EMPLOYEE OHSW INDUCTION TRAINING MODULE - 2007 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: EMPLOYEE OHSW INDUCTION TRAINING MODULE - 2007


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EMPLOYEE OHSW INDUCTIONTRAINING MODULE - 2007
  • Developed By Human Resources Officer
  • Warren Couzens Renmark Paringa Council 2007.
  • (Resource Safer Industries SA Building Civil
    Site Safety Induction Booklet Endorsed by
    Workcover Corporation 2006 LGA Employee
    Handbook 2006

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Introduction
  • OHSW Induction training varies widely from
    organisation to organisation, but by its very
    nature an induction course covers specific
    information relevant to the organisation.
  • OHSW Induction training is a process rather than
    a once off course, informal information and
    instruction provided form a very important
    element

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  • The Objectives
  • During the process employees will
  • Understand that Council is committed to health
    and safety
  • recognize that everyone in Council has a role to
    ensure a safe work environment
  • Be aware of fire and emergency procedures
  • Identify personnel with key health and safety
    responsibilities within Council.
  • be aware of Councils OHSWPolicies / Procedures

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Contents
  • Duty Of Care
  • Hazard Management
  • (a) Personal Protective Equipment
  • 3) (b) Safe Use of Plant Equipment
  • Safety Signs
  • Clean, Safe Tidy Work Sites
  • Licenses, Tickets, Permits Registrations
  • Accident Incident Reporting
  • Site Emergency Evacuation

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Section 1 Duty Of Care
  • Duty of care is the legal responsibility of every
    one including
  • Employers
  • Employees and health safety representatives
  • Self Employed
  • Designers
  • Occupiers of buildings
  • Owners of buildings
  • Owners of plant
  • Other people
  • Manufacturers Suppliers of machinery

As stated in the OHSW Act 1986 OHSW Regulations
1995 SA Approved Codes of Practice (including
numerous Australian Standards) OHSW Guidelines.
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1.1 Employers Duties (refer to section 19 of the
Act)Every employer has duty to each employee to
ensure that as far as reasonably practicable, the
employee is, while at work, safe from injury and
risk to health.1.2 Employees Duties
(refer to section 21 of the Act )The employees
must take reasonable care to protect their own
health and safety and the health and safety of
others who may be affected by their actions at
work.
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1.3 Duties of Various OthersThe OHSW Act,
sections 19 25 places duties on various people
who may affect health and safety at the
workplace including employers. The self
employed, owners, occupiers, employees,
designers, manufacturers, suppliers, importers,
erectors and installers
  • 1.4 ConsultationThe OHSW Act, as outlined in
    sections 33 34, requires the employer to
    consult the Health Safety Representative
    Health Safety Committee where change to a
    workplace, work process, policy or procedure may
    affect the health, safety or welfare of an
    employee at work.

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1.5 The Act, Regulations, Codes StandardsAs
previously stated in this section, the OHSW Act
(1986) provides the foundation to health and
safety in the South Australian workplace.The
Act is supported by the OHSW Regulations 1995,
various approved Codes of Practice Australian
Standards
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OHSW Act - 1986
  • Describes how to provide health safety in South
    Australian workplaces and is Law.

OHSW Regulations -1995
  • Are made under the Act and sets out general
    principles, providing the practical steps which
    should be followed in order to prevent injuries
    and illness at work.

Codes of Practice
  • Give you practical guidance on how to comply with
    the legal requirements of specific regulations
    and should be used in addition to the Act
    Regulations.

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Australian / NZ Standards
  • Have been developed to provide minimal levels of
    performance or quality for a specific hazard,
    work process or product . If an AS/NZ Standard is
    listed in the Act and or regulation it becomes a
    part of it and must be followed.

Guidelines1. Developed by Workcover Corporation
Safework SA2. Developed by the specific
Industries it relates too
  • Guidelines for safe work are developed by
    tripartite committee to assist with regulatory
    requirements. Workcover Corporation and SafeWork
    SA guidelines are generic while industry
    guidelines are industry specific

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Council OHSW Policies.
  • A policy is defined as a specific statement of
    principles or guiding actions that imply clear
    commitment by council a statement of values or
    intent that provides a basis for consistent
    decision making and resource allocation a guide
    to determine the present and future.

Council SWPs SOPs or WMS
  • Council recognizes that written safe work
    procedures are essential to ensure a safe work
    environment which also provide all employees
    information to perform tasks safely by a step
    by step description of the safest and most
    effective way to carry out a particular job.
  • Can also be known as Task Instruction, Work
    Instruction, Safe Operating Procedures or Work
    Method Statement.

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Section 2 Hazard Management
  • A hazard is anything which has the potential to
    cause harm or loss.
  • The harm or loss may take the form of
  • An injury or disease (provide example)
  • Property damage (provide example )
  • Environmental harm. (provide example )

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Section 2 Hazard Management cont,
BRIEF. Prior to commencement of any phase of the
work process the employer and/or occupier shall
ensure that an investigation of the site is
conducted by a person competent in all aspects of
the work work plan method statement, prepared
and documented. This work plan should include
identification and assessment of any hazard and
control measures to be implemented All
potential hazards should be identified and
assessed in consultation with employees and/or
their representatives.
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2.1 Identification. How do I identify a hazard ?
  • A Hazard may be
  • An object (i.e. dangerous goods ) or
  • A situation (i.e. inexperienced personnel )

This includes, but is not limited to Open
excavation Inhalation of dust, fibres, vapours
gases Noise vibration Extremes of temperature
humidity Bad housekeeping Poor access /
egress Poor lighting / visibility Live power
wiring Trips falls Working at
heights Dangerous goods Manual mechanical
handling Confined spaces Fire, Hygiene, Drugs
Alcohol
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2.1 Identification. How do I identify a hazard ?
cont
  • To identify hazards to health safety
  • check records of all injuries / incidents that
    have occurred in the workplace
  • undertake regular inspections of the workplace
    using checklists
  • Consult with employees or their representatives,
    on any potential hazards
  • refer to the OHSW Act Regulations any
    approved codes

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2.2 Assessment of Risk
  • Once hazards have been identified, they should be
    assessed in terms of their potential to cause
    harm, both now and in the future
  • When making an assessment on the possible risk to
    health/safety, the following must be considered
  • The likelihood that they will cause harm
    (Probability )
  • The severity of the harm they could do
    (Consequence ) and
  • The number of times people are exposed to the
    hazard (Frequency )

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2.2 Assessment of Risk cont
The assessment of the risk is a process of
gathering information in order to make a clear
and educated decision on which controls, need to
be implemented to eliminate or minimize the risk
level using all reasonably practicable measures.
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2.2 Risk Control.
Once hazards are identified and assessed,
measures to eliminate or minimise them must be
determined in accordance with the hierarchy of
control
2.3 Hierarchy Of Control
  • Elimination
  • Substitution
  • Isolation
  • Engineering
  • Administrative
  • Personal Protective Equipment

Best
Worst
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2.4 Hierarchy Of Control cont
Control measures which make the workplace safe
are likely to be more effective than measures
which protect employees from hazardous
worksite. When adopting measures to control a
hazardous risk, the hierarchy must be followed
when selecting the approach to be taken.
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2.4 Hierarchy Of Control cont
Measures from the top of hierarchy give better
results and must be adopted wherever
possible. Measures from the bottom of the
hierarchy are more difficult to maintain and must
be regarded as interim measures until preferred
ones can be implemented.
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2.4.1 Elimination
Elimination completely removes the hazard and is
the ideal control solution. Examples of
elimination includes ceasing to use a hazardous
substance and changing a process to remove the
need for a hazardous action.
2.4.2 Substitution
Substitution is where a hazard is replaced by a
less hazardous alternative, for example,
instead of using a hazardous item of plant or
equipment, substitute it for a less hazardous
item that serves the same purpose
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2.4.3 Isolation
Isolation involves separating the hazard from
people by the use of physical barriers to
contain/enclose the hazard or by distance and/or
time. An example is using a fully automated
rather than a manual process.
2.4.4 Engineering Control
If elimination, substitution or isolation cannot
be used effectively the next preferred measure is
engineering control. This may include
modification of tools and equipment guarding and
local exhaust ventilation
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2.4.5 Administrative Control
  • Where an unacceptable health safety risk still
    remains administrative controls must be used.
  • This involves the introduction of work practices
    which reduce risk by limiting the exposure to the
    worker from the hazard.
  • Measures may Include
  • Reducing the number of workers exposed period
    of exposure
  • Rotating work place activities
  • Special procedure to be followed for the use of
    chemicals, excavation procedures
  • Placing signs, effective training and
    Documentation.

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2.4.6 Personal Protective Equipment.
Personal Protective equipment must be used where
all other control measures have not been fully
effective. (your supervisor will issue you the
PPE) OHSW Regs 1995 2.12.1 Council OHSW
Policy 6.10
Application of Control Hierarchy
The employer must attempt to control the exposure
of the worker to hazards by first assessing
whether the most preferred control
measure/elimination is possible. If elimination
is not possible, the employer should assess
whether the next preferred control measure can be
achieved.
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2.5 Hazard Management Summary
  • Identify all hazards
  • Assess the levels of risk
  • Control the risk using control hierarchy
    principles
  • Consult with all members of the work team
  • Report all accidents/incidents no matter how
    small to your supervisor.
  • Regularly review the work process to ensure all
    members of the work team are complying and
    highlight any possible areas for improving hazard
    management systems.

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2.5 Hazard Management Summary cont.
Remember , you or others can cause a hazardous
situation by any act and/or omission. DO NOT HIDE
IT, REPORT IT ! Through consultation with others
on site the hazard can be controlled, do not
ignore it or you will be putting yourself and
others at risk.
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2.6 Hazard Substances or Situations 2.6.1
Asbestos.
  • Often found in the friable form do not attempt
    to remove any asbestos without prior knowledge or
    training in the procedures required.
  • OHSW Regs 1995 Section 4.2.1 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.23

2.6.2 Synthetic Mineral Fibers (SMFs)
SMF is a term used to describe fibres made from
glass, rock or other materials. SMFs are used
for installation purposes in the manufacture and
reinforcement of cement and plaster building
materials. OHSW Reg.s 1995 section 4.4.1
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2.6.3 Chemicals
Before handling any chemicals you must be aware
of the hazards involved with that particular
chemical through material safety data sheets
(MSDS) or, if in doubt, the chemical may have to
be isolated until appropriate safety measures are
put in place. OHSW Regs. 1995 sect. 4.1.1
4.1.3 Council OHSW Policy 6.11
2.6.4 Dust
Dust is common problem on construction sites,
processes such as excavation or demolition work
are major contributors to serious dust problems
Materials such as cement or gypsum bases also
create serious risk to health. OHSW Regs. 1995
section 2.4.3
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2.7 Excavations and Trenches
Any work around or in an excavated area or trench
is extremely dangerous, even the collapse of a
small trench has the potential to take life. No
person shall enter an excavation, pit or trench
exceeding 1.5 metre in depth unless appropriate
measures, such as benching, battering or shoring
are taken to prevent collapse. (OHSW Regs
1995. Sect. 5.5 .)
2.8 Compressed Air.
Compressed air is used to run pneumatic tools,
like nails guns, spray painting equipment and
jack Hammers. If precautions are not taken it can
be turned into a weapon a flailing hose can hit
like a hammer ! Do Not Use Compressed Air To Blow
Dust From Clothing This can cause Serious
Injury OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.4.4
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2.9 Confined Space
  • A confined space is a space of any volume which
  • Is not intended as a regular workplace
  • Has restricted means for entry and exit
  • May have inadequate ventilation and or
    atmosphere which is either contaminated or
    oxygen-deficient.
  • Where a confined space, as defined above, is to
    be entered, the requirements of AS/NZ 2865
    Safety Working in a Confined Space must be
    complied with and includes provisions for permits
    to work, rescue and first aid.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.1.4 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.17

