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The Six Research Based Guiding Principles Serving the Needs of English Learners in Preschool

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... Common Components Licensing & Health and Safety Staff training and teacher ... Accreditation Parent ... regarding cooperation ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The Six Research Based Guiding Principles Serving the Needs of English Learners in Preschool


1

Constructing Culturally Competent Quality
Rating and Improvement Systems A
Conversation Beyond Either/Or Resolving
Tensions in Systems Building Build Initiative
National Meeting Antonia Lopez National Council
of La Raza
2
Whats at Stake The achievement gap for Latino
children English proficient Latino children
are about three months behind White children, at
entry into Kindergarten, in their pre-reading
skills.  
3
The Prekindergarten gap is equivalent to 80 of
the gap observed in reading skills among Latino
children in fourth grade.
  • By 4th grade, 56 scored below basic on
    the reading
  • NAEP 2003 By 8th grade,
    44 score below basic on reading
  • NAEP 2003
  • By 2015, 75 of Latinos ages 16-25
  • will not have a high school diploma

4
QRIS Common Components
  • Licensing Health and Safety
  • Staff training and teacher qualifications
  • Environmental Rating Scales ERS
  • Early Learning Standards
  • Accreditation
  • Child-Staff Ratios and Group Size

5
Looking at Culture Language within QRIS
systems? Why now?
  • An opportunity for a fresh start to construct
    a high quality early childhood program for that
    resolves the cultural and linguistic issues that
    impact on the participation of children who are
    English language learners, and from multi-ethnic
    communities.

6
To do otherwise sets ups a Perfect Storm
The confluence of systems that contain
unresolved cultural and linguistic issues that
impact on the participation and access to high
quality programs for EL children and
multi-cultural communities.
Licensing Health and Safety
Early Learning Standards
Staff training and teacher qualifications
Parent Involvement
English Only Practices or policies
Child-staff ratios and Group Size
Accreditation
Environmental Rating Scales ERS
Ideologically Driven Curriculum
7
A Perfect Storm. Lets start by keeping all
the components in mind as we examine each
separately.
8
A Perfect Storm.
Environmental Rating System ERS
The solution we sought via ERS -- A proxy for
classroom quality The RAND Study New
questions posed about reliability of ERS as a
proxy for quality The BUILD SCAN Search for
quality indicators that point to issues of
culture language
9
A Perfect Storm
Licensing Health and Safety
  • Expand Diversity in Program Providers East Los
    Angeles Story
  • Outreach Language practices, centralized
    systems and venues
  • Recruitment English only policies, cultural
    competence of staff to facilitate essential
    requirements, fees, first aid CPR, zoning,
    financial business plans
  • Development impact of traditional orientation
    and hands off approaches
  • Retention culturally relevant technical
    assistance beyond the application stage,
    including compliance visits and resolution of
    citations small business practices, marketing
    and program resources, linkages to RRs,

10
A Perfect Storm
Staff training and teacher qualifications
  • Coursework relevant to diverse community and ECE
    settings
  • Tuition, textbook, transportation support,
    access to computers technology
  • Peer groups and cohorts
  • Bilingual, culturally competent college faculty
  • Alignment articulation among 2-year and 4 year
    schools
  • Advising beyond ECE, placement tests, academic
    tutoring
  • Non-traditional schedules and flexible course
    sequence

11
A Perfect Storm
Early Learning Standards for English Language
Learners
  • Must reflect the research base in brain
    development regarding
  • language development, cognitive development and
    identity formation.
  • Children can learn two languages at the same
    time, one language is enhanced by the other.
  • A childs home language is a crucial foundation
    for cognitive development
  • A learning environment that affirms a childs
    culture and language is essential healthy
    identify development.

