Assessment: The Heart of Transition Sue Sawyer, Transition Alliance Vicki Shadd, Glenn COE www.catransitionalliance.org - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Assessment: The Heart of Transition Sue Sawyer, Transition Alliance Vicki Shadd, Glenn COE www.catransitionalliance.org


1
Assessment The Heart of TransitionSue
Sawyer, Transition AllianceVicki Shadd, Glenn
COEwww.catransitionalliance.org
2
Welcome
  • Audience
  • Roles
  • Expectations
  • Transition means _______________________.

3
Goals
  • Explore a practical approach to transition
  • Transition Assessment Mandate
  • Identify strategies to assess transition needs
  • Explore evidenced based best practices
  • Strategies to integrate assessment information
    into the IEP
  • Identify tools and resources
  • Q A

4
Transition The Goal
  • Prepare our Youth to transition from high school
    prepared for their Adult Roles . . .
  • Roles
  • Worker
  • Responsible Family Member
  • Productive, Contributing Citizen
  • Life-Long Learner
  • . . . and to Function in Life Settings
  • Work, Home, Community, Classroom

5
Transition Planning begins with Student Choices
When do we start to help them dream about their
future?
Hope! Confidence! Resources!
6
Why Transition Planning Is Critical
  • Special Education students are twice as likely as
    their peers to drop out of high school.
  • The adjudication rate for youth with disabilities
    is four times higher than for youth without
    disabilities.
  • Young adults with disabilities face much higher
    adult unemployment rates than their peers. They
    are three times more likely to live in poverty.
  • Less than 8 of the students with learning
    disabilities go on to college after high school.
  • Source National Longitudinal Study, 2010

7
The Value of Transition Assessment
  • Meets the mandate of IDEA
  • AND, More importantly to the student
  • Validates readiness / needs to assume adult
    roles.
  • Drives the IEP at the high school level.
  • Makes the IEP make sense to students, parents.
  • Validates the need to complete the course of
    study.
  • Has the potential to instills a sense of
    confidence
  • Motivates student engagement.
  • Increases likelihood of positive outcomes.
  • Transition is not just a special education
    challenge.

8
Pathways to Prosperity Study Harvard
University, 2011
  • Students should be prepared for postsecondary
    options that could lead to a bright future,-but
    not necessarily a four-year degree.
  • Job market realities and college-completion
    patterns demand schools pay more attention to a
    large swath of students who graduate from high
    school, but might not earn a four year degree.
  • Two thirds of the jobs created in the U. S. will
    require postsecondary education, including
    occupational certificates and Associate degrees.
  • 56 of students who enroll in four year colleges
    earn a bachelors by their mid 20s.
  • The average student loan debt incurred for a four
    year degree is 24,000.
  • But Dont Lower Standards for All

9
National Core Academic StandardsReadiness for
College and Careers
  • Replaces No Child Left Behind
  • Increase rigor of courses
  • AND
  • Identify and supply academic interventions that
  • help kids access the curriculum.
  • Students need to prepare for college and careers.
    - Academic skills, knowledge, dispositions are
    the same for school and work.

10
Application to Students with Disabilities
  • How the common core standards are taught and the
    inclusion of supports and accommodations are
    critical for the success of students with
    disabilities who cannot benefit from general
    education.
  • Supports include
  • Support to meet their unique needs and enable
    their access to general education.
  • IEP includes annual goals aligned with and
    chosen to facilitate their attainment of grade
    level academic standards.
  • Teachers and support personnel who are trained.
  • Instructional Supports for learning, based on the
    principles of Universal Design Instructional
    Accommodations Technology
  • There is work to build accommodations into
    testing.

11
Changing Dynamics IDEA / ESEAIndividuals with
Disabilities Education ActElementary and
Secondary Education Act
  • Shifting Focus from Access to Outcomes
  • Increased focus on Transition for ALL
  • Collaboration with General Education
  • Response to Intervention (RtI)
  • Using Data
  • Universal Design
  • Technology

12
The World Is Changing-Rapidly
  • Globalization- New competitors
  • Emulate US-Building prosperous middle class
  • Technological advances
  • Computer to PDA
  • Demographics US population is aging
  • Economic implications
  • Immigration
  • Changing Values and Attitudes
  • Source Preparing Students for Their Future,
    Willard Daggett, Ed.D

13
21st Century Implications-By 2020
  • 36 of jobs will require Some College
  • 39 will require a college degree
  • Skills Identified as Critical for Success
  • Professionalism, Teamwork, Communication
  • Ability to Learn
  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Flexibility and Entrepreneurial Skills
  • Skills are essential to compete in the job market
  • Source 2008-12 CA State CTE Plan

