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Moving a Classroom-Based Course to an Online or Hybrid Learning Environment

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Moving a Classroom-Based Course to an Online or Hybrid Learning Environment. ... V. Learner Interaction . VI. ... A classroom teacher's guide (2nd ed.). – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Moving a Classroom-Based Course to an Online or Hybrid Learning Environment


1
Moving a Classroom-Based Course to an Online or
Hybrid Learning Environment
  • Debra Dunlap Runshe, Instructional Development
    Specialist
  • Indiana University Purdue University
    Indianapolis
  • University Information Technology Services -
    Learning Technologies

2
Session Goals
  • By the end of this session you will be able to
  • articulate the benefits of online or hybrid
    delivery methods.
  • identify tools for assessing whether a course
    fits comfortably into a face-to-face, online, or
    hybrid delivery mode.
  • describe best practices for developing and
    delivering an online or hybrid course.

3
Online Environments Defined
  • Web-enhanced courses face-to-face courses that
    utilize online resources
  • Hybrid courses (sometimes referred to as blended
    courses) courses that meet both face-to-face
    and online
  • Fully online courses courses that do not meet
    face-to-face, however, may occasionally meet
    synchronously

4
What Research Tells Us
  • Improved learning effectiveness
  • Increased access and convenience
  • Greater cost effectiveness

(Graham, 2006)
5
First Questions
6
Principles for Good Practice
  1. Encourages student-faculty contact
  2. Develops reciprocity and cooperation among
    students
  3. Uses active learning techniques
  4. Gives prompt feedback
  5. Emphasizes time on task
  6. Communicates high expectations
  7. Respects diverse talents and ways of learning

(Chickering Gamson, 1987)
7
Blooms Taxonomy
(Bloom, 1956)
8
The ADDIE Design Approach
9
Congruence and Course Design
Outcomes
Activities
Assessments
10
Integrated Course Design
(Fink, 2003)
11
Presenting Course Content
  • Presented in an organized fashion using modules,
    sections, chunking, etc.
  • Uses consistent formatting
  • Presented using a variety of modalities (e.g.,
    text, video, audio, images, diagrams, photos,
    hands-on interactive activities) to appeal to
    different learning styles
  • Incorporates images, photos, diagrams to enhance
    understanding
  • Current, accurate, appropriate for target
    audience, and error free

12
Rubrics to Assess Online Learning
  • Quality Matters Peer Course Review Rubric
  • Chico State Rubric for Online Instruction
  • I. Course Overview and Introduction
  • II. Learning Objectives (Competencies)
  • III. Assessment and Measurement
  • IV. Resources and Materials
  • V. Learner Interaction
  • VI. Course Technology
  • VII. Learner Support
  • VIII. Accessibility
  • I. Learner Support and Resource
  • II. Online Organization and Design
  • III. Instructional Design and Delivery
  • IV. Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning
  • V. Innovative Teaching with Technology
  • VI. Faculty Use of Student Feedback

13
Course Introduction
  • Creates the learning climate
  • student - content
  • student - faculty
  • student student
  • Familiarizes students with course site
  • Sets expectations
  • syllabus
  • workload

14
Building Community
15
Online Readiness
  • Readiness Index for Learning Online (RILO)
    developed by the Indiana University School of
    Nursing http//nursing.iupui.edu/students/rilo.sht
    ml
  • Student Online Readiness Tool (SORT) developed by
    the University System of Georgia
    http//www.alt.usg.edu/sort/

16
Course Navigation
  • Consider using screen shots or creating a short
    video with a screen capture software
    demonstrating how to navigate the site.
  • Build in a scavenger hunt.

17
Course Syllabus
  • Instructor contact information
  • General course information
  • Resources and materials
  • Learner support
  • Course expectations

Sample Online and Hybrid Course Syllabus
Template https//sites.google.com/a/email.vccs.ed
u/instructionaldesign/syllabus
18
Instructor Contact Information
  • Instructor name, office, telephone number and
    email address
  • Office hours (face-to-face and/or virtual)
  • Instructions on how to communicate with the
    instructor and other students (via phone, mail,
    coursemail, etc.)
  • Approximate expected timelines for instructor
    responses to student messages

19
General Course Information
  • Course title, course number, course section
  • Course description from university catalog
  • Prerequisite courses
  • Prerequisite content knowledge and technical
    skills
  • Course goals and objectives

