY?
  • Social justice advocacy is public advocacy, which
    draws attention to an injustice and promotes the
    public good. It focuses attention on improving
    the well-being of the poor and marginalised
    members of the community. For example, social
    justice public advocacy efforts take up issues
    relating to women, children, workers, the
    disabled, etc. For Zonta International, the
    focus must be on women and the girl child.

5
So
  • In summary, Advocacy begins with a problem or
    with a perception that there is a better
    alternative to a current condition and seeks to
    solve that problem and/or implement the selected
    alternative.

6
9 Essential Advocacy Skills
  • Card 1 Analysing and influencing legislation or
    policies
  • Card 2 Preparing a briefing note or position
    paper
  • Card 3 Working from inside the system
  • Card 4 Lobbying or face-to-face meetings
  • Card 5 Writing and delivering a presentation
  • Card 6 Persuading through drama
  • Card 7 Writing and using a press release
  • Card 8 Carrying out a media interview
  • Card 9 Preparing a press conference

7
Analysing Policy or Legislation
  • Who benefits from this legislation or policy (if
    anyone)
  • Who loses (if anyone)
  • What will be the consequences five years from now
    of enforcing this?
  • How does the legislation or policy affect
    marginalised groups?
  • Is this something ordinary people can understand?
  • Who supports this law/policy, and why?
  • How did this issue first come to the notice of
    decision-makers?
  • What is the financial cost?
  • Can it be enforced? If so, by whom, and how?
  • What is the penalty if you dont obey this
    law/policy?
  • Does the law/policy violate the UN Declaration of
    Human Rights or any other convention signed by
    your country?
  • Is the law/policy consistent with your own
    countrys Bill of Rights and/or Constitution?

8
What will you analyse?
  • Legislate and policies might include
  • Draft or proposed policies
  • New policies
  • Long-established policies.
  • Of course, not all policies and legislation are
    written for example, there are traditional laws
    and customs, or decisions made and communicated
    without being written down. their design and
    implementation is influenced by powerful
    individuals or groups, then like written policies
    and legislation, they can be challenged through
    advocacy. These kind of policies and practices
    also require analysis. However, it is harder to
    analyse unwritten policies or legislation because
    there may be disagreement about what the policy
    is.

9
Try toTry not to?
  • Consult or involve people affected by the policy
    or legislation.
  • Be positive about the good parts of the policy or
    legislation.
  • Ask for a meeting with decision-makers to present
    and explain your analysis.
  • Only respond to policies and legislation when you
    have something concrete to say this will help
    maintain or gain credibility for your
    organisation.
  • Use the decision/policy-makers language when
    putting your points of view across, and support
    your statements with facts and evidence where
    appropriate.
  • Offer solutions when analysing the policy or
    legislation.
  • Develop contacts or allies who can show you draft
    policies and legislation.
  • Analyse a policy or legislation if you dont
    understand the issue.
  • Suggest that the decision/policy-makers may have
    any improper motives.
  • Criticise policies or legislation for
    individuals personal reasons.

10
Position Papers and Briefing Notes
  • Ideally a position paper should include
  • Statement of main recommendation one to two
    sentences.
  • Background explanation of why the position paper
    has been written. international treaties,
    decrees, policies, etc., which support the
    recommendation.
  • Evidence supporting the recommendation
    quantitative evidence, like facts and figures and
    qualitative evidence, like case studies, personal
    testimonies, anecdotes or examples supporting the
    recommendation. Ask for permission from
    individuals quoted, to protect confidentiality.
  • Our position logical explanation of how the
    evidence leads to the recommendations.
  • Answers to possible questions or objections.
  • Recommendations specific, realistic actions that
    the decision-maker can take.

11
  • Organisations and individuals supporting this
    position paper.
  • The name of your organisation or coalition, and
    logo if appropriate.
  • The date.
  • A contact name, address, telephone and fax
    number, and e-mail address, where available.
  • The mission/goals of your organisation or
    coalition.

12
Briefing Note
  • Briefing note
  • This document will only be seen by individuals
    within your organisation, or within your advocacy
    alliance, to assist them in delivering advocacy
    messages. Therefore it is acceptable to write
    notes instead of full sentences, and to use
    bullet points. Follow the same format as above,
    but also
  • Emphasise the most important points for
    example, using bold type/underline or a coloured
    pen.
  • Suggest possible strategies, tactics, minimum
    demands that cannot be compromised.
  • Include possible questions that might be asked,
    and suggested answers.
  • Include problematic issues that might arise, and
    suggest how to deal with them.