    21st Century
    Skills

14
A challenging time to develop goals
  • The careers current students will enter are
    moving targets. Many existing careers are
    becoming obsolete others are emerging many of
    their jobs dont exist yet.
  • Current Headlines
  • Ranks of jobless grow USA Today
  • Auto Industry may see labor shortage. New
    hires need different skills set different than
    predecessors USA Today
  • Recession Proof Careers Tough to Predict USA
    Today
  • Cost of Education Continues to increase SacBee
  • Family struggles with Dads Unemployment AP
  • Unemployment Rate 17.7 Record Searchlight
  • Free Lancers Create jobs for themselves SacBee
  • HP to cut 9.000 jobs in its computing center
    SacBee
  • Hot Job Now Cloud Developer, RN, Business
    Intelligence Analyst, Manufacturing Quality
    Engineer, Search Engine Strategist

15
Are our students entering the workplace with the
education and skills they need?
  • Ability to advocate for themselves
  • Real World Application of Academic Skills
  • Career Decision-Making Skills
  • Job Seeking Skills Contact, Application,
    Interview
  • Job Retention Skills / Soft Skills
  • Technical Job Specific Skills
  • Functional Independent Living Skills
  • Are there other skills sets to add to this list?
  • Are the current offerings of courses and pathways
    meeting current and emerging economic and
    workforce needs?

16
IDEA Transition Mandate
  • The term transition services means a
    coordinated set of activities for a child with a
    disability that
  • Is designed to be within a results-oriented
    process, that is focused on improving the
    academic and functional achievement of the child
    with a disability to facilitate the childs
    movement from school to post-school activities,
  • including postsecondary education, vocational
    education, integrated employment (including
    supported employment) continuing and adult
    education, adult services, independent living, or
    community participation
  • Is based on the individual childs needs, taking
    into account the childs strengths, preferences,
    and interests and
  • Includes instruction, related services, community
    experiences, the development of employment and
    other post-school adult living objectives, and,
    if appropriate, acquisition of daily living
    skills and functional vocational evaluation.

17
Lets look at the mandatesTo Be Legal the IEP
Must Include
  • Employment
  • Competitive, Supported, Entrepreneurial
  • Part Time, Full Time
  • Community Experience Volunteer,
  • Education / Training Post secondary Learning
  • Formal Education College/University
  • Occupation specific Occupational Certification,
    Technical Training, Apprenticeship, on the job
    training, Adult Ed. Including On Line course
    offerings
  • Non traditional Community Based Experiences, OJT
  • Independent Living (if appropriate)
  • Living independently or in supported living
  • Living skills, community access,

18
Postsecondary goal formula After high school I
will _________________ ___________________
__ Behavior
where/how Transition is a process, not an IEP
19
More Mandates in the IEP
  • Annual IEP goals that reasonably help students
    to make progress toward achieving transition goal
  • Transition Services that focus on improving the
    academic and functional achievement to facilitate
    movement from high school to post-school.
  • Instruction
  • Related services
  • Community Experience

20
More of the Mandate
  • Based on Youths strengths, preferences and
    interests. Role of Assessment
  • Includes instruction, related services, community
    experience, development of employment and other
    post-school living objectives.
  • Mandates the development of a plan that
    summarizes skills, strengths, transition
    readiness, needs.

21
May include Independent Living
  • Daily Living / Home living skills
  • Household and Money Management
  • Transportation
  • Laws and Politics
  • Personal Safety
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • Self Advocacy
  • Reference Independent Living Postsecondary Goal
    Decision Assistance Form

22
And More Mandates
  • List transition services in the IEP that will
    reasonably enable the student to meet his/her
    postsecondary goals.
  • Include courses of study that will reasonably
    enable the student to meet his or her
    postsecondary goals.
  • Annual IEP goals relate to the student transition
    service needs.
  • Invite the student to the IEP where transition is
    discussed.
  • Evidence that reps. of any participating agencies
    were invited to the meeting.
  • Reference the document Transition in the IEP,
    the Mandate

23
Secondary Transition Requirements Indicator 13 IEP Mandates
1. Is there an appropriate measurable post-secondary goal or goals that covers education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living?
2. Is (are) the post-secondary goal(s) updated annually?
3. Is there evidence that the measurable post-secondary goal(s) were based on age appropriate transition assessment?
4. Are there transition services in the IEP that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her post-secondary goal(s)?
5. Do the transition services include courses of study that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her post-secondary goal(s)?
6. Is (are) there annual IEP goal(s) related to the students transition services needs?
7. Is there evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services were discussed?
8. If appropriate, is there evidence that a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority?
24
Predictors are activities, services that
demonstrate correlation with outcomes M
represents higher potential than P based on
current research.
25
What do We AssessMandate IEP must be based on
Age Appropriate AssessmentsCareer Assessments
  • Interests
  • Aptitude
  • Personality
  • Learning Preferences and Styles/Accommodations
  • Employment Literacy Skills
  • Talents
  • Work Values / Preferences
  • Experience
  • Physical Factors
  • Can be formal (standardized, commercial) or
    informal.