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2.10 Electrical Equipment Mechanical Plant.
  • Where personnel are working on or near
  • Live electrical equipment
  • Exposed moving mechanical components, e.g,
    gears, drive shafts, pulleys
  • Areas where there could be a release of steam,
    chemicals, pressurized fluids or biological
    hazards
  • Action must be taken to isolate the system, on
    such a shutdown, a tag or lock out systems shall
    apply.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 5.7.1 Council OHSW Policy
    6.18 /6.21

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2.11 Housekeeping
  • Housekeeping is an important component of health
    and safety which must be approached in a
    systematic manner in order o maintain a clean
    safe and tidy workplace
  • The workplace must be regularly inspected with
    any hazards identified, assessed, eliminated or
    controlled.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.4.3 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.4

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2.12 Drugs and Alcohol
  • Employees, contractors, visitors or other persons
    at the worksite/place must not place themselves
    or others at risk because of consumption of
    alcohol or drugs.
  • You must not commence duties at work while in an
    unfit state due to alcohol or drugs, you must
    inform your Supervisor if you are own prescribed
    medication that may effect your ability to
    perform duties.
  • OHSW Act 1986 section 21 Council Policy 6.13

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2.13 Manual Handling
  • Manual handling is any work process that
    requires
  • Lifting Lowering Pushing Carrying Bending
  • Pulling Moving Holding Reaching Twisting
  • Each year 10.000 south Australians suffer
    injuries caused by incorrect manual handling
    techniques
  • When mechanical aids cannot be used, you must use
    correct manual handling practices
  • A risk assessment should be undertaken prior to
    the manual handling task
  • Do not try and lift heavy or awkward loads on
    your own seek assistance
  • REMEMBER, USE THE CORRECT RECOMMENDED MANUAL
    HANDLING TECHNIQUES IN THE WORKPLACE, AND AVOID
    BECOMING ANOTHER SOUTH AUSTRALIAN ON THE INJURY
    LIST.
  • OHSW Reg. 1995 section 2.9.1 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.5

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Section 3. (a) Personal Protective Equipment.
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is provided
    by your Employer for your safety, it is your
    responsibility to take good care of it and wear
    it as directed or required.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 sect. 2.12.1 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.10

3.1 Clothing PPE must be used to keep
contaminants from soiling clothes and /or being
transported outside the workplace. High
visibility garments and long sleeve shirts/pants
are appropriate methods for cover up exposure to
the suns harmful rays. Rings, bracelets and neck
chains must not be worn on work sites due to
risks associated with some work activities. OHSW
Regs. 1995 section 2.12.1 Council OHSW Policy
6.10
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3.2 Safety FootwearAppropriate footwear in
accordance with AS/NZ Standard 2210 must be worn
at all times whilst on site. If the site is wet
under foot, rubber boots with steel toe cap
should be worn.Any soft toe footwear is not
permitted to be worn on sites where the risk of
foot injury is evident.(OHSW Regs. 1995
section 2.12.1 - AS/NZ Standard 2210 )
  • 3.3 Head Protection
  • Ensure you carry a safety helmet with you at all
    times on building/construction sites and use
    whenever there is risk of any debris falling from
    above or any over head risk of head injury
  • Before entering any site check to see if the site
    policy requires person to wear hard hat
    protection part or full time. Safety helmets must
    comply with AS/NZ standard 1801.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.12.1 - AS/NZ
    Standard 1801)

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3.4 Eye Protection
  • Appropriate eye protection must be worn if there
    is any likely risk of an eye injury/damage, and
    any signage on site(s) indicate policy
    requirement.
  • Ensure that eye protection you are wearing is
    applicable for the task performed. (OHSW Reg.
    1995 2.12 - AS/NZ Standard 1336 )

3.5 Hearing Protection
In Industry today one of the most common safety
issues is noise. You must always ensure that you
have the correct hearing protection e.g. ear
plugs, muffs and must be worn when there is risk
of hearing damage. (OHSW Reg. 1995 2.12 -
AS/NZ Standard 1270 )
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3.6 Gloves
Gloves are used to protect your hand from
injury/damage from certain hazards, they must be
worn to prevent injury, but ensure they
themselves do not create a hazard as such by
getting caught on/in moving objects. (OHSW
Reg. 1995 2.12 - AS/NZ Standard 2161)
3.7 Respiratory Protection
Failing to wear suitable respiratory protection
is probably one of the biggest contributors to
occupational death of workers in
Australia. Respiratory protection must be
properly used in workplaces where atmosphere may
be contaminated with potentially hazardous dust,
fibres, mists or vapours. (OHSW Reg. 1995 2.12
- AS/NZ Standard 1715 1716 )
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3.8 High Visibility Garments
High Visibility vests/garments must always be
worn whenever there is a risk of being struck by
mobile plant, traffic or other moving objects (or
part of your employers policy) you must ensure
the correct type is worn to suit day/night work
conditions. (OHSW Reg. 1995 2.12 )
3.9 Heat Stress / Exhaustion
Important to recognize the effects of climatic
conditions e.g. heat stress/exhaustion can occur
when working in excessive heat particularly in
conjunction with high humidity and direct
exposure to the sun. You must refer to your
employers policy related to climatic conditions.
( Council Policy No. 6.8 )
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3.10 Fatigue
  • We are familiar with the pain associated with
    physical fatigue how it effects our ability to
    perform efficiently safely.
  • We need to give our bodies and minds adequate
    rest to recover from the stresses of work, family
    and personal lives and there keep and maintain a
    healthy lifestyle.
  • (LGA Healthy Lifestyle Programmes )

3.11 Balancing Work and Recreation Time.
Shift work, long hours often make it difficult to
balance work requirements, personal and family
responsibilities, how we prepare and recuperate
from work recreation will have a direct affect
on work performance and injury rates. (LGA
Healthy Lifestyle Programmes )
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Section 3 (b) - Safe use of Plant Equipment
  • 3.12 Hand Tools

Use only the correct tool for the job ! All hand
tools must be in good repair, spades, shovels,
axes etc heads must properly wedged on shaft
handles with no splits, the right tool for the
task must be selected and used. (SWP No. 800 )
3.13 Power Tools
When using equipment like power tools, you must
ensure that they are in good working condition
and fitted with appropriate safety guards,
electrical tools equipment must be tagged and
tested as per standards. Before after a job you
must inspect the tool and report any defects to
your supervisor who will arrange for repairs or
replacement. (SWP No. 801 )
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3.14 Safe Use of Ladders
  • Using a ladder safely includes
  • Work undertaken from a ladder should be
    performed whilst the worker is facing the
    ladder.
  • Always maintain 3 points of contact and no over
    reaching.
  • Only one person on the ladder at any one time.
  • Do not use metal ladders where electricity work
    exists, and keep out swing arc of doorways.
    (unless cordoned off )
  • ladders should be secured against movement and
    be supported from a firm, level, non slip
    surface at a ration of 41 and secured at top
    and bottom.
  • Inspected prior to and after use and before
    storage, report any defects. (SWP No. 107 706
    )

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3.15 Working at Heights
  • If there is any risk of injury due to a fall from
    a height, then appropriate protection must be
    provided.
  • Where work is carried out at heights other than
    off a ladder, consideration must be given to the
    following alternatives
  • Scaffolding Elevating Work Platforms
    Cranes
  • Scissor lifts Static Lines Edge
    Protection
  • Safe Use of Safety Harness and Lanyards.
  • DO NOT alter or reposition scaffold or use
    scaffold that appears incomplete, damaged,
    unsuitable or has a danger or Out of Service tag
    attached.
  • Division 2.13 OHSW Regs. 1995 Prevention of
    Falls,
  • with reference to AS/NZ Standards 1576
    Scaffolding parts 1-4.
  • AS/NZ 1657 Fixed Platforms, Walkways, Stairways
    and Ladders.
  • AS/NZ 1891 Industrial Safety Belts Harnesses
    and
  • AS/NZ 1892 Portable Ladders

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3.16 Scaffolding
  • Scaffolding is the most common used type of
    working platform used on site, all scaffolding
    over 4 metres in height must be erected by a
    holder of a certificates of competency for the
    erection of scaffolding. (SWP No. 710)

3.17 Electrical Leads and Wiring
Before using electrical extensions cords,
portable electrical tools must be checked prior
to any use. Each item must be tested /tagged with
the appropriate colour coded tag, all portable
electrical equipment must be used in conjunction
with a portable earth leakage circuit breaker
(ELCB) (Council Policy 6.18 )
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3.18 Traffic Control
  • Many projects are carried out on or near public
    roads and the risk of injury to workers, public
    and damage to plant/equipment is always present.
  • A high visibility garment must be worn at all
    times, day/night
  • Traffic control devices must be placed in
    accordance with Traffic Control Devices AS/NZ
    standard 1742.3.
  • Workers setting up a workzone must be trained in
    Workzone Traffic Management.
  • ( your employer will provide this training )
  • Report any incident, unauthorized relocation or
    incorrect use of traffic control devices to your
    direct supervisor.

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3.19 Working Near Services (Under or Above
Ground)
  • Before you start work at a site check to see that
    all services have been identified, marked or
    flagged off.
  • Look around your work area (do a walk through
    first) see if there is evidence of any services,
    you may notice poles, overhead wires, taps, gas,
    water mains and markers.
  • If you come across something that you are unsure
    of, stop work and seek advice from your
    supervisor
  • Stop work and report immediately any damage to
    your supervisor, where safe to do so isolate the
    area, and do not restart any work until directed.
  • Always use your employer pre-work site checklist
    to identify any services prior to commencing any
    work

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3.20 Working with Lasers.
  • The OHSW regulations 3.2.31 require that lasers
    are labelled in accordance the AS/NZ standard
    2211.
  • Lasers must remain in the control of an
    authorized, competent person and not be
    deliberately aimed at other persons.
  • The laser beam path, should be located below or
    well above the normal eye level of other
    employees and appropriate signage must be set up
    to warn others that lasers operations are in
    progress.
  • Workers required to operate laser equipment must
    be trained to a level that suits the class of the
    laser they use.
  • OHSW Regs.1995 section 3.2.31 AS/NZ Standard
    2211

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3.22 Explosive Powered Tools
3.21 Personnel Working Overhead
Place suitable signage and barriers to warn and
protect all people that may be effected by
overhead work, secure all tools and
materials. Provide overhead protection where
required such as when working in areas of
potential head injury. (OHSW Regs. 1995 -5.2.4
)
  • Only competent and trained persons shall operate
    explosive powered tools to minimise the risk of
    injury such as
  • Noise
  • Possible free flight of the fastener
    penetrating material
  • Materials shattering and spraying materials
  • Ricochet materials

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3.22 Demolition
  • Demolition work entails an extensive range of
    hazards which requires strategies that consider
    the following but are not limited to-
  • structural stability during demolition and
    temporary propping /stabilization including
    adjacent structures.
  • Fire prevention and protection
  • safe access / egress for workers.
  • Methods of controlling dust and noise emissions
  • safe removal of debris
  • Public protection requirements
  • statutory authority requirements.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 5.2.1

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3.24 Live Cables, Energised Plant and Other
Services.
  • A thorough site investigation must locate all
    live cables, plant and services before work
    commences, whether they be underground or
    overhead
  • Special attention for hazards such as-
  • Overhead powerlines , bus bars to equipment such
    as bridge and gantry cranes
  • Overhead services
  • Underground or otherwise hidden cables
    services
  • Cabling in wall chases and cavities
  • Cracked or faulty insulation on equipment
  • Equipment that is overhanging
  • These must be clearly marked and all employees
    made aware.