20
Resources and Materials
  • Support the course outcomes and have sufficient
    breadth and depth
  • Presented in a format appropriate to the online
    environment and are easily understood
  • Purpose of the course elements (content,
    instructional methods, technologies, and course
    materials) is evident
  • Materials contain navigational details and
    instructions that are easy to understand

21
Learner Support
  • Instructions for handling technical problems
  • Contact information for technology assistance
  • Campus resources for tutoring, academic support,
    and counseling
  • Supplemental materials to help students be
    successful in course
  • Co-curricular activities and professional
    organizations relevant to course

22
Course Expectations
  • Content outline and course calendar that includes
    schedule of assignments such as readings, exams,
    papers, and other requested learning assessment
    activities
  • Grading standards and criteria
  • A statement that provides an estimate of the
    expected student workload
  • Policies (participation, make-up or late
    assignments, plagiarism, civility)

23
Congruence and Course Design
Outcomes
Activities
Assessments
24
Learning Outcomes
  • Provided at the course level, individual module
    or unit level
  • Clearly stated and measurable
  • Written from learners point of view
  • Appropriate for the target audience
  • Require that students spend a portion of the
    course engaging in higher levels of learning,
    such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation

25
Goals and Objectives
  • What goals do you have for your students that
    they should attain as a result of completing your
    course?
  • Consider measurable objectives that include
  • behavior (What will students do?)
  • conditions (Under what circumstances will they do
    it?)
  • degree (How well will they do it?)

26
Teaching Goals Inventory (TGI)
  • The TGI is a tool for identifying and clarifying
    teaching goals. It was
  • developed by Thomas Angelo and Patricia Cross as
    part of the Classroom Research Project,
  • funded by Ford and Pew grants, and
  • shaped by nearly 5,000 college faculty who
    participated in the initial survey.
  • Available online http//fm.iowa.uiowa.edu/fmi/xsl
    /tgi/data_entry.xsl?-dbtgi_data-layLayout01-vi
    ew

(Angelo Cross, 1993)

27
Purpose of the TGI
  • Identify essential course goals
  • Clarify teaching priorities
  • Gauge the fit between your teaching priorities
    and your primary teaching role
  • Compare individual priorities with priorities of
    faculty at other institutions
  • Provide a process for linking formative
    assessments to goals

(Angelo Cross, 1993)
28
TGI Clusters
  • Higher order thinking skills
  • Basic academic success skills
  • Discipline-specific knowledge and skills
  • Liberal arts and academic values
  • Work and career preparation
  • Personal development

(Angelo Cross, 1993)
29
The A.B.C.D. Method
  • Audience Who are your learners?
  • Behavior What do you expect them to do?
  • Condition Under what conditions do you want the
    learner to be able to do it?
  • Degree What is the standard for acceptable
    performance?

A B C d
30
Consider Audience
  • Distribute a questionnaire to gather learner
    profile information
  • Review student records
  • Modify course goals to match the student
    population, if necessary
  • Design and select appropriate learning materials
    and activities to meet student needs

31
Learner Profile
  • Cognitive
  • aptitude
  • reading level
  • language development
  • learning styles
  • computer literacy
  • prerequisite skills knowledge
  • Physiological
  • age, sex, health
  • sensory perception (visual, auditory, tactile)

32
Learner Profile
  • Psychosocial
  • interests
  • motivation
  • attitude toward subject
  • academic self concept
  • peer relationships
  • beliefs
  • cooperation/competition
  • socioeconomic background
  • racial/ethnic background
  • working status

33
Implications of Learner Profile
  • Pace
  • Relevance
  • Attention
  • Content of practice items and examples
  • Number and difficulty of practice items and
    examples
  • Amount/kind of structure
  • Selection of instructional media

34
Implications of Learner Profile
  • Grouping of students
  • Level of performance
  • Reading level of instructional materials
  • Vocabulary and terminology used
  • Amount of time allowed
  • Type of feedback
  • Level of learner control
  • Response mode (written, oral)

35
Congruence and Course Design
Outcomes
Activities
Assessments
36
Learning Activities
  • Aligned with the course outcomes
  • Appropriate for the target audience
  • Include thorough instructions, including a
    description of the activity due dates, and a
    grading rubric
  • Engaging, active and use a variety of
    instructional methods to accommodate diverse
    learning preferences
  • Provide opportunities to apply course content to
    authentic activities