12
A Perfect Storm
Ideologically Driven Curriculum
English-only myths based versus research based
Skills-based versus developmentally appropriate
practice Deficit view of family versus
strengths-based family values Eurocentric values
based versus multicultural competence Low
expectations for children, family participation,
community Cultural activities reduced to
artifacts, isolated events and festival songs
13
A Perfect Storm
Child-Staff Ratios and Group Size
Entry level application requirements (GED or US
HS diploma) Cost Process -- Evaluating out of
country transcripts, English only practice --
Isolation, marginalization, underutilization Gir
l Friday -- inadequate access to mentoring and
career coaching Lack of Financial Incentives --
bilingual skills and cultural competence
14
A Perfect Storm
  • The RAND Report
  • Changing views

Accreditation
Parent Involvement
15
A Perfect Storm. Financial Incentives float
all boats - avoid the SERRANO PRIEST
scenario.. Inequitable distribution of
financial support and incentives and systems that
do not incorporate quality indicators for
linguistic and cultural competence become the
vehicles for cultural and linguistic isolation of
children and families, result in language loss
and family disintegration and erect barriers to
long-term academic successsooner, rather than
later.
16
Why QRIS, why now? A fresh start
17
Now that were at this point in the conversation
Lets talk What do we hope to achieve by
using a quality rating system? What are barriers
in your state to changing the conversation to
include language and culture? Whos already
involved in this conversation and who else needs
to be at the table and how can you get them
there? Who are your cultural brokers, your
allies and how do you, get their support/bring
them in? What can be done in the next month to
start this conversation?
18
Keep the seas safe for all of our children,
their families, our communities and our country.

19
Sembrando Semillas
  • Six Research Based Guiding Principles

20
1. A childs home language is a crucial
foundation for cognitive development
  • Several decades of research indicate that a
    childs first language is the best key to
    literacy.
  • Knowledge, concepts, and skills established in
    the home language support and contribute to the
    development of the childs second language.
    (Durgunoglu, Nagy and Hancin-Bhatt, 1993
    Escamilla, 2000 Snow, Burns Griffin, 1999
    Tqabors, 1997 Tabors and Snow, 2001 Vgotsky,
    1985).

21
2. A learning environment that facilitates
social-emotional growth and affirms a childs
culture and language is essential for full
participation and healthy identify development.
  • respect and integrate the key role of a childs
    culture and language to her social-emotional and
    identity development.
  • support young children in bridging across and
    integrating home and school contexts.
  • Bowman, Burns, Donovan, 2000 bowman Stott,
    1994 Day Parlakian, 2003 Kauffman, 2002
    Luria, 1976 Rqaver, 2002 Phillips, 1995).

22
3. One language is enhanced by another
  • The early years are a unique window of
    opportunity for development of native-like
    fluency in two or more languages
  • Young children have the capacity to learn
    multiple languages simultaneously .
  • (Hakuta Garcia, 1989 NAEYC, 1995 Slavin
    Cheung, 2004 Tabors, 1997 Tabors Snow, 2001
    Thomas Collier, 2002).

23
4. Linguistic and cultural congruity build
strong home-school partnerships and support
parents as a childs first teacher.
  • drawing upon the knowledge, expertise and
    cultural capital of families as assets, the
    teacher is better able to understand the child,
    the context in which the child functions and the
    familys values and culture
  • the parents come to know the culture of the
    school.
  • home and classroom activities complement and
    reinforce each other.
  • builds parents confidence and capacity to
    effectively support their childrens
    social-emotional, physical and language/literacy
    development at home.

24
5. Assessments that are culturally and
lingistically appropriate are essential to ensure
the child has access to developmentall
appropriate and high quality early education.
(Genesee, Lindholm-Leary, Saunders Christian,
2004 McLaughlin, Blanchard Osani, 1995 NAEYC
NAECS/SDE, 2005 Raver Zigler, 2004
Shephard, Kagan Wurtz, 1998).
25
6. High quality, research-based professional
development is needed for teachers to meet the
needs of preschool age English Learners and their
families
  • What Teachers should know Selected
    recommendations for bilingual teachers and QRIS
    rating specialists
  • 1. Knowledge of the characteristics,
    components, benefits, and limitations of
    research-based program models of bilingual
    education (e.g., dual-language, one-way
    immersion, two-way immersion, transitional
    bilingual, maintenance, heritage language).
  • Excerpts from the CSET Bilingual Methodology
    Bilingual Culture Examinations, November 2007.