13
Position Paper Characteristics
  • A position paper is written to be read by a
    target, not an ally. It is a formal written
    record of the position (opinion) of an
    organisation or coalition, for an external
    audience. Position papers can
  • Be left with an individual decision-maker at the
    end of a face-to-face meeting, summarise the main
    points of your message
  • Be sent to local and national governments during
    consultation exercises
  • Be sent to people in influence, in response to a
    policy or action, to explain an alternative or
    supporting position
  • Summarise the resolutions of a conference or
    workshop
  • Show that a coalition of many different allies
    supports your advocacy objective
  • Be given to delegates or members of a committee
    at the beginning of a meeting or conference
    whether or not you are allowed to speak at the
    meeting.

14
Briefing Note Characteristics
  • A briefing note is written for an ally, not a
    target. It is similar to a speakers notes, to
    help someone who is speaking publicly in support
    of your advocacy objective. Often a briefing note
    is a position paper with additional advice to the
    speaker for example, how to answer questions, or
    key points to emphasise.

15
Try toTry not to?
  • Use appropriate language for your target
    audiences.
  • Tailor your position paper/briefing note to a
    particular audience for a particular reason.
  • Give full references of any
  • research or information quoted.
  • Be brief and to the point.
  • Ask others for ideas before writing.
  • Make sure the appropriate people have been
    consulted.
  • Ensure that everyone in the organisation
    understands the position the organisation is
    taking.
  • Read it carefully for mistakes before sending or
    using it.
  • Distribute a position paper that contradicts what
    you have said.
  • Include the words advocating or advocacy

16
More try totry not to?
  • Include irrelevant information.
  • Waffle make clear points and highlight them
    with bullet points.
  • Quote people without their permission or break
    confidentiality in case studies.
  • Use abbreviations unless necessary.

17
Face-to-Face Meetings
  • Establish points of entry
  • Think creatively about how you can get a meeting
    something you have in common? For example, if a
    friend decision-maker, ask your friend to
    introduce you to them so that you can negotiate
    meet, or alternatively use the opportunity as a
    face-to-face meeting
  • Ask for a meeting
  • Send a letter explaining what your advocacy goal
    is and up with a phone call. Often you will not
    get a meeting with target but with one of their
    staff (an indirect target). Always meet with
    the staff, and treat them in the same way you
    would treat the decision-maker.
  • Invite them to see the issue or problem
    themselves

18
Face-to-Face Meetings
  • Invite them out of their office to see the issue
    or problem first-hand and to show them why you
    need their support. If the decision-maker cannot
    leave their office, try taking your issue to them
    bring people directly affected by the issue to
    your meeting, show a short video addressing the
    issue or take a few photographs with you. If you
    have a friend who knows the decision-maker on
    their staff, ask your friend to send the letter
    or make the phone call to support your view.

19
F2F Meetings One of them
  • Find out where and how decisions.
  • Make a list of all the decision-making bodies to
    your advocacy issue (this could be similar local
    government bodies, NGO sector, business,
    professional associations, religious
    organisations dont rule anything out.
  • Find out how to join each decision-making body
    are members selected, elected or coopted, or how
    many shares in a company do they need to buy?
  • Nominate or suggest your representatives for
    relevant bodies.
  • Make the most of opportunities.
  • List all decision-making bodies on which your
    organisation or coalition has a member. Ensure
    that these positions are being fully used for
    your advocacy objective.

20
ZONTA INTERNATIONALADVOCACY POLICY
  • As adopted by the Zonta International Board, at
    its February 2000 meeting as last amended by the
    Zonta International Board, January 2009. (Refer
    to the Zonta International Website LAA Page).

21
ADVOCACY DEFINITION - CURRENT Advocacy is the
expression of support for or opposition to a
cause, argument or proposal. Advocacy may
include influencing laws, legislation or
attitudes. Zonta International, its districts,
and its clubs are urged to express themselves
about and become involved in issues
which Improve the legal, political, economic,
educational, health and professional status
of women Advance understanding, goodwill, and
peace through a world fellowship of executives in
business and the professions and Promote
justice and universal respect for human rights
and fundamental freedoms.
22
  • ADVOCACY GOALS
  • Zonta International, its districts, and its
    clubs, shall be nonpartisan and nonsectarian.
  • 2. Zonta International, its districts, and its
    clubs are encouraged to support legislation
    submitted to a legislative body for its
    consideration, which advances the implementation
    of the Objects of Zonta, the mandates of Zonta
    International Resolutions (current), the Beijing
    Declaration from the United Nations Fourth World
    Conference on Women and its updates and the
    Millennium Development Goals and their updates.