37
Engage Your Students
  • At the beginning of the semester
  • assess student technology experience and access
    to the environment
  • include a demonstration of the online environment
  • establish ground rules for online interactions
  • Two ways to actively engage your students through
    the use of technology
  • chat sessions
  • discussion forums

38
The Active Learning Continuum
(Bonwell Sutherland, 1996)
39
Technology as a Lever
  • Using technology to put the Seven Principles of
    Good Practice into use http//www.tltgroup.org/pro
    grams/seven.html
  • TLT 7 principles library of teaching ideas
    http//www.tltgroup.org/seven/Library_TOC.htm

(Chickering Ehrmann, 1996)
40
Tools and Technology
  • Presentations
  • Assignments
  • Discussion forums
  • Chats
  • Blogs
  • Wikis
  • Video conferences
  • Posted resources

41
Congruence and Course Design
Outcomes
Activities
Assessments
42
Assessments
  • How will you know if they got it?
  • What form of assessment would demonstrate student
    mastery the most clearly?
  • How can you move beyond just using assessment to
    audit student learning?

43
Assessments
  • Aligned with course outcomes
  • Shared at the beginning of the course clearly
    communicating expectations with respect to
    quality of work desired
  • Varied to address different learning preferences
  • Assess multiple levels of Blooms taxonomy
  • Include multiple opportunities for prompt,
    meaningful feedback
  • Designed to gather both formative and summative
    information

44
Keys to Online Assessment
  • Frequent
  • Formative and summative
  • Variety
  • Minimize grading
  • Maximize feedback
  • Opportunity for relearning and reassessment

45
Formative Assessment
  • Purpose is to improve the quality of student
    learning
  • Provides faculty with information on what, how
    much, and how well students are learning
  • An on-going process of feedback
  • Emphasis is on giving useful advice for
    improvement

46
Summative Assessment
  • Purpose is to provide evidence for evaluating or
    grading students
  • Tests must be demonstrably reliable, valid, and
    free of bias
  • Summarizes student learning after a sustained
    period of learning
  • Grading is the primary emphasis

47
Easy to Implement Techniques
  • Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) simple
    activities that can
  • provide you feedback about how your students are
    doing
  • help your students monitor their own learning
  • focus your students attention on course content
    through reflection and writing
  • allow you to punctuate your presentations with
    learning activities

48
Basic Assumptions of CATs
  • Learning is directly related to teaching
  • Effective assessment begins with clear, specific
    goals and objectives
  • Students need appropriate feedback, early and
    often
  • The best type of assessment to evaluate teaching
    and learning is that which is created and
    conducted by the faculty, themselves
  • Classroom assessment does not require specialized
    training

(Angelo Cross, 1993)
49
Examples of CATs
  • Background Knowledge Probe
  • Punctuated Presentations
  • Minute Paper
  • The Muddiest Point
  • Think Pair Share
  • Complete a Sentence Starter

(Angelo Cross, 1993)
50
Background Knowledge Probe
  • How familiar are you with Angelo and Crosss
    Classroom Assessment Techniques A Handbook for
    College Teachers?
  • What assessment techniques, if applicable do you
    routinely use in your classes?

51
Punctuated Presentations
  • Incorporate questions into your presentation for
    self-assessment
  • Ask students to pause the presentation to allow
    them to consolidate and share their thoughts in a
    discussion forum, blog, or journal
  • Give two mini-presentations separated by an small
    group study session built around a study guide

52
Minute Paper
  • What technique do you think you could use in your
    online environment?
  • Specifically, where do you see its use?

53
Muddiest Point
  • What about incorporating classroom assessment
    techniques into your online learning environment
    is still confusing to you?
  • More examples of CATs
  • http//www2.honolulu.hawaii.edu/facdev/guidebk/tea
    chtip/assess-2.htm
  • http//www.humboldt.edu/celt/tips/a_few_examples_o
    f_classroom_assessment_techniques

54
Grading Made Easy
  • Details in syllabus
  • Assignment details
  • Peer review
  • Self-assessment
  • Portfolios
  • Feedback forms
  • Rubrics

55
Overview of Rubrics
  • Rubrics are criterion-referenced rules for
    assessing student performance constructed by
  • identifying performance dimensions
  • stating criteria for expected student performance
  • articulating distinctions among levels of actual
    student performance
  • translated into scales for scoring