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3.25 Stressed Concrete and Tilt Up Construction
  • Possible hazards that require special attention
    include-
  • Design and construction faults
  • Stressing forces
  • Cables and tendons
  • Poor training and limited experience
  • Working at height
  • Falling objects
  • Plant
  • Weather

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3.26 Noise
  • Personal hearing protection (ear muffs or plugs
    or both ) must be worn when noise emissions can
    cause a risk to hearing loss or damage and / or
    is above 90 decibels (A)
  • (as per the exposure standard )
  • Always consider other people (whether on site or
    not ). If they are affected by your noisy work
    operations you may need to reschedule the work or
    warn others.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.10.1

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3.27 Personal Hygiene and Safety
  • Personal cleanliness is important to prevent work
    related illness and the spread of infection.
  • Washing you hands before eating, drinking or
    smoking will reduce the risk of hazardous
    substances entering your body through skin
    absorption or ingestion.
  • Long hair must be confined so ti will not become
    entangled in plant equipment or machinery or
    similar reason for loose clothing and jewellery.
  • Division 2 OHSW Regs. 1995.

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3.28 Operating Plant
  • Do not drive or operate any plant unless you are
    trained, authorised to do so and hold the
    required certificate, license and are competently
    skilled.
  • Pre-start checks must be carried out daily or in
    accordance with councils policy/procedures.
  • Where any plant is found to have a defect, damage
    or other fault that may create an unsafe
    condition, this must be reported to your
    supervisor immediately.
  • When operating plant be aware of other plant /
    people around your working area, ensure all
    warning devices are operating.
  • Prior to excavation/trenching ensure all
    underground/above services are identified.
  • Ensure when leaving any plant parked is secured
    in a safe condition. (OHSW Regs. 1995 Div
    3 Plant )

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3.29 Plant Maintenance
  • Any maintenance work of/on plant, should be
    carried out in accordance with the manufacturers
    requirements or council policy/procedures.
  • Never attempt to service or repair equipment
    unless you are qualified and authorised and have
    the appropriate tools to do the work.
  • Before starting any maintenance work the Plant
    MUST BE isolated, hydraulic pressure released and
    locked out, all plant MUST BE chocked, blocked to
    allow safe access / egress.
  • All safety guards, barriers, bars must be put in
    place where fitted.
  • All maintenance work carried out on all plant
    equipment must be recorded in the plant service
    log book.

64
Fuel Tank
65
3.30 Lifting and Slinging
  • Many injuries and damage to equipment have
    resulted during incorrect lifting of equipment
  • If you are required to carry out a
    slinging/lifting task then a safe lift requires
    planning and conducted under supervision of a
    competent/experienced employee.
  • Before you take part in a slinging or lifting
    task, make sure that you are aware of the safe
    work procedures, mass/weight of the
    equipment/materials being lifted.
  • How to use slings, chains and other attachments
    for the lifting and slinging of the load and
    correct use of signals.
  • (OHSW Regs. 1995 3.2.29 )
  • Under no circumstances are you permitted to work,
    stand or at any time be under the suspended load,
    and you MUST ALWAYS use the appropriate PPE.
    (AS/NZ Standard 1418.5 )

66
3.31 Working Near Plant
  • Operators of plant are often engaged on complete
    tasks and due to the nature of their plant may
    have restricted visibility, although they may be
    aware of the activities they may not be able to
    see you.
  • To help protect yourself when working with or
    near plant
  • Wear high visibility garments at all times
  • Wear your safety helmet if working within
    operational areas of plant
  • Remain aware of sounds around you, particularly
    the audible warning devices.
  • Make and maintain eye contact with the operator
    if you are moving into the plant operational
    area.

67
3.32 Formwork
  • Possible Hazards arising include (some basic
    examples )
  • Overloading Design or Construction Faults
  • Unstable Ground Missing or incorrectly installed
    Fittings
  • Inadequate bracing or ties Mobile plant
    contacting formwork
  • Unsafe work practices Incorrect or rapid
    placement of concrete

OHSW Regs. 1995 part 5 Hazardous Work
3.33 Cranes
Safety Procedures include (some basic
examples) Only persons with certificate of
competency can operate a crane Only person with
certificate of competency in dogging, rigging can
select, sling and direct loads. All cranes
subject to daily checks/logbook
inspections. Ensure crane is set up correctly and
SWLs are never exceeded
68
3.34 Portable Grinders, Flame Cutting and Welding
  • Safety Procedures Include
  • Suitable eye protection, gloves, with other task
    related PPE.
  • Ensure all guards are in place
  • Remove all combustible from the fall Zone and
    use fire spotters where needed.
  • Ensure all fire fighting equipment is readily
    available
  • Never work off ladders with equipment such as
    angle grinders
  • Ensure signage is in place to warn others of
    activities
  • (OHSW Regs. 1995 part 5 Hazardous Work, Council
    OHSW Policy 6.4, 6.6 and 6.10 ))

69
3.35 Concrete Sawing Drilling.
  • Involves Many Hazards Including
  • Poor condition of machinery and blades
  • Incorrect blades or installation
  • Asphyxiation or carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Power cables and services in slabs, wall cavities
  • Vibration. Noise and associated issues
  • Dust, water and slurry
  • Cutting overhead and from height
  • Other manual handling issues
  • Adjacent personnel and public safety
  • Road traffic conditions and risks

70
Section 4 Safety Signs
  • Safety Sign draw attention to objects and
    situations affecting health and safety.
  • They are administrative controls on the control
    hierarchy and as such are an important part of
    the Hazard Management Program.
  • It should be noted that safety signs do not
    replace the need for other accident or hazardous
    prevention measures.

71
4.1 Sign Layouts.
  • AS/NZ 1319-1994 sets out the size, shape and
    colour of the signs in four categories.
  • With the exception of danger signs they are
    mainly symbolic in their design.
  • They are
  • Regulatory signs
  • Hazard signs
  • Emergency Information signs
  • Fire signs

72
4.2 Regulatory Signs
  • Regulatory signs contain instructions with which
    failure to comply constitutes either and offence
    by law, or a breach of standing orders, safety
    procedures or other workplace directions
  • There are three type of regulatory signs
  • Prohibition signs.
  • Signs that indicate that an action or activity is
    not permitted
  • Mandatory signs
  • Signs that indicate that an instruction must be
    carried out.
  • Limitation or Restriction signs.
  • Signs that place a numerical or other defined
    limit on an activity or use of a facility

73
4.3 Hazard Signs advise of hazards
  • There are two types of Hazard signs
  • 4.3 Danger signs
  • Signs warning of a particular hazard or hazardous
    consideration that is likely to be life
    threatening.
  • 4.3 Warning signs.
  • Signs warning of a hazard or hazardous condition
    they is not likely to be life threatening.
  • 4.4 Emergency Information signs.
  • Indicate the location of, or directions to,
    emergency related facilities such as exits,
    safety equipment or first aid facilitates
  • 4.4 Fire signs
  • Advise the location of fire alarms, fire fighting
    facilities and exits.

74
4.5 Other Signs and Procedures
  • Another form of signs used on site are the danger
    tags or locks and out of service tags. These
    tags are designed to prevent another person
    activating any equipment, valve, electrical
    supply, switch or tap which may place you at risk.

75
4.5.1 Danger Tag or Lock-Out
  • The personal danger tag should be placed on the
    main isolating switch, valve etc once it has
    been set to the non dangerous position.
  • Be aware that there may be more than one hazard
    that needs to be isolated.
  • Lock outs may be used in conjunction with a
    danger tag.
  • Remember, generally the only person who can
    remove a danger tag or personal lock-out device
    is the person who placed it.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 Part 2 General Workplace
    Council OHSW Policies 6.19 6.21.

76
4.5.2 Out of Service Tag
  • Out of Service tag
  • This tag is used to identify faulty equipment
    that is being serviced, it can be placed by any
    person
  • It also can be removed by any person who has made
    the equipment safe, It does not offer any
    personal protection.

4.6 Electrical Appliance Test Tags.
Out of Service tag These tags are attached by a
competent person to electric tools, equipment,
appliances, leads etc to record periodic testing
has been conducted. Colour coding for the period
in general indicates when test performed. Jan
Mar (Red) April Jun (Green) July Sept
(Blue) Oct Dec (Yellow)
77
Section 5 Clean, Safe, Tidy Work Sites
  • BRIEF
  • Employees must be provided with and instructed
    on, safe systems of work, part of this process is
    working as a team to ensure clean, safe and tidy
    workplaces, sites and depots.
  • All parties employer / employees under section 19
    21 of the OHSW Act 1986 are made aware of their
    responsibilities also identified in the OHSW Regs
    1995 part 2 General Workplace
  • Remember, a clean and tidy site, workplace or
    depot promotes health and safety.

78
5.1 Access and Egress
  • When referring to access and egress, with respect
    to OHSW, we define it as safe entry and exit
    during normal work activities and in the case of
    emergency.
  • OHSW Regs 1995 2.1.1
  • The purpose of a safe access and egress is so a
    person may
  • Move conveniently and safely about the workplace
  • Leave the workplace in an event of an emergency
  • Have safe access to any place or workplace
    amenity
  • In the interests of OHSW where access and egress
    passages or spaces need to be clearly identified,
    the boundaries must be clearly marked for this
    purpose.
  • Access ways must be kept clear, clean and be
    suitably illuminated, they must not be used for
    storage of materials or debris.

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5.2 Barricades
  • When working in an are that has a potential risk
    to workers on site or the general public, the
    area must be barricaded off with one of the
    following
  • Hoarding Panels/Fencing
  • Should effectively restrict public access and
    make your site more secure keep all gates shut.
  • Para- Webbing
  • To limit the public and fellow workers entering a
    designated work area and protect from possible
    injury.
  • Bunting
  • To highlight hazards, prevent fellow workers
    entering a specific area, additional bracing may
    be required for mesh clad fencing.
  • Suitable signage must be used at all times in
    conjunction with any for a barricade

81
5.3 Housekeeping
  • Housekeeping is an important component of OHSW
    and must be approached in a systematic manner.
  • The workplace must be continually inspected with
    any hazards identified and controlled
  • The role of housekeeping is not to patch up the
    issue but to find appropriate solutions.

5.4 Storage
When storing materials, products, containers, and
other items you must ensure that it is done
safely, a place for everything and everything in
its place. So as to ensure that materials
cannot, while stacked or stored fall on a person
and allows safe retrieval of the items stored.
82
5.5 Removal Of Debris
  • Debris should be removed progressively from your
    work site in such a manner so as to prevent
  • Any build up of debris that could effect access
    egress on site
  • Any build up of debris that could become a fire
    hazard / risk.
  • Any build up on a floor or surface that could
    effect the integrity of the floor or surface

5.6 Site Amenities.
Employers must ensure that workers have access to
clean drinking water, toilets and amenities
should be provided in accordance with OHSW Regs.
1995 part 2 General Workplace. With regard to
permanent or temporary arrangements
83
5.7 Litter
  • Food scraps, and wrappings must be disposed of in
    approved waste containers.
  • Litter must be stored in a manner so as not to
    create a risk to the environment by encroaching
    into storm water drains or adjacent areas through
    the action of weather.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 part 2 General Workplace.

5.8 Site Disturbance
Vehicles should enter and leave sites via
nominated routes to limit tracking of mud, soil
onto public roads where possible. Always ensure
that loads are stable and or covered to prevent
materials littering into or onto public places.
84
5.9 Dust
  • The appropriate amount of water should be applied
    to roads and stockpiles to limit dust nuisance
    pollution of public areas

5.10 Sediment Barriers
Sediment barriers are any structure or devices
such as hay, straw bales, sediment fences or geo
barrier used to control soil erosion and/or
sediment deposits. Minimise disturbance to the
site, preserving grassed areas will assist in
filtering sediment from storm water runoff. The
Storm water Pollution Prevention Code of Practice
for the Building Construction Industry issue by
the EPA provides practical guidance on meeting
legislative requirements.
85
5.11 Stockpiled Materials
  • All stockpiles must be placed in an approved
    location with sediment barriers where appropriate.