23
  1. Zonta International, its districts, and its clubs
    will ascertain if there are other like-minded
    organizations or individuals researching issues
    regarding the legal, political, economic,
    educational, health and professional status of
    women, and co-operate with these other
    organizations and individuals when appropriate.
    (Refer to Revised Policy on Affiliation of Zonta
    with Other Organizations ZI Website, LAA Page).

24
  • Whenever it is more effective to do so, Zonta
    International, its districts, and its clubs will
    work in co-operation with other organizations to
    educate people (including ourselves) about the
    legal, political, economic, educational, health
    and professional issues which affect the lives of
    women and the actions we must initiate to effect
    a positive change.
  • 5. When Zonta International, its districts, and
    its clubs host or sponsor educative activities,
    every effort should be made for a well-balanced
    presentation of the facts and viewpoints.

25
  • Zonta International, its districts, and its clubs
    may register protests concerning violations of
    human rights with the Zonta International United
    Nations Committee.
  • Clubs shall not otherwise express positions on
    issues involving a country other than their own
    except with the prior approval of the
    International President through the International
    United Nations Chairman.
  • Districts shall not otherwise express positions
    on issues involving countries other than their
    own except with the prior approval of the
    International President through the International
    United Nations Chairman.
  • c. Individual Zonta members shall not otherwise
    express positions on issues involving a country
    other than their own except with prior approval
    of the International President through the
    International United Nations Chairman.

26
  1. Zonta International, its districts, and its clubs
    shall not advocate on behalf of, or endorse, a
    political candidate or party, or any religious
    denomination.
  2. Zonta International, its districts, and its clubs
    may endorse qualified individuals for nonpartisan
    positions.

27
  1. Zonta clubs may express their opinion on issues
    only as clubs. Zonta districts may express their
    opinions only as districts. The Convention may
    express opinions on issues on behalf of Zonta
    International. Between conventions, only the
    Zonta International Board may express opinions
    on issues on behalf of Zonta International.
    Subject to Article 6c individual Zonta members
    may express a position on issues involving a
    country other than their own providing they use
    the exact wording of the position as contained in
    material adopted by the Zonta International Board
    or the International Presidents approval given
    through the International United Nations
    Chairman.

28
  • Individual members may express their personal
    views on issues which have not been given prior
    approval by the International President, through
    the International UN Chairman, only as private
    citizens, but must not attribute them to a Zonta
    club or District or to Zonta International.
  • 10. Districts may include guidelines for the
    process for determining their advocacy activity
    in their district rules of procedure providing
    that such guidelines conform to the
    International Guidelines.

29
ZONTA INTERNATIONALADVOCACY PROTOCOL
ZONTA ENTITY CAN SIGN
International President International Board District Governor Club President Individual Zontians On behalf of ZONTA INTERNATIONAL On behalf of DISTRICT (eg. Zonta International District 2) only IF a resolution has been passed on the subject at District Conference OR IF accepted by a majority of clubs voting by a mail ballot. (See Bylaw Article XIII, Section 10f) On behalf of CLUB (eg. Zonta Club of Bay View) only IF a majority decision is passed at a club meeting. In OWN NAME only, WITHOUT mention of Zonta
30
  • Please Note
  • no-one other than the International
    President/International Board can sign on behalf
    of Zonta International
  • Club Presidents can only sign on behalf of club
    if a motion is passed by a majority of members at
    a club meeting. (Club Boards of Directors cannot
    make policy/pass motions or take action binding a
    club).
  • On advocacy matters to be decided by the club,
    advance notice of discussion should be given
    (agenda items) and any papers distributed to all
    members before any vote is taken.
  • Governors, clubs, individuals should only
    advocate on matters pertaining to their own
    jurisdictions. Concerns re matters in other
    countries should be referred to the Chairman of
    the United Nations Committee. ( Refer to the
    Advocacy Policy, Section 9 for further
    information).

