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Final Exam Grammar Review Everything in this Powerpoint is on the exam!

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Final Exam Grammar Review Everything in this Powerpoint is on the exam! Subject-Verb Subject: The noun that the sentence is about. The noun that is acting in the ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Final Exam Grammar Review Everything in this Powerpoint is on the exam!


1
Final Exam Grammar ReviewEverything in this
Powerpoint is on the exam!
2
Subject-Verb
Subject The noun that the sentence is about. The
noun that is acting in the sentence. Verb or
Simple Predicate The action that is happening in
the sentence. The cat jumped on the
couch. Jack and Jill ran up the hill. Van Gogh
is my favorite painter.
3
Verb Tense Agreement
Verb tense means using the right form of the
verb. The verb needs to match the tense of the
subject and the other verbs in the piece. We is
going to the mall afterschool. We are going to
the mall afterschool. We bought new jeans. We
are going to the mall afterschool. We will buy
new jeans.
4
Pronoun-Antecedent
A pronoun replaces another noun in a sentence.
The antecedent is the noun that is being
replaced. They need to match. Bob went to the
store to buy his groceries. Bob- Antecedent
His- Pronoun
5
His/Her v. Their
Even though people do it all the time, their
cannot replace his or her. Their is plural
(more than one). Each student should turn in
their project. WRONG! Each student should turn in
his or her project. RIGHT!
6
Comma- Introductory Phrase
Place a comma after an introductory phrase. This
is a group of words at the start of a sentence
that is outside the subject and predicate. It
can be removed without changing the main meaning
of the sentence. First, I went to the
store. The best movie in the world was playing.
Surprisingly the theater wasnt very busy. After
the movie I went to dinner. The best movie in
the world was playing. Surprisingly, the theater
wasnt very busy. After the movie, I went to
dinner. I went to dinner after the movie.
7
Comma- Appositive Phrase/Interrupter
Place commas around an appositive phrase or
interrupter. This is a group of words in the
middle of a sentence that is outside the subject
and predicate, but gives more information. It
can be removed without changing the main meaning
of the sentence. Frank, who is a dog, likes to
eat steak. Sally who is a vegetarian does not
like to eat steak. Steak of course comes from
dead cows. Sally is against hurting cows. Sally,
who is a vegetarian, does not like to eat steak.
Steak, of course, comes from dead cows. Sally is
against hurting cows.
8
Commas around names
Place commas around a name only if it is EXTRA
information. My husband, Kyle, likes pizza. (I
have one husband, so its extra.) My husband
Kyle likes pizza. (Apparently, I have multiple
husbands!) My friend, Kara, has 4 cats. (Sad, I
only have one friend.) My friend Kara has 4
cats. (Not extra - I have many friends- You need
to know which one Im talking about.)
9
Semi-colon- Two Independent Clauses
A semi-colon can be used to connect two related
independent clauses. These could stand as
sentences on their own. I like Girl Scout
cookies the best kind is Thin Mints. The
weather is getting really nice but it is raining
a lot. Im glad we dont live in Texas they are
having crazy flooding. The weather is getting
really nice, but it is raining a lot. Im glad we
dont live in Texas they are having crazy
flooding.
10
Semi-Colon- List with commas
Use a semi-colon to separate items in a list when
the items have commas in them. This eliminates
confusion. I have visited Boise, Idaho Los
Angeles, California and Nashville, Tennessee.
11
Colon
A colon is used to connect a list or example to
the end of an already complete sentence. What is
in front of the colon must be a complete sentence
first. We read many books in English 11 Hamlet,
Beowulf, and The Canterbury Tales. RIGHT! I
bought shoes, a skirt, and a shirt. WRONG!
12
Parallel Structure
Parallel structure means using the same pattern
of words throughout a sentence. Mary likes
hiking, swimming, and bicycling. PARALLEL! Mary
likes hiking, to swim, and bicycling. NOT
PARALLEL! I was asked to write my report
quickly, accurately, and in a detailed manner.
NOT PARALLEL!  I was asked to write my report
quickly, accurately, and thoroughly. PARALLEL!
13
Misplaced Modifier
A misplaced modifier is when a group of words
tell us more about something in the sentence, but
it is unclear. With no names, the teacher was
confused about the assignments. WRONG! The
teacher was confused about the assignment with no
names. RIGHT!
14
Titles
Put short stories, articles, and short poems in
quotes. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight The
Pardoners Tale Put whole works, books, movies
in italics or underline. Beowulf The Princess
Bride
15
Contractions
  • The apostrophe replaces the missing letters
  • Can not cant
  • Did not didnt
  • I am Im

16
Possession
  • Use an apostrophe and an s to signal possession.
  • The boys homework was easy.
  • The teachers desk is fancy.
  • Beccas Triscuits are not for sharing!
  • Chriss book is cool.

17
Plural Possession
  • Make the noun plural first
  • If you added an s already, just add the
    apostrophe
  • If there is no s, add apostrophe s.
  • The womens rights movement
  • The boys hockey team

18
Dont Use An Apostrophe
  • Never use an apostrophe with possessive pronouns
    his, hers, its, theirs, ours, yours, whose.
  • Never use one with a regular plural
  • I have many books.
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