5.12 Concrete, Brickwork, and Plastering Work
All residues and waste generated must not enter
the storm water systems, on site mixing must be
carried out in an area capable of containing all
excess water, residue and waste. Solid waste must
be disposed of to licensed disposal collection
depots.
86
5.13 Brick Cutting
  • Brick cutting activities that produce surplus
    wastewater must not be carried out on public
    roads, footpaths or reserves, all waste water
    from brick cutting must be prevented from
    entering storm water systems.
  • Surplus water to be recycled or contained in an
    area for drying by soakage.

5.14 Painting
Paint waste and washed waters must not be
discharged to the storm water system. Water based
paint cleaning must be diverted into a contained
area on site lined with newspaper, then disposed
of as a solid waste when dry. Oil based cleaning
must be filtered for reuse or taken to a licensed
waste depot.
87
Section 6 Licenses Certificates of Competency
  • Various qualifications, licenses, tickets,
    permits and registrations are required for
    persons involved in various building
    construction work
  • There are numerous types required according to
    the specific type of work being done, many
    activities are also controlled by approved Codes
    of Practice.
  • The following is an overview of common
    requirements, always check with the industry
    association or appropriate authority to determine
    what you need to carry out your work.

88
6.1 Office of Consumer Business Affairs,
Business Occupational Services
  • Telephone
  • Builders 8204 9644
  • Plumbers, Gas Fitters Electricians 8204
    9696
  • (Building Registration, Building Work
    Supervisors Registration, Plumbing, Gasfitting,
    Electrical Contractors License and/or
    registrations)

6.2 SafeWork SA Inspectorate
Telephone SafeWork SA Asbestos 8303 0405
Certification 8303 0481 Dangerous Goods 8303
0420 Certificate of Competencies
in Scaffolding Dogging Rigging Crane Operation
Hoist Operation Pressure Equipment Load Shifting
Equipment Bulldozer, Skid Steer, Front End
Loader, Forklift, Excavator, Drag Line Also
license to carry out- Asbestos removal work and
asbestos work.
89
6.3 Environment Protection Agency (EPA)
  • Telephone 8204 2000
  • License to produce, store, and transport
    prescribed waste
  • Ozone accreditation assessment
  • Exemption to carry on a prohibited activity
  • Earth work Drainage
  • Dredging

6.4 Local Councils
Permits obtained from the local council where the
site is situated when work is over or under
council streets, footpaths or reserves. e.g. lay
underground cables and services, connect storm
water drainage, erect hoardings or barriers and
create and obstruction to a public place.
90
6.5 Transport SA
  • Telephone 8348 9550
  • Over dimensional (Over Mass vehicle Permit )
  • Traffic and Road Engineering Restrictions/Modifica
    tions
  • Permit to work on or near roads (TSA)

6.6 Other Permits
Explosive powered tools operators ticket Permit
to enter confined spaces Hot work permit Permit
to use plant on suspended floors Scaffold permits
and tags.
91
Section 7 Accident Incident Reporting.
  • Brief
  • The term Work Related Injury is defined in
    section 4 OHSW 1986, an injury may be
    considered as work related if it occurs at work
    or arises from a work practice or the conditions
    in a workplace.
  • Work related injuries include the recurrence,
    aggravation or exacerbation of previous work
    related injuries.
  • An accident is an unplanned occurrence or
    incident that causes or contributes to personal
    injury or damage to property
  • Under section 34(1) OHSW Act 1986 and Division
    6.6 of the OHSW Regs 1995, you must report and
    incident immediately, no matter ho minor.
  • This includes near misses as well as accidents
    resulting in injury or damage.
  • Employers are also required to keep records of
    injuries OHSW Regs 1995 Section 1.3.7
    (Council OHSW Policy 6.12 )

92
7.1 Reporting Injuries.
  • When an accident occurs on site, the site
    supervisor, safety rep or employers rep must be
    notified immediately.
  • If the accident is of a serious nature it must
    also be reported to SafeWork SA as soon as
    practicable.
  • This includes
  • Any death
  • Any injury that as acute symptoms such as any
    exposure to a substance at work.
  • Any injury that requires treatment as an
    inpatient in a hospital.
  • Less serious injuries are not reported (SafeWork
    SA) except if it is a dangerous occurrence.
  • It is the responsibility of the Employer to
    ensure that an accident report is completed and
    forwarded details to relevant authorities.
  • ( Council OHSW Policy 6.12 )

93
7.2 Dangerous Occurrences
  • A dangerous occurrence is any incident or event
    which arises from operations carried out at a
    work place and which causes an immediate and
    significant risk to a person.
  • A person does not have to be injured, it is the
    risk that is important
  • There are specific dangerous occurrences that
    must be reported to SafeWork SA.
  • The collapse, overturning or failure of load
    bearing scaffolding, lift, crane, hoist or mine
    winding equipment
  • Damage to or malfunction of any other major plant
  • The collapse or failure of an excavation more
    than 1.5m deep (including any shoring )
  • The collapse or partial collapse of building or
    structure
  • The collapse of the floor, wall, ceiling of a
    building bearing used as a work place.

94
7.2 Dangerous Occurrences cont
  • An uncontrolled explosion, fire, escape of gas.
    Hazardous substance.
  • An electrical short circuit, malfunction or
    explosion
  • Breathing apparatus malfunctioning to the extent
    that the users health is in danger.
  • Any other unintended or uncontrolled incident or
    event arising from operations carried out at a
    workplace.
  • Any of these dangerous occurrence s must be
    reported to SafeWork SA Inspectorate, and written
    on the Notification of Dangerous Occurrence form
    within 24 hours SafeWork SA must be notified by
    phone as soon as the occurrence has happened.
  • (Council OHSW Policy 6.12)

95
7.3 Workers Compensation
  • All workers have the right to claim Workers
    Compensation if they are injured at work. If you
    intend to make a claim for medical expenses or
    lost wages you must
  • Complete the Workcover Claim for Compensation
    Form (as soon as possible after the accident.)
  • Attach a medical certificate and any notice of
    expense occurred as a result of the accident
  • Keep a copy of the form (blue copy) and other
    documents
  • When preparing to return to work from a work
    related injury or illness, you must obtain a
    medical clearance or certificate from your
    Doctor.
  • Your Council Claims Officer is Chris Birch and
    Council Rehabilitation Officer is Warren Couzens
    8580 3000. for further information you can speak
    with your immediate supervisor. ( Council
    OHSW Policy 6.2 )

96
7.4 First Aid
  • Under section 19(1) (B) of the OHSW Act, OHSW
    first aid facilities are described that must be
    provided by your employer.
  • Your employer provides first aid kits on site, in
    vehicles, at offices, depots, these kits are
    maintained to the Code of Practice for First Aid
    in the Workplace.
  • All items used from a first aid kit resulting
    from an incident at work, must be reported in the
    notebook provided in the kit.
  • Ensure that you make yourself aware where your
    workplace first aid kit is located and who to
    contact, when first aid is needed. ( Council
    OHSW Policy 6.14 )

97
Section 8 Site Emergency Evacuation
  • Brief
  • While it should be remembered that all sites are
    different by way of location, type of project,
    number of workers, equipment used and so on, the
    existence of an emergency plan covering such
    things as excavation and fire prevention must be
    common to all sites.
  • An emergency plan should be part of the overall
    work plan/method.
  • As in a work plan, the emergency plan must be
    assed in consultation with both the
    employer/employees or their representatives.
    (Council OHSW Policy 6.6)

98
8.1 Emergency Management Evacuation Procedures
  • In all work locations arrangements shall be made
    in consultation with site safety reps to ensure
  • An appropriate procedure exists for the
    protection of such personnel in the event of fire
    or other emergency occurring in the workplace or
    site.
  • Key personnel among the workers are nominated and
    trained to take control during and emergency
    procedure.
  • All persons are instructed in the workplace
    emergency procedure, and conduct appropriate
    practices exercises as often as required to
    ensure all persons are familiar with the
    procedure. (Council OHSW Policy 6.6.)

99
8.2 Emergency Plan
  • An appropriate procedure means a predetermined
    plan of action for dealing with emergency
    procedures
  • An emergency plan should provide for
  • An effective system for alerting emergency
    personnel and activating emergency procedures
  • An immediate response aimed at eliminating or
    early containment of a threat
  • A properly located decision-making control group
  • A reliable fail-safe communications system
  • A simple, effective and generally accepted
    evacuation procedure
  • Set-up and inform all people on site of a safety
    assembly point
  • Display in a prominent position local emergency
    telephone contacts
  • (Council OHSW Policy/Procedure 6.6 )

100
8.3 Responsibility
  • Overall compliance with the emergency plan and
    procedures is the responsibility of the employer
    or their representative who is in control of the
    workplace.
  • This means regular audits, tests of procedures,
    training and reviewing, updating all procedures
    based on current information.
  • (Council OHSW Policy 6.1 )

8.4 Possible Emergencies
  • The most likely emergency that may occur on a
    work site include, but are not limited to
  • Fire and smoke
  • All combustible materials
  • Toxic and /or flammable vapours emission
  • Vehicle or Plant Accident
  • Structural Collapse
  • Bomb or other threat
  • Chemical or hazardous substance spill

101
8.5 In an Emergency
  • Keep calm
  • Raise the alarm
  • Obtain help (inform emergency services if
    required)
  • Where the emergency is (street, suburb state)
  • What has happened
  • Who is calling, and
  • Do not hang up without receiving instructions on
    how to proceed.
  • If a person is injured do not move them unless
    they are in further danger if you do not.
  • Remember, only provide assistance within your
    capabilities as set out in section 7 Accident
    Reporting
  • Do not place yourself in danger to become another
    casualty/victim.

102
8.6 Fire Prevention
  • Under section 2.6.3 OHSW Regs. 1995, appropriate
    fire fighting facilities and where necessary
    fire-protection, must be available.
  • Portable fire extinguishers must be provided and
    installed at a workplace in accordance with AS/NZ
    Standard 2444 Portable Fire Extinguishers
    Selection Location.
  • Fire prevention in the Workplace can be assisted
  • By accumulated waste materials being removed
    regularly
  • Having flammable materials kept or handled in a
    safe manner to minimise the risk of fire
  • By the use of appropriate warning signs
  • And correct storage of any flammables
    materials/containers.
  • (Council OHSW Policies 6.6, 6.11, )

103
8.7 Fire Fighting Equipment Selection.
  • Water Fire Extinguisher
  • Designed to be used where the main hazard is
    wood, paper, textiles and rubbish (not suitable
    for electrical or flammable liquid fires)
  • Carbon Dioxide Extinguisher
  • Works by reducing the concentration of oxygen in
    the air to the level of combustion can no longer
    occur. (can be used on small flammable liquid
    fire e.g. petrol, paint, solvents )
  • Foam Fire Extinguishers
  • Designed to be used on A B flammable liquids
    such as petrol, paints solvents ( not suitable
    for electrical fires )
  • Dry Chemical Fire Extinguishers
  • This extinguisher is available in a variety of
    powders, to cover a wide ranges risk the
    extinguishing agent are safe, non-toxic and
    non-conductive

104
8.7 Fire Fighting Equipment Selection. Cont
  • Fire Hose Reels and Mains
  • Where a building on completion requires fire
    mains and /or fire hose reels to be installed
    pursuant to the Building Code of Australia, it is
    recommended that these facilities be available
    for fire fighting purposes.
  • Fire Blankets
  • Ideal for stove top fires and are easy to use,
    cooking oils fire are the most common cause of
    fires in kitchens
  • B.C.F. Extinguisher
  • THIS TYPE OF EXTINGUISHER IS NOW ILLEGAL