31
  • Zonta must remain nonpartisan and nonsectarian in
    advocacy action and on issues.
  • Zonta Districts,Clubs and members should not sign
    petitions in Zontas name.
  • Send a copy of your letter/action to your
    District LAA Chairman and to the International
    Chairman of the Legislative Awareness and
    Advocacy Committee
  • Contacts ( See International Directory)
  • Chairman, LAA Committee Denise Conroy
  • (email
    d.conroy_at_qut.edu.au)
  • Chairman, UN Committee Jackie Shapiro
  • (email jacci007_at_aol.com )

32
LINKING ADVOCACY WITH SERVICE and
AWARDS AWARDS/COMMITTEES PROGRAMS
33
What is Lobbying?
Lobbying is an organised attempt by an
individual, an organisation or groups of
individuals and/or organisations to influence on
behalf of a particular interest all the
stakeholders involved in preparing and passing
legislation. Such stakeholders include
ministerial advisers and staff, legislative
drafters, policy makers, members of Parliament,
portfolio committee members, select committees,
the staff of various committees, experts and
consultants serving those committees, etc. It
also means seeking the support of an influential
person or persons and providing accurate
information which legislators can use in their
decision-making. Lobbying is a give-and-take
process that also involves gathering new
information and analysis, which enables lobbyists
to strengthen their own strategies.
34
What is the difference between lobbying and
advocacy?
Lobbying is only one part of advocacy one tool
amongst many. The difference between advocacy
and lobbying can be explained as follows
ADVOCACY LOBBYING
Related to specific cause / issue Related to specific legislation
Group / collective effort May be individual or collective
Aimed at several stakeholders, both inside and outside of government Aimed specifically at legislators and government officials
Aimed at common good Aimed at specific (or partisan) interest
35
ZONTA DOES NOT LOBBY
We must not use the L word lobby. Zonta MUST
be non-partisan and non-sectarian (Bylaw Article
III, Section I) We must remain independent of all
political parties and lobby groups in order to
maintain our non-partisan stance AND to avoid
being used by other organisations to further
their own ends. Lobbying tactics usually
involve giving support either money, votes,
endorsement or suggesting that support will be
directed elsewhere. It is a political tactic
and NOT one endorsed by Zonta International. We
must use the word advocate in all correspondence
and presentations.
36
FOUNDATION STATUS 501c(3)
The Zonta International Foundation (and some
Zonta Clubs) in the USA has tax deductible
status. There is some provision in the law for
advocacy to influence legislation Section
501(h) which promotes balance in the presentation
of conflicting views and eases the burden of
administration of Section 501c(3).
37
Any charitable body can (lobby) advocate
legally, using one of 2 standards by which their
compliance with the IRS Code is
measured. (i) insubstantial part test
(1934) (ii) Section 501 (h) expenditure test
(1976) (called the 20 rule)
38
In the USA direct lobbying is defined as
communication with either a legislator, an
employee of a legislative body or any other
government employee who may participate in the
formulation of the legislation. There is usually
a reference to a specific piece of legislation,
and a view on it is taken/expressed. This action
is NOT to be undertaken in Zontas name unless
agreed to by the LAA/UN Chairman.
39
  • EXCEPTIONS TO DIRECT LOBBYING ARE
  • Non-partisan analysis, study or research that
    presents all sides of an issue.
  • Responses to written requests for assistance from
    committees or other legislative bodies.
  • Challenges to, or support for, legislative
    proposals that would change the organizations
    rights or its right to exist.
  • Examination and discussion of broad social,
    economic and similar problems.

40
All Zonta Clubs in the US are regarded as tax
exempt (Section 501c(4)), and any Zonta Clubs
with tax deductible status (Section 501c(3)),
should seek professional advice from tax advisors
BEFORE undertaking any activity which meets the
IRS/Treasury definition of direct lobbying as
this can affect your status in these categories.
41
ZONTA INTERNATIONAL POSITION ON LETTER-WRITING BY
ZONTIANS, ZONTA CLUBS, DISTRICTS
  • That any advocacy which involves co-ordinated
    letter-writing by members/clubs be checked with
    the LAA Chairman/UN Chairman before proceeding.
  • Advocacy on major Conventions will be
    co-ordinated through the LAA Chairman/UN Chairman
    and draft letters/templates will be provided for
    use by members/clubs/districts.
  • Above all, advocacy can only take place on
    matters covered by Zontas Objects (a) and (c) -
    improving the legal, political, economic,
    educational, health status of women and promoting
    justice and universal respect for human rights
    and fundamental freedoms.