26
Evaluating Transition Needs
  • Confidence
  • High School, Post-Secondary Education, Training
    Goals
  • Transportation
  • Living Arrangements
  • Personal Management
  • Leisure/Recreation
  • Health / Medical
  • Income / Resources
  • Developmental Assets
  • Support System
  • Eligibility for services
  • Resources

These factors indicate agency involvement,
community experiences, related services.
27
A Challenging time to address transition
The Time Factor Many students and teachers who
focus on preparing for graduation and earning a
high school diploma struggle to address
transition because of the limited time available.
Students who are self directed can be encouraged
to take web-based career assessments (surveys,
self appraisals, and interest surveys. These
need to be followed up with reflection and
transition interviews to document goals. Some
schools utilize computerized information systems.
Others rely on public, free systems. Again,
reflection is critical. There is an array of
career resources at www.californiacareers.info.
28
The Time Factor
  • Many students and teachers who focus on preparing
    for graduation and earning a high school diploma
    struggle to address transition because of the
    limited time available. Students who are self
    directed can be encouraged to take web-based
    career assessments (surveys, self appraisals, and
    interest surveys. These need to be followed up
    with reflection and transition interviews to
    document goals. Some schools utilize
    computerized information systems. Others rely on
    public, free systems. Again, reflection is
    critical. There is an array of career resources
    at www.californiacareers.info.
  • School Mapping Where at your school site/within
    your district do students receive information
    that prepares them for life after high school?
  • Counselors, Career-Technical Education,
    English, Social Science
  • Senior Projects, ____________________,
    __________________________

29
Influences on Youth Decisions
  • Parents
  • Teachers
  • Family Members / Friends
  • Peers
  • Counselor
  • Media

30
Recognize the Role of the Family
  • Influence on goals, plans for the future.
  • Advocate
  • Life Coach
  • Support System after high school
  • Facing Transition
  • Changing roles / Adult children
  • Providing support to navigate transition systems.

31
Lets Look at Assessment Strategies
  • Long term process beginning in middle school.
  • Documents student growth, change, maturity
  • Involves educators, parents, community, business
  • Need to determine what, why, how to assess
  • Include assistive technology, universal design,
    accommodations

32
How Do Youth Make Choices Today?
  • The Logical Approach
  • Choose a career, find out what you have to learn
    (and major in) to get there.
  • Mystical Approach
  • Take general ed courses and wait for a white
    light to illuminate your career choice.
  • Cloning Approach
  • Follow the path of a teacher, friend or relative
  • Favorite Course Approach
  • Make a choices based on classes you enjoy or
    avoid
  • Marketable Approach
  • What options will make the most money.
  • Does the career guidance system we use address
    these choices?
  • Does it equip students to make self directed
    plans for their future?

33
  • Career Assessments answer the question
  • What career is of interest?
  • Should include assessment and experience
  • Must be age and grade appropriate.

Barriers with Decision-making Information
Awareness of choices, definitions,
vocabulary Experience If I havent done it, I
probably wont like it! Social Influences
Parents, Peers, Perceptions Decision making
style Confidence Effort
34
How Can We Help Youth Define their Goals and
Dreams?
  • Focus on their choice involvement
  • Encourage youth to actively explore options
    through career exploration, research, experiences
    in youth organizations/service-learning
  • Encourage youth to take classes related to goals
  • Encourage participation in activities in school
    in the community.
  • Focus youth on their attributes strengths.

