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The Nexus Explored: A Generalised Model of Learning Styles

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The Nexus Explored: A Generalised Model of Learning Styles How Students Learn Damian Gordon, Gordon Bull e-Learning Research Group, School of Computing, – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The Nexus Explored: A Generalised Model of Learning Styles


1
The Nexus Explored A Generalised Model of
Learning Styles
How Students Learn
  • Damian Gordon, Gordon Bull
  • e-Learning Research Group,
  • School of Computing,
  • Dublin Institute of Technology,
  • Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland.

2
(No Transcript)
3
Universities
4
Behaviourism

5
Cognitivism

6
Constructivism

Lev Semenovich Vygotsky
John Dewey
7
POP QUIZ
8
POP QUIZ
  • 1. On average do students prefer to work alone or
    in groups?
  • a) in groups
  • b) alone
  • c) dunno

9
POP QUIZ
  • 1. On average do students prefer to work alone or
    in groups?
  • a) in groups 1
  • b) alone -1
  • c) dunno 0

10
POP QUIZ
  • 2. Is it better for students to work
    collaboratively or competitively?
  • a) collaboratively
  • b) competitively
  • c) Equally good for their learning

11
POP QUIZ
  • 2. Is it better for students to work
    collaboratively or competitively?
  • a) collaboratively 1
  • b) competitively -1
  • c) Equally good for their learning 0

12
POP QUIZ
  • 3. Do students learn better if you offer a small
    reward?
  • a) Yes
  • b) No
  • c) dunno

13
POP QUIZ
  • 3. Do students learn better if you offer a small
    reward?
  • a) Yes -1
  • b) No 1
  • c) dunno 0

14
POP QUIZ
  • 4. Which is better, detailed feedback 3 weeks
    after an assignment in handed up, or a result
    one week later?
  • a) Feedback
  • b) Percentage
  • c) dunno

15
POP QUIZ
  • 4. Which is better, detailed feedback 3 weeks
    after an assignment in handed up, or a result
    one week later?
  • a) Feedback -1
  • b) Percentage 1
  • c) dunno 0

16
POP QUIZ
  • 5. How soon after a lecture starts will a
    students attention tend to drift?
  • a) 10 mins
  • b) 20 mins
  • c) 40 mins

17
POP QUIZ
  • 5. How soon after a lecture starts will a
    students attention tend to drift?
  • a) 10 mins 1
  • b) 20 mins 0
  • c) 40 mins -1

18
Why Lecture ???

19
Reasons
  • 1. To Enthuse Students

20
Reasons
  • 1. To Enthuse Students
  • How? Put yourself in their shoes,
  • Consider, if youve taught the topic for years...
  • Consider, if new to you to do...

21
Reasons
  • 1. To Enthuse Students
  • How? Put yourself in their shoes,
  • Consider, if youve taught the topic for years...
  • Consider, if new to you to do...
  • 2. To give students the info they need

22
Reasons
  • 1. To Enthuse Students
  • How? Put yourself in their shoes,
  • Consider, if youve taught the topic for years...
  • Consider, if new to you to do...
  • 2. To give students the info they need
  • How? Handouts can give 10 times more material,
    but must mix info with other materials (Make sure
    handout has lots of free space)

23
Reasons
  • 3. To cover the syllabus

24
Reasons
  • 3. To cover the syllabus
  • How? In a meaningfully manner. Give the students
    time to reflect and revise. So stop teaching for
    the last 3 weeks and get students to reflect and
    revise.

25
Reasons
  • 3. To cover the syllabus
  • How? In a meaningfully manner. Give the students
    time to reflect and revise. So stop teaching for
    the last 3 weeks and get students to reflect and
    revise.
  • 4. Give the student group a sense of identity

26
Reasons
  • 3. To cover the syllabus
  • How? In a meaningfully manner. Give the students
    time to reflect and revise. So stop teaching for
    the last 3 weeks and get students to reflect and
    revise.
  • 4. Give the student group a sense of identity
  • How? Group work is vital

27
Reasons
  • 5. Because its cost-effective - large groups

28
Reasons
  • 5. Because its cost-effective - large groups
  • How? Instead of throwing out questions to
    students (as some may be intimidated) ask student
    to spend next 3 minutes writing down 3 most
    important ideas weve been talking about, and
    spend a minute comparing youve with your
    neighbourlook for 5 volunteers.
  • Rather than getting student to asks questions at
    end of class collect on slips of paper and answer
    at start of next class or on-line on discussion
    board.