26
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 2. Understanding of theoretical foundations,
    practices, limitations, and effects of the
    deficit perspective of bilingual education (e.g.,
    viewing the primary language as an obstacle,
    limiting use of the primary language, promoting
    assimilation into the target culture).
  • 3. Understanding of the theoretical foundations,
    practices, limitations, and effects of enrichment
    perspective of bilingual education (e.g., viewing
    the primary language as a right and an asset,
    promoting the development of bilingualism and
    biculturalism, promoting acculturation into the
    target culture).

27
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 4. Understanding of the roles of code-switching
    and language mixing in the development of
    bilingualism and early biliteracy.
  • 5. Knowledge of developmental processes of
    bilingualism and biliteracy to select appropriate
    language use and usage (e.g., translation,
    language allocation model) when interacting with
    students at different developmental stages of
    bilingualism and biliteracy.
  • 6. Understanding of transferability of language
    and literacy skills between the primary and
    target languages, including ways in which
    language transfer can be affected by the level of
    compatibility between the primary language and
    English.

28
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 7. Understanding of concepts of intercultural
    communication, including cultural differences in
    patterns of nonverbal communication (e.g.,
    distance between speakers, eye contact), patterns
    of oral discourse (e.g., overlapping,
    turn-taking, volume of voice, use/role of silence
    forms of address, respect, greetings).
  • 8. Understanding of cultural influences (e.g.,
    different values regarding cooperation and
    competition, different expectations and
    preferences in teacher-child and child-child
    interaction, different attitudes toward
    conformity and individuality).

29
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 9. Knowledge of intercultural communication and
    interaction that is linguistically and culturally
    inclusive and responsive to provide literacy and
    content instruction (e.g., role-playing
    intercultural encounters, discussion of current
    events related to a variety of cultures,
    respecting childs primary language/dialect,
    using childs primary language and home culture
    to promote language and early literacy and
    content area learning).
  • 10. Knowledge of effective strategies to
    communicate assessment results to families and to
    provide guidance on ways in which families can
    support their childrens learning at home and at
    the early education center.

30
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 11. Knowledge of strategies to identify
    opportunities for families to contribute their
    funds of knowledge and expertise within the
    program and across the school community,
    including participation in a variety of program
    forums and organizations.
  • 12. Knowledge of language structures (e.g., word
    roots, prefixes, suffixes), forms (e.g.,
    registers), and functions (e.g., informing,
    describing, persuading) to develop and delivery
    effective language instruction in the primary and
    target languages.

31
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 13. Understanding of ways in which childs life
    experiences (e.g., immigrant or refugee
    experiences, out-of-school time experiences, role
    in family and with siblings and extended family)
    can be used to foster learning and early literacy
    in the primary and target languages.

32
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 14. Understanding of the beliefs and values of
    different groups, including indigenous groups
    that are members of the child/family population
    they serve are members of the community.
  • 15. Recognize how cultural and social traditions
    affect teaching and learning practices and
    expectations of the diverse families (e.g., oral
    tradition, rote learning, observation).

33
What Teachers Should Know Selected
recommendations for Knowledge, Skills and
Abilities for bilingual teachers and QRIS rating
specialists.
  • 17. Knowledge of strategies for interpreting the
    results of primary- and target-language
    assessments to plan, organize, modify, and
    individualize educational plan for an individual
    child as well as a group of children.
  • 18. Knowledge of strategies for reviewing and
    evaluating materials to identify potential areas
    of offense or bias (e.g., race, class, gender,
    religion, country of origin) and to ensure
    appropriate representation of linguistic and
    cultural diversity within and across language and
    cultural groups.
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