35
The Value of a Career Assessment and Guidance
Helps students develop insights
My Personality What are my traits?
My Interests What do I like to Do?
My Preferences Where do I want to work?
My Talents and Skills What am I good at?
What careers match my interests, preferences,
abilities?
My Learning Style How do I learn the best?
Who is assessed? The Student!
36
Assessment Strategies
  • Three essential elements to assessment
  • Expressed- Interview / Question
  • Tested- Formal / Informal
  • Demonstrated Observation / Validation
  • Formal Standardized, One Time, Norm referenced
    (Academic, Achievement, Cognitive, Aptitude
    testing), limited to evaluators
  • Informal Student centered, on-going, can be
    integrated into a curriculum (rubrics,
    checklists, portfolios, observations, work
    samples, situational, rating scales, interviews,
    work skills (including soft skills), learning
    styles, personality, preferences, can be
    completed by students, parents, employers,
    teacher input)

37
Differences
  • Formal Assessment
  • Informal Assessment
  • Standardized (multiple choice)
  • Given annually-one shot
  • Norm referenced
  • Narrow measurement of skill
  • Comparison to others
  • Requires short term memory
  • Produces anxiety
  • Not a valid predictor of performance.
  • Non standardized (e.g. portfolio developed over
    time)
  • Ongoing, cumulative
  • Variety of settings
  • Open ended, multiple options
  • Student centered
  • Student driven-compare self goals
  • Measures real world application
  • Formative, summative measures

Source VECAP Vocational Evaluation and Career
Assessment Professionals Webinar
38
Role of Assessment in IEP
  • Assessment data is used to develop transition
    goals and activities in the IEP.
  • Value assessment data that is provided by
    student, family and external partner agencies.
  • Assessment methods should take into consideration
    individual characteristics, including cultural,
    linguistic differences.
  • Consider need for assistive technology or
    accommodations that allow students to demonstrate
    abilities and potential.

39
Integrate Transition Assessment into IEP
Assessment Information
Postsecondary Goals Postsecondary Goals Postsecondary Goals
Education/Training Employment Independent Living
Annual goals
Community Connections
40
Choosing an Assessment Tool
  • Is it easy for the youth to use? Can they relate
    to the questions? Is it appropriate for diverse
    disability groups?
  • Is it appropriate for the age and grade? Can
    youth relate to language, questions?
  • Does it avoid stereotyping career choices?
  • Is it easy to read and understand? Does it
    assess interests and aptitudes or reading skills?
  • Does it provide immediate feedback?
  • Does it lead to next steps? Does it provide
    direction to research, analysis, reflection, and
    planning?
  • Does it broaden the options youth are
    considering? Many youth with disabilities have
    one or two stated interests. Youth with
    disabilities frequently underestimate their
    potential. Assessments should help them see a
    wider array of options to consider.
  • Finally, followed up with reflection. Students
    need to consider and validate the results and
    gain personal insight that leads to exploration
    and planning.
  •  

41
Transition Assessments
Answers the Question What are your life plans
after high school and how can we help you
achieve your goals and dreams?
  • Focus includes
  • Post-school Employment, Education, Adult Living
  • Personal Social skills
  • Resources and Support Systems
  • Identify connections to next environments,
    agencies, resources
  • Self Advocacy Skills
  • Career Development

Includes teachers, family/support system, Agency
reps.
42
The Youth Focused Transition Cycle
43
Value of Work-based Experiences
44
Middle School Expectation
  • Develop self awareness
  • Become aware of work
  • Begin to plan ahead
  • Begin to match career ideas to self
  • Develop soft skills need for success in the
    workplace and the classroom
  • Assessment Strategies
  • Surveys, Pictoral Reviews, Rubrics, Mind Maps
  • Multiple Intelligences, Learning Styles,
  • Websites http//www.collegecareerlifeplanning.co
    m

45
High School Grades 9-10 Expectations
  • Refine interests-define course of study
  • See connections between classes and interests
  • Set tentative career goals
  • Explore postsecondary options for
    education/training
  • Develop essential skills
  • Assessment Strategies
  • Structured Interview, Portfolio, Self
    Determination Scale, Worksite evaluations, Self
    Advocacy skills,

46
Some Key Resources
  • Interest surveys using the Holland Code
  • ONET Job Descriptors
  • Multiple Intelligences
  • Core Academic Standards
  • CA Pathways
  • Casey Life Skills
  • Pennsylvania Transition Toolkit

47
Foundation of all Interest Assessments The
Holland Code
48
Multiple Intelligences A key to aptitude,
interests
49
Lets Explore Assessment Tools
  • ONET
  • My Next Move
  • Pennsylvania Transition Toolkit
  • National Collaborative on Workforce
    Development-Youth
  • Resources Essential Skills Document
  • Tools at shastacareerconnections.net

50
(No Transcript)
51
I wonder
  • Is it reasonable to expect students to have
    developed an actionable plan for their future by
    age 18?
  • Are we focusing on
  • A System to System Transition or
  • Helping Youth implement their life plan
  • Do we provide youth with the tools, information
    and resources to set goals and be prepared to act
    on their own plans?
  • This session will focus on the role assessments
    play in helping youth develop and act on their
    plan.