42
  • LEGISLATIVE AWARENESS means that we know the
    process by which laws are created at the local,
    state and federal (national) level of government,
    from the first mention/thought on the issue
    through to the passage or defeat of a law.
  • LEGISLATIVE AWARENESS also means that we know
    how to have laws repealed or changed, how to
    prepare submissions for parliamentary inquiries
    or reviews, and how to present a logical,
    comprehensive case to support our views/arguments
    for or against it.
  • This awareness or discipline is referred to as
    the public policy process. It is the starting
    point for advocacy.

43
To continue
  • LEGISLATIVE AWARENESS also means educating
    yourself about the Division of Powers in your
    country that is, what each level of government
    is responsible for.
  • You also need to know whether each level of
    government has co-equal powers, or whether one
    level is superior to (ie. can over-rule)
    another level.

44
Some basics
  • IT IS ALSO HELPFUL TO KNOW ABOUT
  • The Constitution
  • Federal (National) and State legislature
    processes
  • Local Government processes
  • How laws are made
  • The agencies/departments which implement and
    enforce laws
  • How and when you can participate in the
    legislative process

45
HOW CAN WE INFORM OURSELVES ON LEGISLATIVE
MATTERS?
  • Check your parliaments website
  • Run a seminar session with invited
    (knowledgeable) speakers
  • Ask someone in your State who lectures in
    politics or public policy or who has a Masters
    Degree in these fields
  • Ask a senior politician how laws are made/to
    explain the legislative process
  • Better still, recruit people in these occupations
    as members.
  • ( See www.mkogy.hu/world.parliaments.htm)

46
  • ADVOCACY CHECKLIST
  • Choose an issue that promotes the status of women
  • - education
  • - health
  • - legal
  • - social
  • - economic
  • - human rights
  • Use the SCORE CARD and the Advocacy Framework
    which links Zontas Objects to CEDAW Articles
    (See ZI Website LAA page)

47
ZONTA INTERNATIONAL LAA COMMITTEE 2008 - 2010
  • ADVOCACY SCORECARD IS IT A
    STATUS OF WOMEN ISSUE?
  • SERVICE PROJECT
  • ( strike out one not applicable if both Service
    Advocacy leave)

TOPICS/PROJECTS ZONTAS OBJECTS RE STATUS OF WOMEN (STATE ADVOCACY TOPIC/ SERVICE PROJECT HERE) DOES IT MEET OBJECTS? YES ? NO X
Bylaw Article II (a) Improving the Status of Women LEGAL STATUS (Incl. PROFESSIONAL STATUS)
POLITICAL STATUS
ECONOMIC STATUS
EDUCATIONAL STATUS
HEALTH STATUS
Bylaw Article II (c) Justice and Universal Respect for Human Rights ( Women and the Girl Child)
Notes One or more items must be ticked against
Z.I. Objects for the Advocacy/Service project to
proceed. Refer to Z.I. Advocacy Framework for
detailed explanation of what is covered under
each status category.
48
Ensure that the Club/District is in agreement
about the issue as one suitable for ZONTA
ADVOCACY ie. AVOID -partisan/sectarian
issues -issues which may divide the membership
(eg. abortion, euthanasia, legalised
prostitution, genetic research, etc.) Issues
where there is no majority (95) agreement
should be pursued as INDIVIDUAL advocacy (i.e. in
ones own name NOT in Zontas name).
49
NON PARTISAN / NON SECTARIAN
Definitions of these terms are given in the IBL
(now Governing Documents) Booklet. Item 8 of the
Advocacy Policy requires that we nominate persons
ONLY FOR NON PARTISAN positions (ie.
NON-POLITICAL positions not influenced by,
affiliated with, or supporting the interest or
policies of any persons or party) The same would
apply to SECTARIAN organisations (affiliation
with any particular religion or sect). Zonta
must, at all times, be seen to be totally
impartial with respect to religious, sectarian or
political organisations, and to not favour any
one particular belief over another with respect
to ideology or dogma. These are matters for
PERSONAL CHOICE.
50
  • PLAN YOUR ADVOCACY ACTIVITY
  • - Know your issue (high level of expertise
    required)
  • Establish your objectives
  • Conduct a stakeholder analysis to identify
    opposition
  • Develop a strategy
  • Identify and mobilise required resources
  • Monitor and evaluate the progress
  • Avoid conflicts of interest at all times
  • Conduct advocacy in an ethical manner
  • KNOW YOUR LEGISLATIVE SYSTEM AND PROCESSES