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Title: EMPLOYEE OHSW INDUCTION TRAINING MODULE - 2007


1
EMPLOYEE OHSW INDUCTIONTRAINING MODULE - 2007
  • Developed By Human Resources Officer
  • Warren Couzens Renmark Paringa Council 2007.
  • (Resource Safer Industries SA Building Civil
    Site Safety Induction Booklet Endorsed by
    Workcover Corporation 2006 LGA Employee
    Handbook 2006

2
Introduction
  • OHSW Induction training varies widely from
    organisation to organisation, but by its very
    nature an induction course covers specific
    information relevant to the organisation.
  • OHSW Induction training is a process rather than
    a once off course, informal information and
    instruction provided form a very important
    element

3
  • The Objectives
  • During the process employees will
  • Understand that Council is committed to health
    and safety
  • recognize that everyone in Council has a role to
    ensure a safe work environment
  • Be aware of fire and emergency procedures
  • Identify personnel with key health and safety
    responsibilities within Council.
  • be aware of Councils OHSWPolicies / Procedures

4
Contents
  • Duty Of Care
  • Hazard Management
  • (a) Personal Protective Equipment
  • 3) (b) Safe Use of Plant Equipment
  • Safety Signs
  • Clean, Safe Tidy Work Sites
  • Licenses, Tickets, Permits Registrations
  • Accident Incident Reporting
  • Site Emergency Evacuation

5
Section 1 Duty Of Care
  • Duty of care is the legal responsibility of every
    one including
  • Employers
  • Employees and health safety representatives
  • Self Employed
  • Designers
  • Occupiers of buildings
  • Owners of buildings
  • Owners of plant
  • Other people
  • Manufacturers Suppliers of machinery

As stated in the OHSW Act 1986 OHSW Regulations
1995 SA Approved Codes of Practice (including
numerous Australian Standards) OHSW Guidelines.
6
1.1 Employers Duties (refer to section 19 of the
Act)Every employer has duty to each employee to
ensure that as far as reasonably practicable, the
employee is, while at work, safe from injury and
risk to health.1.2 Employees Duties
(refer to section 21 of the Act )The employees
must take reasonable care to protect their own
health and safety and the health and safety of
others who may be affected by their actions at
work.
7
1.3 Duties of Various OthersThe OHSW Act,
sections 19 25 places duties on various people
who may affect health and safety at the
workplace including employers. The self
employed, owners, occupiers, employees,
designers, manufacturers, suppliers, importers,
erectors and installers
  • 1.4 ConsultationThe OHSW Act, as outlined in
    sections 33 34, requires the employer to
    consult the Health Safety Representative
    Health Safety Committee where change to a
    workplace, work process, policy or procedure may
    affect the health, safety or welfare of an
    employee at work.

8
1.5 The Act, Regulations, Codes StandardsAs
previously stated in this section, the OHSW Act
(1986) provides the foundation to health and
safety in the South Australian workplace.The
Act is supported by the OHSW Regulations 1995,
various approved Codes of Practice Australian
Standards
9
OHSW Act - 1986
  • Describes how to provide health safety in South
    Australian workplaces and is Law.

OHSW Regulations -1995
  • Are made under the Act and sets out general
    principles, providing the practical steps which
    should be followed in order to prevent injuries
    and illness at work.

Codes of Practice
  • Give you practical guidance on how to comply with
    the legal requirements of specific regulations
    and should be used in addition to the Act
    Regulations.

10
Australian / NZ Standards
  • Have been developed to provide minimal levels of
    performance or quality for a specific hazard,
    work process or product . If an AS/NZ Standard is
    listed in the Act and or regulation it becomes a
    part of it and must be followed.

Guidelines1. Developed by Workcover Corporation
Safework SA2. Developed by the specific
Industries it relates too
  • Guidelines for safe work are developed by
    tripartite committee to assist with regulatory
    requirements. Workcover Corporation and SafeWork
    SA guidelines are generic while industry
    guidelines are industry specific

11
Council OHSW Policies.
  • A policy is defined as a specific statement of
    principles or guiding actions that imply clear
    commitment by council a statement of values or
    intent that provides a basis for consistent
    decision making and resource allocation a guide
    to determine the present and future.

Council SWPs SOPs or WMS
  • Council recognizes that written safe work
    procedures are essential to ensure a safe work
    environment which also provide all employees
    information to perform tasks safely by a step
    by step description of the safest and most
    effective way to carry out a particular job.
  • Can also be known as Task Instruction, Work
    Instruction, Safe Operating Procedures or Work
    Method Statement.

12
Section 2 Hazard Management
  • A hazard is anything which has the potential to
    cause harm or loss.
  • The harm or loss may take the form of
  • An injury or disease (provide example)
  • Property damage (provide example )
  • Environmental harm. (provide example )

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Section 2 Hazard Management cont,
BRIEF. Prior to commencement of any phase of the
work process the employer and/or occupier shall
ensure that an investigation of the site is
conducted by a person competent in all aspects of
the work work plan method statement, prepared
and documented. This work plan should include
identification and assessment of any hazard and
control measures to be implemented All
potential hazards should be identified and
assessed in consultation with employees and/or
their representatives.
14
2.1 Identification. How do I identify a hazard ?
  • A Hazard may be
  • An object (i.e. dangerous goods ) or
  • A situation (i.e. inexperienced personnel )

This includes, but is not limited to Open
excavation Inhalation of dust, fibres, vapours
gases Noise vibration Extremes of temperature
humidity Bad housekeeping Poor access /
egress Poor lighting / visibility Live power
wiring Trips falls Working at
heights Dangerous goods Manual mechanical
handling Confined spaces Fire, Hygiene, Drugs
Alcohol
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2.1 Identification. How do I identify a hazard ?
cont
  • To identify hazards to health safety
  • check records of all injuries / incidents that
    have occurred in the workplace
  • undertake regular inspections of the workplace
    using checklists
  • Consult with employees or their representatives,
    on any potential hazards
  • refer to the OHSW Act Regulations any
    approved codes

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2.2 Assessment of Risk
  • Once hazards have been identified, they should be
    assessed in terms of their potential to cause
    harm, both now and in the future
  • When making an assessment on the possible risk to
    health/safety, the following must be considered
  • The likelihood that they will cause harm
    (Probability )
  • The severity of the harm they could do
    (Consequence ) and
  • The number of times people are exposed to the
    hazard (Frequency )

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2.2 Assessment of Risk cont
The assessment of the risk is a process of
gathering information in order to make a clear
and educated decision on which controls, need to
be implemented to eliminate or minimize the risk
level using all reasonably practicable measures.
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2.2 Risk Control.
Once hazards are identified and assessed,
measures to eliminate or minimise them must be
determined in accordance with the hierarchy of
control
2.3 Hierarchy Of Control
  • Elimination
  • Substitution
  • Isolation
  • Engineering
  • Administrative
  • Personal Protective Equipment

Best
Worst
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2.4 Hierarchy Of Control cont
Control measures which make the workplace safe
are likely to be more effective than measures
which protect employees from hazardous
worksite. When adopting measures to control a
hazardous risk, the hierarchy must be followed
when selecting the approach to be taken.
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2.4 Hierarchy Of Control cont
Measures from the top of hierarchy give better
results and must be adopted wherever
possible. Measures from the bottom of the
hierarchy are more difficult to maintain and must
be regarded as interim measures until preferred
ones can be implemented.
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2.4.1 Elimination
Elimination completely removes the hazard and is
the ideal control solution. Examples of
elimination includes ceasing to use a hazardous
substance and changing a process to remove the
need for a hazardous action.
2.4.2 Substitution
Substitution is where a hazard is replaced by a
less hazardous alternative, for example,
instead of using a hazardous item of plant or
equipment, substitute it for a less hazardous
item that serves the same purpose
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2.4.3 Isolation
Isolation involves separating the hazard from
people by the use of physical barriers to
contain/enclose the hazard or by distance and/or
time. An example is using a fully automated
rather than a manual process.
2.4.4 Engineering Control
If elimination, substitution or isolation cannot
be used effectively the next preferred measure is
engineering control. This may include
modification of tools and equipment guarding and
local exhaust ventilation
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2.4.5 Administrative Control
  • Where an unacceptable health safety risk still
    remains administrative controls must be used.
  • This involves the introduction of work practices
    which reduce risk by limiting the exposure to the
    worker from the hazard.
  • Measures may Include
  • Reducing the number of workers exposed period
    of exposure
  • Rotating work place activities
  • Special procedure to be followed for the use of
    chemicals, excavation procedures
  • Placing signs, effective training and
    Documentation.

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2.4.6 Personal Protective Equipment.
Personal Protective equipment must be used where
all other control measures have not been fully
effective. (your supervisor will issue you the
PPE) OHSW Regs 1995 2.12.1 Council OHSW
Policy 6.10
Application of Control Hierarchy
The employer must attempt to control the exposure
of the worker to hazards by first assessing
whether the most preferred control
measure/elimination is possible. If elimination
is not possible, the employer should assess
whether the next preferred control measure can be
achieved.
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2.5 Hazard Management Summary
  • Identify all hazards
  • Assess the levels of risk
  • Control the risk using control hierarchy
    principles
  • Consult with all members of the work team
  • Report all accidents/incidents no matter how
    small to your supervisor.
  • Regularly review the work process to ensure all
    members of the work team are complying and
    highlight any possible areas for improving hazard
    management systems.

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2.5 Hazard Management Summary cont.
Remember , you or others can cause a hazardous
situation by any act and/or omission. DO NOT HIDE
IT, REPORT IT ! Through consultation with others
on site the hazard can be controlled, do not
ignore it or you will be putting yourself and
others at risk.
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2.6 Hazard Substances or Situations 2.6.1
Asbestos.
  • Often found in the friable form do not attempt
    to remove any asbestos without prior knowledge or
    training in the procedures required.
  • OHSW Regs 1995 Section 4.2.1 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.23

2.6.2 Synthetic Mineral Fibers (SMFs)
SMF is a term used to describe fibres made from
glass, rock or other materials. SMFs are used
for installation purposes in the manufacture and
reinforcement of cement and plaster building
materials. OHSW Reg.s 1995 section 4.4.1
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2.6.3 Chemicals
Before handling any chemicals you must be aware
of the hazards involved with that particular
chemical through material safety data sheets
(MSDS) or, if in doubt, the chemical may have to
be isolated until appropriate safety measures are
put in place. OHSW Regs. 1995 sect. 4.1.1
4.1.3 Council OHSW Policy 6.11
2.6.4 Dust
Dust is common problem on construction sites,
processes such as excavation or demolition work
are major contributors to serious dust problems
Materials such as cement or gypsum bases also
create serious risk to health. OHSW Regs. 1995
section 2.4.3
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2.7 Excavations and Trenches
Any work around or in an excavated area or trench
is extremely dangerous, even the collapse of a
small trench has the potential to take life. No
person shall enter an excavation, pit or trench
exceeding 1.5 metre in depth unless appropriate
measures, such as benching, battering or shoring
are taken to prevent collapse. (OHSW Regs
1995. Sect. 5.5 .)
2.8 Compressed Air.
Compressed air is used to run pneumatic tools,
like nails guns, spray painting equipment and
jack Hammers. If precautions are not taken it can
be turned into a weapon a flailing hose can hit
like a hammer ! Do Not Use Compressed Air To Blow
Dust From Clothing This can cause Serious
Injury OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.4.4
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2.9 Confined Space
  • A confined space is a space of any volume which
  • Is not intended as a regular workplace
  • Has restricted means for entry and exit
  • May have inadequate ventilation and or
    atmosphere which is either contaminated or
    oxygen-deficient.
  • Where a confined space, as defined above, is to
    be entered, the requirements of AS/NZ 2865
    Safety Working in a Confined Space must be
    complied with and includes provisions for permits
    to work, rescue and first aid.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.1.4 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.17