52
Resources
  • Transition Curriculum Tools
  • Talent Knows NO Limits
  • Real Game, CA
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Title: Assessment: The Heart of Transition Sue Sawyer, Transition Alliance Vicki Shadd, Glenn COE www.catransitionalliance.org


1
Assessment The Heart of TransitionSue
Sawyer, Transition AllianceVicki Shadd, Glenn
COEwww.catransitionalliance.org
2
Welcome
  • Audience
  • Roles
  • Expectations
  • Transition means _______________________.

3
Goals
  • Explore a practical approach to transition
  • Transition Assessment Mandate
  • Identify strategies to assess transition needs
  • Explore evidenced based best practices
  • Strategies to integrate assessment information
    into the IEP
  • Identify tools and resources
  • Q A

4
Transition The Goal
  • Prepare our Youth to transition from high school
    prepared for their Adult Roles . . .
  • Roles
  • Worker
  • Responsible Family Member
  • Productive, Contributing Citizen
  • Life-Long Learner
  • . . . and to Function in Life Settings
  • Work, Home, Community, Classroom

5
Transition Planning begins with Student Choices
When do we start to help them dream about their
future?
Hope! Confidence! Resources!
6
Why Transition Planning Is Critical
  • Special Education students are twice as likely as
    their peers to drop out of high school.
  • The adjudication rate for youth with disabilities
    is four times higher than for youth without
    disabilities.
  • Young adults with disabilities face much higher
    adult unemployment rates than their peers. They
    are three times more likely to live in poverty.
  • Less than 8 of the students with learning
    disabilities go on to college after high school.
  • Source National Longitudinal Study, 2010

7
The Value of Transition Assessment
  • Meets the mandate of IDEA
  • AND, More importantly to the student
  • Validates readiness / needs to assume adult
    roles.
  • Drives the IEP at the high school level.
  • Makes the IEP make sense to students, parents.
  • Validates the need to complete the course of
    study.
  • Has the potential to instills a sense of
    confidence
  • Motivates student engagement.
  • Increases likelihood of positive outcomes.
  • Transition is not just a special education
    challenge.

8
Pathways to Prosperity Study Harvard
University, 2011
  • Students should be prepared for postsecondary
    options that could lead to a bright future,-but
    not necessarily a four-year degree.
  • Job market realities and college-completion
    patterns demand schools pay more attention to a
    large swath of students who graduate from high
    school, but might not earn a four year degree.
  • Two thirds of the jobs created in the U. S. will
    require postsecondary education, including
    occupational certificates and Associate degrees.
  • 56 of students who enroll in four year colleges
    earn a bachelors by their mid 20s.
  • The average student loan debt incurred for a four
    year degree is 24,000.
  • But Dont Lower Standards for All

9
National Core Academic StandardsReadiness for
College and Careers
  • Replaces No Child Left Behind
  • Increase rigor of courses
  • AND
  • Identify and supply academic interventions that
  • help kids access the curriculum.
  • Students need to prepare for college and careers.
    - Academic skills, knowledge, dispositions are
    the same for school and work.

10
Application to Students with Disabilities
  • How the common core standards are taught and the
    inclusion of supports and accommodations are
    critical for the success of students with
    disabilities who cannot benefit from general
    education.
  • Supports include
  • Support to meet their unique needs and enable
    their access to general education.
  • IEP includes annual goals aligned with and
    chosen to facilitate their attainment of grade
    level academic standards.
  • Teachers and support personnel who are trained.
  • Instructional Supports for learning, based on the
    principles of Universal Design Instructional
    Accommodations Technology
  • There is work to build accommodations into
    testing.

11
Changing Dynamics IDEA / ESEAIndividuals with
Disabilities Education ActElementary and
Secondary Education Act
  • Shifting Focus from Access to Outcomes
  • Increased focus on Transition for ALL
  • Collaboration with General Education
  • Response to Intervention (RtI)
  • Using Data
  • Universal Design
  • Technology

12
The World Is Changing-Rapidly
  • Globalization- New competitors
  • Emulate US-Building prosperous middle class
  • Technological advances
  • Computer to PDA
  • Demographics US population is aging
  • Economic implications
  • Immigration
  • Changing Values and Attitudes
  • Source Preparing Students for Their Future,
    Willard Daggett, Ed.D

13
21st Century Implications-By 2020
  • 36 of jobs will require Some College
  • 39 will require a college degree
  • Skills Identified as Critical for Success
  • Professionalism, Teamwork, Communication
  • Ability to Learn
  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Flexibility and Entrepreneurial Skills
  • Skills are essential to compete in the job market
  • Source 2008-12 CA State CTE Plan