56
Ongoing Course Improvement
  • Use a mid-term survey to get feedback from
    students and make appropriate adjustments
  • Survey the students at the end of the course
    about specific strategies they believed assisted
    them in learning
  • Take the time at the end of the course to reflect
    about what was successful and what you would like
    to change

Mid-term survey What do you like best about the
course/instruction? What do you like least about
the course/instruction, and how could the
instructor improve the course? What could you do
to make the course better for you and the
instructor?
57
Questions
58
Thank You for Your Participation!
  • Debra Dunlap Runshe, Instructional Development
    Specialist
  • University Information Technology Services
    Learning Technologies
  • Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
  • Information Technology and Communications Complex
    (IT 342H)535 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis,
    IN 46202
  • Phone 317-278-0589 
  • Email drunshe_at_iupui.edu

59
References
  • Angelo, T. A., Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom
    assessment techniques A handbook for college
    teachers. San Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Bloom, B. S. (ed.). Taxonomy of Educational
    Objectives. 2 vols. New York David McKay Co.,
    1956.
  • Bonk, C. J., Zhang, K. (2008). Empowering
    online learning 100 activities for reading,
    reflecting, displaying, doing. San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass.
  • California State, Chico. Rubric for Online
    Instruction. Retrieved November 16, 2010, from
    http//www.csuchico.edu/celt/roi/
  • Chickering, A. W. Ehrmann S. E. (1996,
    October). Implementing the seven principles
    Technology as lever. Electronic version. AAHE
    Bulletin, 3-6. Retrieved November 16, 2010, from
    http//www.tltgroup.org/programs/seven.html

60
References
  • Chickering, A. W., and Gamson, Z. F. (1987).
    Seven principles for good practice in
    undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin 39(7)
    3-7.
  • Conrad, R. Donaldson, J. A. (2004). Engaging
    the online learner Activities and resources for
    creative instruction. San Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd
    ed.). San Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Fink, L. D. (2003). Creating significant learning
    experiences An integrated approach to designing
    college courses. San Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Finkelstein, J. (2006). Learning in real time
    Synchronous teaching and learning online. San
    Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Garrison, D. R. Vaughan, N. D. (2008). Blended
    learning in higher education Framework,
    principles, and guidelines. San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass.

61
References
  • Graham, C. R. (2006). Blended learning systems
    definition, current trends, and future
    directions. In Handbook of blended learning
    Global perspectives, local designs, edited by
    C.J. Bonk and C. R. Graham, pp. 3-21. San
    Francisco, CA Pfeiffer Publishing.
  • Halpern, D. F. Hakel, M. D. (2003). Applying
    the science of learning. Change. (July/August).
    37-41.
  • Kuh, G. D., Kinzie, J., Schuh, J. H., Whitt, E.
    J., and Associates. (2005). Student success in
    college Creating conditions that matter. San
    Francisco Jossey-Bass..
  • Mayer, R. E. (2009). Multi-media learning (2nd
    ed.). New York Cambridge University Press.

62
References
  • Molenda, M. (2003). In search of the elusive
    ADDIE model. Performance improvement, 42(5), 34.
    Retrieved November 16, 2010 from
    http//www.indiana.edu/molpage/In20Search20of2
    0Elusive20ADDIE.pdfsearch22ADDIE20Model202B
    history22)
  • Nilson, L.B. (2007). The graphic syllabus and the
    outcomes map Communicating your course. San
    Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Shank, P., ed. (2007). The online learning idea
    book 95 proven ways to enhance technology-bases
    and blended learning. San Francisco Pfeiffer.
  • Smith, R. M. (2008). Conquering the content A
    step-by-step guide to online course design. San
    Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Sousa, D. A. (2001). How the brain learns A
    classroom teacher's guide (2nd ed.). Thousand
    Oaks, CA Corwin Press.

63
References
  • University of Maryland. Quality Matters Peer
    Course Review Rubric. 2005 version in public
    domain at http//www.qualitymatters.org/Documents/
    Matrix20of20Research20Standards20FY0506.pdf
  • U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning,
    Evaluation, and Policy Development. (2010).
    Evaluation of evidence-based practices in online
    learning A meta-analysis and review of online
    learning studies. Electronic version.
    Washington, D.C. Retrieved November 16, 2010,
    from http//www2.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/tech/evidenc
    e-based-practices/finalreport.pdf
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