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2.10 Electrical Equipment Mechanical Plant.
  • Where personnel are working on or near
  • Live electrical equipment
  • Exposed moving mechanical components, e.g,
    gears, drive shafts, pulleys
  • Areas where there could be a release of steam,
    chemicals, pressurized fluids or biological
    hazards
  • Action must be taken to isolate the system, on
    such a shutdown, a tag or lock out systems shall
    apply.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 5.7.1 Council OHSW Policy
    6.18 /6.21

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2.11 Housekeeping
  • Housekeeping is an important component of health
    and safety which must be approached in a
    systematic manner in order o maintain a clean
    safe and tidy workplace
  • The workplace must be regularly inspected with
    any hazards identified, assessed, eliminated or
    controlled.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.4.3 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.4

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2.12 Drugs and Alcohol
  • Employees, contractors, visitors or other persons
    at the worksite/place must not place themselves
    or others at risk because of consumption of
    alcohol or drugs.
  • You must not commence duties at work while in an
    unfit state due to alcohol or drugs, you must
    inform your Supervisor if you are own prescribed
    medication that may effect your ability to
    perform duties.
  • OHSW Act 1986 section 21 Council Policy 6.13

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2.13 Manual Handling
  • Manual handling is any work process that
    requires
  • Lifting Lowering Pushing Carrying Bending
  • Pulling Moving Holding Reaching Twisting
  • Each year 10.000 south Australians suffer
    injuries caused by incorrect manual handling
    techniques
  • When mechanical aids cannot be used, you must use
    correct manual handling practices
  • A risk assessment should be undertaken prior to
    the manual handling task
  • Do not try and lift heavy or awkward loads on
    your own seek assistance
  • REMEMBER, USE THE CORRECT RECOMMENDED MANUAL
    HANDLING TECHNIQUES IN THE WORKPLACE, AND AVOID
    BECOMING ANOTHER SOUTH AUSTRALIAN ON THE INJURY
    LIST.
  • OHSW Reg. 1995 section 2.9.1 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.5

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Section 3. (a) Personal Protective Equipment.
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is provided
    by your Employer for your safety, it is your
    responsibility to take good care of it and wear
    it as directed or required.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 sect. 2.12.1 Council OHSW
    Policy 6.10

3.1 Clothing PPE must be used to keep
contaminants from soiling clothes and /or being
transported outside the workplace. High
visibility garments and long sleeve shirts/pants
are appropriate methods for cover up exposure to
the suns harmful rays. Rings, bracelets and neck
chains must not be worn on work sites due to
risks associated with some work activities. OHSW
Regs. 1995 section 2.12.1 Council OHSW Policy
6.10
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3.2 Safety FootwearAppropriate footwear in
accordance with AS/NZ Standard 2210 must be worn
at all times whilst on site. If the site is wet
under foot, rubber boots with steel toe cap
should be worn.Any soft toe footwear is not
permitted to be worn on sites where the risk of
foot injury is evident.(OHSW Regs. 1995
section 2.12.1 - AS/NZ Standard 2210 )
  • 3.3 Head Protection
  • Ensure you carry a safety helmet with you at all
    times on building/construction sites and use
    whenever there is risk of any debris falling from
    above or any over head risk of head injury
  • Before entering any site check to see if the site
    policy requires person to wear hard hat
    protection part or full time. Safety helmets must
    comply with AS/NZ standard 1801.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.12.1 - AS/NZ
    Standard 1801)

41
3.4 Eye Protection
  • Appropriate eye protection must be worn if there
    is any likely risk of an eye injury/damage, and
    any signage on site(s) indicate policy
    requirement.
  • Ensure that eye protection you are wearing is
    applicable for the task performed. (OHSW Reg.
    1995 2.12 - AS/NZ Standard 1336 )

3.5 Hearing Protection
In Industry today one of the most common safety
issues is noise. You must always ensure that you
have the correct hearing protection e.g. ear
plugs, muffs and must be worn when there is risk
of hearing damage. (OHSW Reg. 1995 2.12 -
AS/NZ Standard 1270 )
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3.6 Gloves
Gloves are used to protect your hand from
injury/damage from certain hazards, they must be
worn to prevent injury, but ensure they
themselves do not create a hazard as such by
getting caught on/in moving objects. (OHSW
Reg. 1995 2.12 - AS/NZ Standard 2161)
3.7 Respiratory Protection
Failing to wear suitable respiratory protection
is probably one of the biggest contributors to
occupational death of workers in
Australia. Respiratory protection must be
properly used in workplaces where atmosphere may
be contaminated with potentially hazardous dust,
fibres, mists or vapours. (OHSW Reg. 1995 2.12
- AS/NZ Standard 1715 1716 )
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3.8 High Visibility Garments
High Visibility vests/garments must always be
worn whenever there is a risk of being struck by
mobile plant, traffic or other moving objects (or
part of your employers policy) you must ensure
the correct type is worn to suit day/night work
conditions. (OHSW Reg. 1995 2.12 )
3.9 Heat Stress / Exhaustion
Important to recognize the effects of climatic
conditions e.g. heat stress/exhaustion can occur
when working in excessive heat particularly in
conjunction with high humidity and direct
exposure to the sun. You must refer to your
employers policy related to climatic conditions.
( Council Policy No. 6.8 )
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3.10 Fatigue
  • We are familiar with the pain associated with
    physical fatigue how it effects our ability to
    perform efficiently safely.
  • We need to give our bodies and minds adequate
    rest to recover from the stresses of work, family
    and personal lives and there keep and maintain a
    healthy lifestyle.
  • (LGA Healthy Lifestyle Programmes )

3.11 Balancing Work and Recreation Time.
Shift work, long hours often make it difficult to
balance work requirements, personal and family
responsibilities, how we prepare and recuperate
from work recreation will have a direct affect
on work performance and injury rates. (LGA
Healthy Lifestyle Programmes )
46
Section 3 (b) - Safe use of Plant Equipment
  • 3.12 Hand Tools

Use only the correct tool for the job ! All hand
tools must be in good repair, spades, shovels,
axes etc heads must properly wedged on shaft
handles with no splits, the right tool for the
task must be selected and used. (SWP No. 800 )
3.13 Power Tools
When using equipment like power tools, you must
ensure that they are in good working condition
and fitted with appropriate safety guards,
electrical tools equipment must be tagged and
tested as per standards. Before after a job you
must inspect the tool and report any defects to
your supervisor who will arrange for repairs or
replacement. (SWP No. 801 )
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3.14 Safe Use of Ladders
  • Using a ladder safely includes
  • Work undertaken from a ladder should be
    performed whilst the worker is facing the
    ladder.
  • Always maintain 3 points of contact and no over
    reaching.
  • Only one person on the ladder at any one time.
  • Do not use metal ladders where electricity work
    exists, and keep out swing arc of doorways.
    (unless cordoned off )
  • ladders should be secured against movement and
    be supported from a firm, level, non slip
    surface at a ration of 41 and secured at top
    and bottom.
  • Inspected prior to and after use and before
    storage, report any defects. (SWP No. 107 706
    )

48
3.15 Working at Heights
  • If there is any risk of injury due to a fall from
    a height, then appropriate protection must be
    provided.
  • Where work is carried out at heights other than
    off a ladder, consideration must be given to the
    following alternatives
  • Scaffolding Elevating Work Platforms
    Cranes
  • Scissor lifts Static Lines Edge
    Protection
  • Safe Use of Safety Harness and Lanyards.
  • DO NOT alter or reposition scaffold or use
    scaffold that appears incomplete, damaged,
    unsuitable or has a danger or Out of Service tag
    attached.
  • Division 2.13 OHSW Regs. 1995 Prevention of
    Falls,
  • with reference to AS/NZ Standards 1576
    Scaffolding parts 1-4.
  • AS/NZ 1657 Fixed Platforms, Walkways, Stairways
    and Ladders.
  • AS/NZ 1891 Industrial Safety Belts Harnesses
    and
  • AS/NZ 1892 Portable Ladders

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3.16 Scaffolding
  • Scaffolding is the most common used type of
    working platform used on site, all scaffolding
    over 4 metres in height must be erected by a
    holder of a certificates of competency for the
    erection of scaffolding. (SWP No. 710)

3.17 Electrical Leads and Wiring
Before using electrical extensions cords,
portable electrical tools must be checked prior
to any use. Each item must be tested /tagged with
the appropriate colour coded tag, all portable
electrical equipment must be used in conjunction
with a portable earth leakage circuit breaker
(ELCB) (Council Policy 6.18 )
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3.18 Traffic Control
  • Many projects are carried out on or near public
    roads and the risk of injury to workers, public
    and damage to plant/equipment is always present.
  • A high visibility garment must be worn at all
    times, day/night
  • Traffic control devices must be placed in
    accordance with Traffic Control Devices AS/NZ
    standard 1742.3.
  • Workers setting up a workzone must be trained in
    Workzone Traffic Management.
  • ( your employer will provide this training )
  • Report any incident, unauthorized relocation or
    incorrect use of traffic control devices to your
    direct supervisor.

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53
3.19 Working Near Services (Under or Above
Ground)
  • Before you start work at a site check to see that
    all services have been identified, marked or
    flagged off.
  • Look around your work area (do a walk through
    first) see if there is evidence of any services,
    you may notice poles, overhead wires, taps, gas,
    water mains and markers.
  • If you come across something that you are unsure
    of, stop work and seek advice from your
    supervisor
  • Stop work and report immediately any damage to
    your supervisor, where safe to do so isolate the
    area, and do not restart any work until directed.
  • Always use your employer pre-work site checklist
    to identify any services prior to commencing any
    work

54
3.20 Working with Lasers.
  • The OHSW regulations 3.2.31 require that lasers
    are labelled in accordance the AS/NZ standard
    2211.
  • Lasers must remain in the control of an
    authorized, competent person and not be
    deliberately aimed at other persons.
  • The laser beam path, should be located below or
    well above the normal eye level of other
    employees and appropriate signage must be set up
    to warn others that lasers operations are in
    progress.
  • Workers required to operate laser equipment must
    be trained to a level that suits the class of the
    laser they use.
  • OHSW Regs.1995 section 3.2.31 AS/NZ Standard
    2211

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3.22 Explosive Powered Tools
3.21 Personnel Working Overhead
Place suitable signage and barriers to warn and
protect all people that may be effected by
overhead work, secure all tools and
materials. Provide overhead protection where
required such as when working in areas of
potential head injury. (OHSW Regs. 1995 -5.2.4
)
  • Only competent and trained persons shall operate
    explosive powered tools to minimise the risk of
    injury such as
  • Noise
  • Possible free flight of the fastener
    penetrating material
  • Materials shattering and spraying materials
  • Ricochet materials

56
3.22 Demolition
  • Demolition work entails an extensive range of
    hazards which requires strategies that consider
    the following but are not limited to-
  • structural stability during demolition and
    temporary propping /stabilization including
    adjacent structures.
  • Fire prevention and protection
  • safe access / egress for workers.
  • Methods of controlling dust and noise emissions
  • safe removal of debris
  • Public protection requirements
  • statutory authority requirements.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 5.2.1

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3.24 Live Cables, Energised Plant and Other
Services.
  • A thorough site investigation must locate all
    live cables, plant and services before work
    commences, whether they be underground or
    overhead
  • Special attention for hazards such as-
  • Overhead powerlines , bus bars to equipment such
    as bridge and gantry cranes
  • Overhead services
  • Underground or otherwise hidden cables
    services
  • Cabling in wall chases and cavities
  • Cracked or faulty insulation on equipment
  • Equipment that is overhanging
  • These must be clearly marked and all employees
    made aware.