    21st Century
    Skills

14
A challenging time to develop goals
  • The careers current students will enter are
    moving targets. Many existing careers are
    becoming obsolete others are emerging many of
    their jobs dont exist yet.
  • Current Headlines
  • Ranks of jobless grow USA Today
  • Auto Industry may see labor shortage. New
    hires need different skills set different than
    predecessors USA Today
  • Recession Proof Careers Tough to Predict USA
    Today
  • Cost of Education Continues to increase SacBee
  • Family struggles with Dads Unemployment AP
  • Unemployment Rate 17.7 Record Searchlight
  • Free Lancers Create jobs for themselves SacBee
  • HP to cut 9.000 jobs in its computing center
    SacBee
  • Hot Job Now Cloud Developer, RN, Business
    Intelligence Analyst, Manufacturing Quality
    Engineer, Search Engine Strategist

15
Are our students entering the workplace with the
education and skills they need?
  • Ability to advocate for themselves
  • Real World Application of Academic Skills
  • Career Decision-Making Skills
  • Job Seeking Skills Contact, Application,
    Interview
  • Job Retention Skills / Soft Skills
  • Technical Job Specific Skills
  • Functional Independent Living Skills
  • Are there other skills sets to add to this list?
  • Are the current offerings of courses and pathways
    meeting current and emerging economic and
    workforce needs?

16
IDEA Transition Mandate
  • The term transition services means a
    coordinated set of activities for a child with a
    disability that
  • Is designed to be within a results-oriented
    process, that is focused on improving the
    academic and functional achievement of the child
    with a disability to facilitate the childs
    movement from school to post-school activities,
  • including postsecondary education, vocational
    education, integrated employment (including
    supported employment) continuing and adult
    education, adult services, independent living, or
    community participation
  • Is based on the individual childs needs, taking
    into account the childs strengths, preferences,
    and interests and
  • Includes instruction, related services, community
    experiences, the development of employment and
    other post-school adult living objectives, and,
    if appropriate, acquisition of daily living
    skills and functional vocational evaluation.

17
Lets look at the mandatesTo Be Legal the IEP
Must Include
  • Employment
  • Competitive, Supported, Entrepreneurial
  • Part Time, Full Time
  • Community Experience Volunteer,
  • Education / Training Post secondary Learning
  • Formal Education College/University
  • Occupation specific Occupational Certification,
    Technical Training, Apprenticeship, on the job
    training, Adult Ed. Including On Line course
    offerings
  • Non traditional Community Based Experiences, OJT
  • Independent Living (if appropriate)
  • Living independently or in supported living
  • Living skills, community access,

18
Postsecondary goal formula After high school I
will _________________ ___________________
__ Behavior
where/how Transition is a process, not an IEP
19
More Mandates in the IEP
  • Annual IEP goals that reasonably help students
    to make progress toward achieving transition goal
  • Transition Services that focus on improving the
    academic and functional achievement to facilitate
    movement from high school to post-school.
  • Instruction
  • Related services
  • Community Experience

20
More of the Mandate
  • Based on Youths strengths, preferences and
    interests. Role of Assessment
  • Includes instruction, related services, community
    experience, development of employment and other
    post-school living objectives.
  • Mandates the development of a plan that
    summarizes skills, strengths, transition
    readiness, needs.

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May include Independent Living
  • Daily Living / Home living skills
  • Household and Money Management
  • Transportation
  • Laws and Politics
  • Personal Safety
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • Self Advocacy
  • Reference Independent Living Postsecondary Goal
    Decision Assistance Form

22
And More Mandates
  • List transition services in the IEP that will
    reasonably enable the student to meet his/her
    postsecondary goals.
  • Include courses of study that will reasonably
    enable the student to meet his or her
    postsecondary goals.
  • Annual IEP goals relate to the student transition
    service needs.
  • Invite the student to the IEP where transition is
    discussed.
  • Evidence that reps. of any participating agencies
    were invited to the meeting.
  • Reference the document Transition in the IEP,
    the Mandate

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Secondary Transition Requirements Indicator 13 IEP Mandates
1. Is there an appropriate measurable post-secondary goal or goals that covers education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living?
2. Is (are) the post-secondary goal(s) updated annually?
3. Is there evidence that the measurable post-secondary goal(s) were based on age appropriate transition assessment?
4. Are there transition services in the IEP that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her post-secondary goal(s)?
5. Do the transition services include courses of study that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her post-secondary goal(s)?
6. Is (are) there annual IEP goal(s) related to the students transition services needs?
7. Is there evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services were discussed?
8. If appropriate, is there evidence that a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority?
24
Predictors are activities, services that
demonstrate correlation with outcomes M
represents higher potential than P based on
current research.
25
What do We AssessMandate IEP must be based on
Age Appropriate AssessmentsCareer Assessments
  • Interests
  • Aptitude
  • Personality
  • Learning Preferences and Styles/Accommodations
  • Employment Literacy Skills
  • Talents
  • Work Values / Preferences
  • Experience
  • Physical Factors
  • Can be formal (standardized, commercial) or
    informal.