29
Reasons
  • 6. To help map curriculum

30
Reasons
  • 6. To help map curriculum
  • How? Signpost the course. Show the students the
    syllabus, included learning outcomes. Number the
    topics instead of bullet pointing them

31
Reasons
  • 6. To help map curriculum
  • How? Signpost the course. Show the students the
    syllabus, included learning outcomes. Number the
    topics instead of bullet pointing them
  • 7. To see how the students are doing

32
Reasons
  • 6. To help map curriculum
  • How? Signpost the course. Show the students the
    syllabus, included learning outcomes. Number the
    topics instead of bullet pointing them
  • 7. To see how the students are doing
  • How? Look at their faces
  • How? Handout your slides, with first slide having
    questions about previous lecture - spend 5
    minutes of lecture getting student to answer.

33
Reasons
  • 8. To change student beliefs

34
Reasons
  • 8. To change student beliefs
  • How? By sharing your experience Expert views
    Existing Theories Other students ideas.
  • Make the students learning active, when students
    apply their ideas, it becomes their knowledge.

35
Reasons
  • 9. To help students learn

36
Reasons
  • 9. To help students learn
  • How? For a few minutes ask the students to
    reflect on HOW they are learning. Share with
    others their approaches, their triumphs and
    disasters.
  • How? Stop class for a few minutes and discuss
    their note-making techniques.
  • How? Ask student to write down 3 things they
    dont yet know about a topic and want to
    learnamalgamate lists and hand to lecturer

37
Reasons
  • 10. To help students figure out what the lecturer
    is going to ask in the exam

38
Reasons
  • 10. To help students figure out what the lecturer
    is going to ask in the exam
  • How? Students need to be more strategic about
    assessment, it is an intelligent response to
    their situation. But you just need to help them
    figure out your culture of assessment, not every
    little facet of it.

39
How can I improve my lectures?
  • Get a notebook per course.
  • Include attendance sheets, handouts, slides, etc.
  • After each lecture
  • Note down errors in slides and handouts
  • Write down key points of lecture
  • Tricky issues
  • Good examples

40
How can I improve my lectures?
  • Include questions after each lecture
  • What did I do best?
  • What should I avoid?
  • What surprised me?
  • What were the good student questions?
  • What couldnt the students answer?

41
What is Learning Style ?
  • the composite of characteristic cognitive,
    affective, and physiological factors that serve
    as relatively stable indicators of how a learner
    perceives, interacts with, and responds to the
    learning environment Keefe (1979)
  • a consistent pattern of behaviour within a range
    of individual variability (Cornet, 1983)
  • a student's consistent way of responding to and
    using stimuli in a learning environment (Claxton
    Ralston, 1978)
  • how individuals process information and prefer to
    learn (Garity, 1985)
  • the way individuals organise information and
    experiences (Laschinger Boss, 1984) and
  • an expression of psychological differentiation
    within characteristic modes of information
    processing (Witkin Goodenough, 1971, 1981).

42
Learning Styles Models
43
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44
Perception
45
Sensing
Perception
Intuiting
46
Judgement
Perception
47
Feeling
Thinking
Judgement
Perception
48
Gordon-Bull Learning Styles Model
  • Style a Structured Practical
  • Style ß Intrapersonal Discussion
  • Style ? Imaginative Holistic
  • Style d Logical Analytical

49
Whats the Added Value ?
50
Resistant Learners
  • (Like the Avoidant dimension in the
    Grasha-Riechmann Model)
  • 1. they may lack the ICT skills to interact
    effectively with e-Learning materials,
  • 2. they may lack the self-confidence to use ICTs
    effectively, or
  • 3. they may not wish to participate in the
    learning experience because they are apathetic,
    frustrated, unable, discouraged or disobedient.

51
What Else ?
Evolutionary Learning Style Models
52
New Work (1)
  • LEARNING STYLES RESEARCH

53
New Work (2)
  • 50 WAYS TO GIVE GREAT COMPUTING LECTURES

54
??? Questions ???
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