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3.25 Stressed Concrete and Tilt Up Construction
  • Possible hazards that require special attention
    include-
  • Design and construction faults
  • Stressing forces
  • Cables and tendons
  • Poor training and limited experience
  • Working at height
  • Falling objects
  • Plant
  • Weather

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3.26 Noise
  • Personal hearing protection (ear muffs or plugs
    or both ) must be worn when noise emissions can
    cause a risk to hearing loss or damage and / or
    is above 90 decibels (A)
  • (as per the exposure standard )
  • Always consider other people (whether on site or
    not ). If they are affected by your noisy work
    operations you may need to reschedule the work or
    warn others.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 section 2.10.1

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3.27 Personal Hygiene and Safety
  • Personal cleanliness is important to prevent work
    related illness and the spread of infection.
  • Washing you hands before eating, drinking or
    smoking will reduce the risk of hazardous
    substances entering your body through skin
    absorption or ingestion.
  • Long hair must be confined so ti will not become
    entangled in plant equipment or machinery or
    similar reason for loose clothing and jewellery.
  • Division 2 OHSW Regs. 1995.

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3.28 Operating Plant
  • Do not drive or operate any plant unless you are
    trained, authorised to do so and hold the
    required certificate, license and are competently
    skilled.
  • Pre-start checks must be carried out daily or in
    accordance with councils policy/procedures.
  • Where any plant is found to have a defect, damage
    or other fault that may create an unsafe
    condition, this must be reported to your
    supervisor immediately.
  • When operating plant be aware of other plant /
    people around your working area, ensure all
    warning devices are operating.
  • Prior to excavation/trenching ensure all
    underground/above services are identified.
  • Ensure when leaving any plant parked is secured
    in a safe condition. (OHSW Regs. 1995 Div
    3 Plant )

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3.29 Plant Maintenance
  • Any maintenance work of/on plant, should be
    carried out in accordance with the manufacturers
    requirements or council policy/procedures.
  • Never attempt to service or repair equipment
    unless you are qualified and authorised and have
    the appropriate tools to do the work.
  • Before starting any maintenance work the Plant
    MUST BE isolated, hydraulic pressure released and
    locked out, all plant MUST BE chocked, blocked to
    allow safe access / egress.
  • All safety guards, barriers, bars must be put in
    place where fitted.
  • All maintenance work carried out on all plant
    equipment must be recorded in the plant service
    log book.

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Fuel Tank
65
3.30 Lifting and Slinging
  • Many injuries and damage to equipment have
    resulted during incorrect lifting of equipment
  • If you are required to carry out a
    slinging/lifting task then a safe lift requires
    planning and conducted under supervision of a
    competent/experienced employee.
  • Before you take part in a slinging or lifting
    task, make sure that you are aware of the safe
    work procedures, mass/weight of the
    equipment/materials being lifted.
  • How to use slings, chains and other attachments
    for the lifting and slinging of the load and
    correct use of signals.
  • (OHSW Regs. 1995 3.2.29 )
  • Under no circumstances are you permitted to work,
    stand or at any time be under the suspended load,
    and you MUST ALWAYS use the appropriate PPE.
    (AS/NZ Standard 1418.5 )

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3.31 Working Near Plant
  • Operators of plant are often engaged on complete
    tasks and due to the nature of their plant may
    have restricted visibility, although they may be
    aware of the activities they may not be able to
    see you.
  • To help protect yourself when working with or
    near plant
  • Wear high visibility garments at all times
  • Wear your safety helmet if working within
    operational areas of plant
  • Remain aware of sounds around you, particularly
    the audible warning devices.
  • Make and maintain eye contact with the operator
    if you are moving into the plant operational
    area.

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3.32 Formwork
  • Possible Hazards arising include (some basic
    examples )
  • Overloading Design or Construction Faults
  • Unstable Ground Missing or incorrectly installed
    Fittings
  • Inadequate bracing or ties Mobile plant
    contacting formwork
  • Unsafe work practices Incorrect or rapid
    placement of concrete

OHSW Regs. 1995 part 5 Hazardous Work
3.33 Cranes
Safety Procedures include (some basic
examples) Only persons with certificate of
competency can operate a crane Only person with
certificate of competency in dogging, rigging can
select, sling and direct loads. All cranes
subject to daily checks/logbook
inspections. Ensure crane is set up correctly and
SWLs are never exceeded
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3.34 Portable Grinders, Flame Cutting and Welding
  • Safety Procedures Include
  • Suitable eye protection, gloves, with other task
    related PPE.
  • Ensure all guards are in place
  • Remove all combustible from the fall Zone and
    use fire spotters where needed.
  • Ensure all fire fighting equipment is readily
    available
  • Never work off ladders with equipment such as
    angle grinders
  • Ensure signage is in place to warn others of
    activities
  • (OHSW Regs. 1995 part 5 Hazardous Work, Council
    OHSW Policy 6.4, 6.6 and 6.10 ))

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3.35 Concrete Sawing Drilling.
  • Involves Many Hazards Including
  • Poor condition of machinery and blades
  • Incorrect blades or installation
  • Asphyxiation or carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Power cables and services in slabs, wall cavities
  • Vibration. Noise and associated issues
  • Dust, water and slurry
  • Cutting overhead and from height
  • Other manual handling issues
  • Adjacent personnel and public safety
  • Road traffic conditions and risks

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Section 4 Safety Signs
  • Safety Sign draw attention to objects and
    situations affecting health and safety.
  • They are administrative controls on the control
    hierarchy and as such are an important part of
    the Hazard Management Program.
  • It should be noted that safety signs do not
    replace the need for other accident or hazardous
    prevention measures.

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4.1 Sign Layouts.
  • AS/NZ 1319-1994 sets out the size, shape and
    colour of the signs in four categories.
  • With the exception of danger signs they are
    mainly symbolic in their design.
  • They are
  • Regulatory signs
  • Hazard signs
  • Emergency Information signs
  • Fire signs

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4.2 Regulatory Signs
  • Regulatory signs contain instructions with which
    failure to comply constitutes either and offence
    by law, or a breach of standing orders, safety
    procedures or other workplace directions
  • There are three type of regulatory signs
  • Prohibition signs.
  • Signs that indicate that an action or activity is
    not permitted
  • Mandatory signs
  • Signs that indicate that an instruction must be
    carried out.
  • Limitation or Restriction signs.
  • Signs that place a numerical or other defined
    limit on an activity or use of a facility

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4.3 Hazard Signs advise of hazards
  • There are two types of Hazard signs
  • 4.3 Danger signs
  • Signs warning of a particular hazard or hazardous
    consideration that is likely to be life
    threatening.
  • 4.3 Warning signs.
  • Signs warning of a hazard or hazardous condition
    they is not likely to be life threatening.
  • 4.4 Emergency Information signs.
  • Indicate the location of, or directions to,
    emergency related facilities such as exits,
    safety equipment or first aid facilitates
  • 4.4 Fire signs
  • Advise the location of fire alarms, fire fighting
    facilities and exits.

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4.5 Other Signs and Procedures
  • Another form of signs used on site are the danger
    tags or locks and out of service tags. These
    tags are designed to prevent another person
    activating any equipment, valve, electrical
    supply, switch or tap which may place you at risk.

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4.5.1 Danger Tag or Lock-Out
  • The personal danger tag should be placed on the
    main isolating switch, valve etc once it has
    been set to the non dangerous position.
  • Be aware that there may be more than one hazard
    that needs to be isolated.
  • Lock outs may be used in conjunction with a
    danger tag.
  • Remember, generally the only person who can
    remove a danger tag or personal lock-out device
    is the person who placed it.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 Part 2 General Workplace
    Council OHSW Policies 6.19 6.21.

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4.5.2 Out of Service Tag
  • Out of Service tag
  • This tag is used to identify faulty equipment
    that is being serviced, it can be placed by any
    person
  • It also can be removed by any person who has made
    the equipment safe, It does not offer any
    personal protection.

4.6 Electrical Appliance Test Tags.
Out of Service tag These tags are attached by a
competent person to electric tools, equipment,
appliances, leads etc to record periodic testing
has been conducted. Colour coding for the period
in general indicates when test performed. Jan
Mar (Red) April Jun (Green) July Sept
(Blue) Oct Dec (Yellow)
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Section 5 Clean, Safe, Tidy Work Sites
  • BRIEF
  • Employees must be provided with and instructed
    on, safe systems of work, part of this process is
    working as a team to ensure clean, safe and tidy
    workplaces, sites and depots.
  • All parties employer / employees under section 19
    21 of the OHSW Act 1986 are made aware of their
    responsibilities also identified in the OHSW Regs
    1995 part 2 General Workplace
  • Remember, a clean and tidy site, workplace or
    depot promotes health and safety.

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5.1 Access and Egress
  • When referring to access and egress, with respect
    to OHSW, we define it as safe entry and exit
    during normal work activities and in the case of
    emergency.
  • OHSW Regs 1995 2.1.1
  • The purpose of a safe access and egress is so a
    person may
  • Move conveniently and safely about the workplace
  • Leave the workplace in an event of an emergency
  • Have safe access to any place or workplace
    amenity
  • In the interests of OHSW where access and egress
    passages or spaces need to be clearly identified,
    the boundaries must be clearly marked for this
    purpose.
  • Access ways must be kept clear, clean and be
    suitably illuminated, they must not be used for
    storage of materials or debris.

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5.2 Barricades
  • When working in an are that has a potential risk
    to workers on site or the general public, the
    area must be barricaded off with one of the
    following
  • Hoarding Panels/Fencing
  • Should effectively restrict public access and
    make your site more secure keep all gates shut.
  • Para- Webbing
  • To limit the public and fellow workers entering a
    designated work area and protect from possible
    injury.
  • Bunting
  • To highlight hazards, prevent fellow workers
    entering a specific area, additional bracing may
    be required for mesh clad fencing.
  • Suitable signage must be used at all times in
    conjunction with any for a barricade

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5.3 Housekeeping
  • Housekeeping is an important component of OHSW
    and must be approached in a systematic manner.
  • The workplace must be continually inspected with
    any hazards identified and controlled
  • The role of housekeeping is not to patch up the
    issue but to find appropriate solutions.

5.4 Storage
When storing materials, products, containers, and
other items you must ensure that it is done
safely, a place for everything and everything in
its place. So as to ensure that materials
cannot, while stacked or stored fall on a person
and allows safe retrieval of the items stored.
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5.5 Removal Of Debris
  • Debris should be removed progressively from your
    work site in such a manner so as to prevent
  • Any build up of debris that could effect access
    egress on site
  • Any build up of debris that could become a fire
    hazard / risk.
  • Any build up on a floor or surface that could
    effect the integrity of the floor or surface

5.6 Site Amenities.
Employers must ensure that workers have access to
clean drinking water, toilets and amenities
should be provided in accordance with OHSW Regs.
1995 part 2 General Workplace. With regard to
permanent or temporary arrangements
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5.7 Litter
  • Food scraps, and wrappings must be disposed of in
    approved waste containers.
  • Litter must be stored in a manner so as not to
    create a risk to the environment by encroaching
    into storm water drains or adjacent areas through
    the action of weather.
  • OHSW Regs. 1995 part 2 General Workplace.

5.8 Site Disturbance
Vehicles should enter and leave sites via
nominated routes to limit tracking of mud, soil
onto public roads where possible. Always ensure
that loads are stable and or covered to prevent
materials littering into or onto public places.
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5.9 Dust
  • The appropriate amount of water should be applied
    to roads and stockpiles to limit dust nuisance
    pollution of public areas

5.10 Sediment Barriers
Sediment barriers are any structure or devices
such as hay, straw bales, sediment fences or geo
barrier used to control soil erosion and/or
sediment deposits. Minimise disturbance to the
site, preserving grassed areas will assist in
filtering sediment from storm water runoff. The
Storm water Pollution Prevention Code of Practice
for the Building Construction Industry issue by
the EPA provides practical guidance on meeting
legislative requirements.
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5.11 Stockpiled Materials
  • All stockpiles must be placed in an approved
    location with sediment barriers where appropriate.