51
WHAT RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE TO YOU?
  • RESOURCES ON THE Z.I. WEBSITE LAA PAGE
  • ADVOCACY/SERVICE SCORECARD (does it meet our
    Objects?)
  • ADVOCACY FRAMEWORK (matching Zontas Objects
    with CEDAW Articles 1-16)
  • WHEN/WHO TO TAKE ACTION (at what level
    International, District, Club should the issue
    be dealt with?)
  • HOW SHOULD ADVOCACY PROCEED? (what
    policies/guidelines are applicable? Conduct
    thorough research check District and Club
    advocacy processes).

52
For example
  • APPLYING ZONTAS SCORECARD TO THE INTERNATIONAL
    SERVICE/ZISVAW 2008-2010 PROJECTS (plus Beijing
    10 Goals and the Millennium Development Goals
    (MDGs) and Millennium Summit 5)
  • This demonstrates our connectivity to key
    platforms
  • for women (including CEDAW) and enhances our
  • consultative status with the United Nations.

53
INSTRUMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW CONCERNING WOMEN
  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)
  • Convention of the Political Rights of Women
    (1952)
  • International Covenant on Civil and Political
    Rights (1966)
  • International Covenant on Economic, Social and
    Cultural Rights (1966)
  • Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of
    Discrimination against Women (1967)
  • Declaration on the Protection of Women and
    Children in Emergency and Armed Conflict (1974)
  • Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of
    Discrimination against Women (1979)
  • Declaration of the Elimination of Violence
    against Women (1993)
  • Inter-American Convention for the Prevention,
    Punishment and Elimination of Violence against
    Women (Belém do Pará Convention) (1995)
  • Universal Declaration on Democracy (1997)
  • Optional Protocol to the Convention on the
    Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination
    against Women (1999)

At its 162nd session (Windhoek, 11 April 1998),
the Inter-Parliamentary Council took a special
decision on the recommendation of women
parliamentarians entitled Parliamentary action
for national follow-up to international
agreements and treaties regarding women.
Access this information at www.ipu.org/wmn-e/law.h
tm
54
RELATED DOCUMENTS
BEIJING DECLARATION AND PLATFORM FOR
ACTION www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/beijing/platform/
plat1.htm www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/beijing/index.
htm BEIJING 5 (2000) AND 10 (2005) CRITICAL
AREAS OF CONCERN www.un.org/womenwatch/forum/index
.html (Report
E/CN.6/2000/PC/CRP.1) www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/cs
w/csw49/documents.html (Report
E/CN.6/2005/2) MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS
(2000) www.un.org/womenwatch/millenniumgoals/relat
edsites.html MILLENNIUM 5 SUMMIT
(2005) www.un.org/summit2005/
55
OTHER SOURCES
  • LAA Resources CEDAW and the Optional Protocol to
    CEDAW See LAA page on ZI website. See also
    Zonta Countries, CEDAW Signatures, Reports for
    latest country reports submitted.
  • UN High Commissioner for Human Rights treaties,
    declarations, documents www.unhchr.ch/map.htm
  • World Health Organisations topics on womens
    health (FGM, HIV-Aids, Violence etc)
    www.who.int/topics
  • World Bank Database of Gender Statistics
    http//genderstats.worldbank.org/menu.asp
  • Council of Europe www.coe.int (equality between
    men and women, trafficking, violence against
    women)
  • UN Economic Commission for Europe Gender
    Statistics website www.unece.org/stats/gender
  • The European Convention on Human Rights
  • http//conventions.coe.int/Treaty

56
ASSISTANCE WITH ADVOCACY
Contact your District LAA Co-ordinator or the
Zonta International LAA Committee. Chairman
Denise Conroy d.conroy_at_qut.edu.au
Connie Deckert
cedeckert_at_bellnet.ca Kikuko
(Kitty) Hara kikuhara_at_tky.3web.ne.jp
A.O. Omotayo (Tayo) Morgan

victoriabolajoko_at_yahoo.co.uk
Bev Morrow dougnbev_at_bresnan.net
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