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Evaluating Transition Needs
  • Confidence
  • High School, Post-Secondary Education, Training
    Goals
  • Transportation
  • Living Arrangements
  • Personal Management
  • Leisure/Recreation
  • Health / Medical
  • Income / Resources
  • Developmental Assets
  • Support System
  • Eligibility for services
  • Resources

These factors indicate agency involvement,
community experiences, related services.
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A Challenging time to address transition
The Time Factor Many students and teachers who
focus on preparing for graduation and earning a
high school diploma struggle to address
transition because of the limited time available.
Students who are self directed can be encouraged
to take web-based career assessments (surveys,
self appraisals, and interest surveys. These
need to be followed up with reflection and
transition interviews to document goals. Some
schools utilize computerized information systems.
Others rely on public, free systems. Again,
reflection is critical. There is an array of
career resources at www.californiacareers.info.
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The Time Factor
  • Many students and teachers who focus on preparing
    for graduation and earning a high school diploma
    struggle to address transition because of the
    limited time available. Students who are self
    directed can be encouraged to take web-based
    career assessments (surveys, self appraisals, and
    interest surveys. These need to be followed up
    with reflection and transition interviews to
    document goals. Some schools utilize
    computerized information systems. Others rely on
    public, free systems. Again, reflection is
    critical. There is an array of career resources
    at www.californiacareers.info.
  • School Mapping Where at your school site/within
    your district do students receive information
    that prepares them for life after high school?
  • Counselors, Career-Technical Education,
    English, Social Science
  • Senior Projects, ____________________,
    __________________________

29
Influences on Youth Decisions
  • Parents
  • Teachers
  • Family Members / Friends
  • Peers
  • Counselor
  • Media

30
Recognize the Role of the Family
  • Influence on goals, plans for the future.
  • Advocate
  • Life Coach
  • Support System after high school
  • Facing Transition
  • Changing roles / Adult children
  • Providing support to navigate transition systems.

31
Lets Look at Assessment Strategies
  • Long term process beginning in middle school.
  • Documents student growth, change, maturity
  • Involves educators, parents, community, business
  • Need to determine what, why, how to assess
  • Include assistive technology, universal design,
    accommodations

32
How Do Youth Make Choices Today?
  • The Logical Approach
  • Choose a career, find out what you have to learn
    (and major in) to get there.
  • Mystical Approach
  • Take general ed courses and wait for a white
    light to illuminate your career choice.
  • Cloning Approach
  • Follow the path of a teacher, friend or relative
  • Favorite Course Approach
  • Make a choices based on classes you enjoy or
    avoid
  • Marketable Approach
  • What options will make the most money.
  • Does the career guidance system we use address
    these choices?
  • Does it equip students to make self directed
    plans for their future?

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  • Career Assessments answer the question
  • What career is of interest?
  • Should include assessment and experience
  • Must be age and grade appropriate.

Barriers with Decision-making Information
Awareness of choices, definitions,
vocabulary Experience If I havent done it, I
probably wont like it! Social Influences
Parents, Peers, Perceptions Decision making
style Confidence Effort
34
How Can We Help Youth Define their Goals and
Dreams?
  • Focus on their choice involvement
  • Encourage youth to actively explore options
    through career exploration, research, experiences
    in youth organizations/service-learning
  • Encourage youth to take classes related to goals
  • Encourage participation in activities in school
    in the community.
  • Focus youth on their attributes strengths.

35
The Value of a Career Assessment and Guidance
Helps students develop insights
My Personality What are my traits?
My Interests What do I like to Do?
My Preferences Where do I want to work?
My Talents and Skills What am I good at?
What careers match my interests, preferences,
abilities?
My Learning Style How do I learn the best?
Who is assessed? The Student!
36
Assessment Strategies
  • Three essential elements to assessment
  • Expressed- Interview / Question
  • Tested- Formal / Informal
  • Demonstrated Observation / Validation
  • Formal Standardized, One Time, Norm referenced
    (Academic, Achievement, Cognitive, Aptitude
    testing), limited to evaluators
  • Informal Student centered, on-going, can be
    integrated into a curriculum (rubrics,
    checklists, portfolios, observations, work
    samples, situational, rating scales, interviews,
    work skills (including soft skills), learning
    styles, personality, preferences, can be
    completed by students, parents, employers,
    teacher input)