5.12 Concrete, Brickwork, and Plastering Work
All residues and waste generated must not enter
the storm water systems, on site mixing must be
carried out in an area capable of containing all
excess water, residue and waste. Solid waste must
be disposed of to licensed disposal collection
depots.
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5.13 Brick Cutting
  • Brick cutting activities that produce surplus
    wastewater must not be carried out on public
    roads, footpaths or reserves, all waste water
    from brick cutting must be prevented from
    entering storm water systems.
  • Surplus water to be recycled or contained in an
    area for drying by soakage.

5.14 Painting
Paint waste and washed waters must not be
discharged to the storm water system. Water based
paint cleaning must be diverted into a contained
area on site lined with newspaper, then disposed
of as a solid waste when dry. Oil based cleaning
must be filtered for reuse or taken to a licensed
waste depot.
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Section 6 Licenses Certificates of Competency
  • Various qualifications, licenses, tickets,
    permits and registrations are required for
    persons involved in various building
    construction work
  • There are numerous types required according to
    the specific type of work being done, many
    activities are also controlled by approved Codes
    of Practice.
  • The following is an overview of common
    requirements, always check with the industry
    association or appropriate authority to determine
    what you need to carry out your work.

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6.1 Office of Consumer Business Affairs,
Business Occupational Services
  • Telephone
  • Builders 8204 9644
  • Plumbers, Gas Fitters Electricians 8204
    9696
  • (Building Registration, Building Work
    Supervisors Registration, Plumbing, Gasfitting,
    Electrical Contractors License and/or
    registrations)

6.2 SafeWork SA Inspectorate
Telephone SafeWork SA Asbestos 8303 0405
Certification 8303 0481 Dangerous Goods 8303
0420 Certificate of Competencies
in Scaffolding Dogging Rigging Crane Operation
Hoist Operation Pressure Equipment Load Shifting
Equipment Bulldozer, Skid Steer, Front End
Loader, Forklift, Excavator, Drag Line Also
license to carry out- Asbestos removal work and
asbestos work.
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6.3 Environment Protection Agency (EPA)
  • Telephone 8204 2000
  • License to produce, store, and transport
    prescribed waste
  • Ozone accreditation assessment
  • Exemption to carry on a prohibited activity
  • Earth work Drainage
  • Dredging

6.4 Local Councils
Permits obtained from the local council where the
site is situated when work is over or under
council streets, footpaths or reserves. e.g. lay
underground cables and services, connect storm
water drainage, erect hoardings or barriers and
create and obstruction to a public place.
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6.5 Transport SA
  • Telephone 8348 9550
  • Over dimensional (Over Mass vehicle Permit )
  • Traffic and Road Engineering Restrictions/Modifica
    tions
  • Permit to work on or near roads (TSA)

6.6 Other Permits
Explosive powered tools operators ticket Permit
to enter confined spaces Hot work permit Permit
to use plant on suspended floors Scaffold permits
and tags.
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Section 7 Accident Incident Reporting.
  • Brief
  • The term Work Related Injury is defined in
    section 4 OHSW 1986, an injury may be
    considered as work related if it occurs at work
    or arises from a work practice or the conditions
    in a workplace.
  • Work related injuries include the recurrence,
    aggravation or exacerbation of previous work
    related injuries.
  • An accident is an unplanned occurrence or
    incident that causes or contributes to personal
    injury or damage to property
  • Under section 34(1) OHSW Act 1986 and Division
    6.6 of the OHSW Regs 1995, you must report and
    incident immediately, no matter ho minor.
  • This includes near misses as well as accidents
    resulting in injury or damage.
  • Employers are also required to keep records of
    injuries OHSW Regs 1995 Section 1.3.7
    (Council OHSW Policy 6.12 )

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7.1 Reporting Injuries.
  • When an accident occurs on site, the site
    supervisor, safety rep or employers rep must be
    notified immediately.
  • If the accident is of a serious nature it must
    also be reported to SafeWork SA as soon as
    practicable.
  • This includes
  • Any death
  • Any injury that as acute symptoms such as any
    exposure to a substance at work.
  • Any injury that requires treatment as an
    inpatient in a hospital.
  • Less serious injuries are not reported (SafeWork
    SA) except if it is a dangerous occurrence.
  • It is the responsibility of the Employer to
    ensure that an accident report is completed and
    forwarded details to relevant authorities.
  • ( Council OHSW Policy 6.12 )

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7.2 Dangerous Occurrences
  • A dangerous occurrence is any incident or event
    which arises from operations carried out at a
    work place and which causes an immediate and
    significant risk to a person.
  • A person does not have to be injured, it is the
    risk that is important
  • There are specific dangerous occurrences that
    must be reported to SafeWork SA.
  • The collapse, overturning or failure of load
    bearing scaffolding, lift, crane, hoist or mine
    winding equipment
  • Damage to or malfunction of any other major plant
  • The collapse or failure of an excavation more
    than 1.5m deep (including any shoring )
  • The collapse or partial collapse of building or
    structure
  • The collapse of the floor, wall, ceiling of a
    building bearing used as a work place.

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7.2 Dangerous Occurrences cont
  • An uncontrolled explosion, fire, escape of gas.
    Hazardous substance.
  • An electrical short circuit, malfunction or
    explosion
  • Breathing apparatus malfunctioning to the extent
    that the users health is in danger.
  • Any other unintended or uncontrolled incident or
    event arising from operations carried out at a
    workplace.
  • Any of these dangerous occurrence s must be
    reported to SafeWork SA Inspectorate, and written
    on the Notification of Dangerous Occurrence form
    within 24 hours SafeWork SA must be notified by
    phone as soon as the occurrence has happened.
  • (Council OHSW Policy 6.12)

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7.3 Workers Compensation
  • All workers have the right to claim Workers
    Compensation if they are injured at work. If you
    intend to make a claim for medical expenses or
    lost wages you must
  • Complete the Workcover Claim for Compensation
    Form (as soon as possible after the accident.)
  • Attach a medical certificate and any notice of
    expense occurred as a result of the accident
  • Keep a copy of the form (blue copy) and other
    documents
  • When preparing to return to work from a work
    related injury or illness, you must obtain a
    medical clearance or certificate from your
    Doctor.
  • Your Council Claims Officer is Chris Birch and
    Council Rehabilitation Officer is Warren Couzens
    8580 3000. for further information you can speak
    with your immediate supervisor. ( Council
    OHSW Policy 6.2 )

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7.4 First Aid
  • Under section 19(1) (B) of the OHSW Act, OHSW
    first aid facilities are described that must be
    provided by your employer.
  • Your employer provides first aid kits on site, in
    vehicles, at offices, depots, these kits are
    maintained to the Code of Practice for First Aid
    in the Workplace.
  • All items used from a first aid kit resulting
    from an incident at work, must be reported in the
    notebook provided in the kit.
  • Ensure that you make yourself aware where your
    workplace first aid kit is located and who to
    contact, when first aid is needed. ( Council
    OHSW Policy 6.14 )

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Section 8 Site Emergency Evacuation
  • Brief
  • While it should be remembered that all sites are
    different by way of location, type of project,
    number of workers, equipment used and so on, the
    existence of an emergency plan covering such
    things as excavation and fire prevention must be
    common to all sites.
  • An emergency plan should be part of the overall
    work plan/method.
  • As in a work plan, the emergency plan must be
    assed in consultation with both the
    employer/employees or their representatives.
    (Council OHSW Policy 6.6)

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8.1 Emergency Management Evacuation Procedures
  • In all work locations arrangements shall be made
    in consultation with site safety reps to ensure
  • An appropriate procedure exists for the
    protection of such personnel in the event of fire
    or other emergency occurring in the workplace or
    site.
  • Key personnel among the workers are nominated and
    trained to take control during and emergency
    procedure.
  • All persons are instructed in the workplace
    emergency procedure, and conduct appropriate
    practices exercises as often as required to
    ensure all persons are familiar with the
    procedure. (Council OHSW Policy 6.6.)

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8.2 Emergency Plan
  • An appropriate procedure means a predetermined
    plan of action for dealing with emergency
    procedures
  • An emergency plan should provide for
  • An effective system for alerting emergency
    personnel and activating emergency procedures
  • An immediate response aimed at eliminating or
    early containment of a threat
  • A properly located decision-making control group
  • A reliable fail-safe communications system
  • A simple, effective and generally accepted
    evacuation procedure
  • Set-up and inform all people on site of a safety
    assembly point
  • Display in a prominent position local emergency
    telephone contacts
  • (Council OHSW Policy/Procedure 6.6 )

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8.3 Responsibility
  • Overall compliance with the emergency plan and
    procedures is the responsibility of the employer
    or their representative who is in control of the
    workplace.
  • This means regular audits, tests of procedures,
    training and reviewing, updating all procedures
    based on current information.
  • (Council OHSW Policy 6.1 )

8.4 Possible Emergencies
  • The most likely emergency that may occur on a
    work site include, but are not limited to
  • Fire and smoke
  • All combustible materials
  • Toxic and /or flammable vapours emission
  • Vehicle or Plant Accident
  • Structural Collapse
  • Bomb or other threat
  • Chemical or hazardous substance spill

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8.5 In an Emergency
  • Keep calm
  • Raise the alarm
  • Obtain help (inform emergency services if
    required)
  • Where the emergency is (street, suburb state)
  • What has happened
  • Who is calling, and
  • Do not hang up without receiving instructions on
    how to proceed.
  • If a person is injured do not move them unless
    they are in further danger if you do not.
  • Remember, only provide assistance within your
    capabilities as set out in section 7 Accident
    Reporting
  • Do not place yourself in danger to become another
    casualty/victim.

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8.6 Fire Prevention
  • Under section 2.6.3 OHSW Regs. 1995, appropriate
    fire fighting facilities and where necessary
    fire-protection, must be available.
  • Portable fire extinguishers must be provided and
    installed at a workplace in accordance with AS/NZ
    Standard 2444 Portable Fire Extinguishers
    Selection Location.
  • Fire prevention in the Workplace can be assisted
  • By accumulated waste materials being removed
    regularly
  • Having flammable materials kept or handled in a
    safe manner to minimise the risk of fire
  • By the use of appropriate warning signs
  • And correct storage of any flammables
    materials/containers.
  • (Council OHSW Policies 6.6, 6.11, )

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8.7 Fire Fighting Equipment Selection.
  • Water Fire Extinguisher
  • Designed to be used where the main hazard is
    wood, paper, textiles and rubbish (not suitable
    for electrical or flammable liquid fires)
  • Carbon Dioxide Extinguisher
  • Works by reducing the concentration of oxygen in
    the air to the level of combustion can no longer
    occur. (can be used on small flammable liquid
    fire e.g. petrol, paint, solvents )
  • Foam Fire Extinguishers
  • Designed to be used on A B flammable liquids
    such as petrol, paints solvents ( not suitable
    for electrical fires )
  • Dry Chemical Fire Extinguishers
  • This extinguisher is available in a variety of
    powders, to cover a wide ranges risk the
    extinguishing agent are safe, non-toxic and
    non-conductive

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8.7 Fire Fighting Equipment Selection. Cont
  • Fire Hose Reels and Mains
  • Where a building on completion requires fire
    mains and /or fire hose reels to be installed
    pursuant to the Building Code of Australia, it is
    recommended that these facilities be available
    for fire fighting purposes.
  • Fire Blankets
  • Ideal for stove top fires and are easy to use,
    cooking oils fire are the most common cause of
    fires in kitchens
  • B.C.F. Extinguisher
  • THIS TYPE OF EXTINGUISHER IS NOW ILLEGAL

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