37
Differences
  • Formal Assessment
  • Informal Assessment
  • Standardized (multiple choice)
  • Given annually-one shot
  • Norm referenced
  • Narrow measurement of skill
  • Comparison to others
  • Requires short term memory
  • Produces anxiety
  • Not a valid predictor of performance.
  • Non standardized (e.g. portfolio developed over
    time)
  • Ongoing, cumulative
  • Variety of settings
  • Open ended, multiple options
  • Student centered
  • Student driven-compare self goals
  • Measures real world application
  • Formative, summative measures

Source VECAP Vocational Evaluation and Career
Assessment Professionals Webinar
38
Role of Assessment in IEP
  • Assessment data is used to develop transition
    goals and activities in the IEP.
  • Value assessment data that is provided by
    student, family and external partner agencies.
  • Assessment methods should take into consideration
    individual characteristics, including cultural,
    linguistic differences.
  • Consider need for assistive technology or
    accommodations that allow students to demonstrate
    abilities and potential.

39
Integrate Transition Assessment into IEP
Assessment Information
Postsecondary Goals Postsecondary Goals Postsecondary Goals
Education/Training Employment Independent Living
Annual goals
Community Connections
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Choosing an Assessment Tool
  • Is it easy for the youth to use? Can they relate
    to the questions? Is it appropriate for diverse
    disability groups?
  • Is it appropriate for the age and grade? Can
    youth relate to language, questions?
  • Does it avoid stereotyping career choices?
  • Is it easy to read and understand? Does it
    assess interests and aptitudes or reading skills?
  • Does it provide immediate feedback?
  • Does it lead to next steps? Does it provide
    direction to research, analysis, reflection, and
    planning?
  • Does it broaden the options youth are
    considering? Many youth with disabilities have
    one or two stated interests. Youth with
    disabilities frequently underestimate their
    potential. Assessments should help them see a
    wider array of options to consider.
  • Finally, followed up with reflection. Students
    need to consider and validate the results and
    gain personal insight that leads to exploration
    and planning.
  •  

41
Transition Assessments
Answers the Question What are your life plans
after high school and how can we help you
achieve your goals and dreams?
  • Focus includes
  • Post-school Employment, Education, Adult Living
  • Personal Social skills
  • Resources and Support Systems
  • Identify connections to next environments,
    agencies, resources
  • Self Advocacy Skills
  • Career Development

Includes teachers, family/support system, Agency
reps.
42
The Youth Focused Transition Cycle
43
Value of Work-based Experiences
44
Middle School Expectation
  • Develop self awareness
  • Become aware of work
  • Begin to plan ahead
  • Begin to match career ideas to self
  • Develop soft skills need for success in the
    workplace and the classroom
  • Assessment Strategies
  • Surveys, Pictoral Reviews, Rubrics, Mind Maps
  • Multiple Intelligences, Learning Styles,
  • Websites http//www.collegecareerlifeplanning.co
    m

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High School Grades 9-10 Expectations
  • Refine interests-define course of study
  • See connections between classes and interests
  • Set tentative career goals
  • Explore postsecondary options for
    education/training
  • Develop essential skills
  • Assessment Strategies
  • Structured Interview, Portfolio, Self
    Determination Scale, Worksite evaluations, Self
    Advocacy skills,

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Some Key Resources
  • Interest surveys using the Holland Code
  • ONET Job Descriptors
  • Multiple Intelligences
  • Core Academic Standards
  • CA Pathways
  • Casey Life Skills
  • Pennsylvania Transition Toolkit

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Foundation of all Interest Assessments The
Holland Code
48
Multiple Intelligences A key to aptitude,
interests
49
Lets Explore Assessment Tools
  • ONET
  • My Next Move
  • Pennsylvania Transition Toolkit
  • National Collaborative on Workforce
    Development-Youth
  • Resources Essential Skills Document
  • Tools at shastacareerconnections.net

50
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I wonder
  • Is it reasonable to expect students to have
    developed an actionable plan for their future by
    age 18?
  • Are we focusing on
  • A System to System Transition or
  • Helping Youth implement their life plan
  • Do we provide youth with the tools, information
    and resources to set goals and be prepared to act
    on their own plans?
  • This session will focus on the role assessments
    play in helping youth develop and act on their
    plan.

52
Resources
  • Transition Curriculum Tools
  • Talent Knows NO Limits
  • Real Game, CA
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