Food ingredients - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Food ingredients

Description:

Food ingredients Spotlight on food additives * Lists all of the ingredients for a food by weight, from the most to the least. Is a source of information for certain ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:206
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 25
Provided by: pbwo542
Learn more at: http://science3000.pbworks.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Food ingredients


1
Food ingredients
  • Spotlight on food additives

2
Ingredient List on the food label
  • Lists all of the ingredients for a food by
    weight, from the most to the least.
  • Is a source of information for certain nutrients.
  • Is a source of information for people with food
    allergies.

Example
INGREDIENTS WHOLE GRAIN ROLLED OATS, SUGAR, HIGH MONOUNSATURATED CANOLA OIL, ALMOND PIECES, RAISINS, GOLDEN SYRUP, SALT, CRISP RICE (RICE FLOUR, SOY PROTEIN, SUGAR, MALT, SALT), SOY LECITHIN, NATURAL FLAVOUR
3
What are food additives?
  • Any substances or chemicals added to food for
    specific purposes.
  • The Health Canada definition
  • A food additive is any chemical substance that is
    added to food during preparation or storage and
    either becomes a part of the food or affects its
    characteristics for the purpose of achieving a
    particular technical effect.

4
In Canada food additives do not include
  • food ingredients such as salt, sugar, starch
  • vitamins, minerals, amino acids
  • spices, seasonings, flavouring preparations (such
    as monosodium glutamate)
  • agricultural chemicals
  • veterinary drugs or
  • food packaging materials.

5
  • Food additives are used to keep foods safer and
    to make them more appealing.
  • There are over 2000 different additives in common
    use today.
  • Additives added to foods must be listed on the
    food nutrition label (under ingredients).

6
(No Transcript)
7
Types of food additives
  • Anti-caking agents - stop ingredients from
    becoming lumpy.
  • Antioxidants - prevent foods from oxidising, or
    going rancid.
  • Artificial sweeteners - increase the sweetness.
  • Emulsifiers - stop fats from clotting together.
  • Food acids - maintain the right acid level.
  • Colours - enhance or add colour.
  • Humectants - keep foods moist.

8
Regulation
  • Food additives are regulated in Canada under the
    Food and Drug Regulations. All permitted food
    additives and their conditions of use are listed
    in the tables in Division 16 of the Regulations.
  • The Bureau of Chemical Safety within Health
    Canada coordinates the assessment of food
    additive submissions.

9
Are additives safe?
  • Health Canada must approve all food chemicals
    before they can be added to food.
  • Toxicological tests are done on laboratory
    animals to come up with a max. daily dose with
    no obervable effects.
  • The allowable amount for human consumption is
    about 100 times less.

10
Some examples
  • TARTARIC ACID, POTASSIUM ACID TARTRATE, SODIUM
    POTASSIUM TARTRATE, SODIUM TARTRATE
  • Antioxidant used in beverages, candy, ice cream,
    baked goods, yogurt, gelatin desserts, baking
    powder.
  • Tartaric acid occurs naturally in grapes, other
    fruits, and coffee beans. It has an extremely
    tart, acidic taste, which is useful in some
    foods. Most of the tartaric acid we ingest is
    digested by bacteria in the intestines. The 20
    percent that is absorbed is rapidly excreted in
    the urine.

11
  • CALCIUM (or SODIUM) PROPIONATE
  • Preservative used in bread, rolls, pies, cakes.
  • Calcium propionate prevents mold growth on bread
    and rolls. The calcium is a beneficial mineral
    the propionate is safe. Sodium propionate is used
    in pies and cakes, because calcium alters the
    action of chemical leavening agents.

12
  • ALGINATE, PROPYLENE GLYCOL ALGINATE
  • Thickening agent and foam stabilizer used in ice
    cream, cheese, candy, yogurt, beer.
  • Alginate, an apparently safe derivative
  • of seaweed (kelp), maintains the desired
  • texture in dairy products, canned frosting,
  • and other factory-made foods. Propylene
  • glycol alginate, a chemically-modified algin,
  • thickens acidic foods (soda pop, salad
  • dressing) and can stabilize the foam in beer.

13
  • SILICON DIOXIDE
  • Artificial anticaking agent Many powdered foods
    like cake and pudding mixes as well as sugar and
    salt.
  • POLYSORBATE 80
  • Emulsifier ice cream most commonly since it
    makes ice cream smoother and easier to handle, as
    well as increasing its resistance to melting.

14
  • Want to know more about food additives in your
    food? Visit the Food Additives Dictionary
  • http//www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/addit/diction
    /index-eng.php
  • If it is not in the dictionary, it is not a food
    additive.

15
Effects on human health
  • Some food additives have been banned, others are
    under suspicion but the evidence is not clear on
    those.
  • It is up to you to assess the risks and make
    decisions

16
Food additives off the market
  • Cyclamate an artificial sweetener that was
    synthetically produced. It was banned in 1969 in
    the US but is still in use in many countries
    including Canada. It was
  • associated with bladder cancer,
  • and damage to testes. Now not
  • thought to cause cancer directly,
  • but to increase the potency of other carcinogens.

17
  • Ethylene glycol was used as a solvent for food
    colour and flavourings. It was banned in 1998
    because of evidence of kidney damage.

18
  • BUTYLATED HYDROXYANISOLE (BHA)
  • Antioxidant Cereals, chewing gum, potato chips,
    vegetable oil.
  • Antioxidant
  • BHA retards rancidity in fats, oils, and
    oil-containing foods. While some studies indicate
    it is safe, other studies demonstrate that it
    causes cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. Those
    cancers are controversial because they occur in
    the forestomach, an organ that humans do not
    have. However, a chemical that causes cancer in
    at least one organ in three different species
    indicates that it might be carcinogenic in
    humans. That is why the U.S. Department of Health
    and Human Services considers BHA to be
    "reasonably anticipated to be a human
    carcinogen." Nevertheless, the Food and Drug
    Administration still permits BHA to be used in
    foods. This synthetic chemical can be replaced by
    safer chemicals (e.g., vitamin E), safer
    processes (e.g., packing foods under nitrogen
    instead of air), or can simply be left out (many
    brands of oily foods, such as potato chips, don't
    use any antioxidant).

19
  • SODIUM BENZOATE, BENZOIC ACID
  • Preservative Fruit juice, carbonated drinks,
    pickles.
  • Manufacturers have used sodium benzoate (and its
    close relative benzoic acid) for a century to
    prevent the growth of microorganisms in acidic
    foods. The substances occur naturally in many
    plants and animals. They appear to be safe for
    most people, though they cause hives, asthma, or
    other allergic reactions in sensitive
    individuals.
  • Another problem occurs when sodium benzoate is
    used in beverages that also contain ascorbic acid
    (vitamin C). The two substances, in an acidic
    solution, can react together to form small
    amounts of benzene, a chemical that causes
    leukemia and other cancers. Though the amounts of
    benzene that form are small, leading to only a
    very small risk of cancer, there is no need for
    consumers to experience any risk. In the early
    1990s the FDA had urged companies not to use
    benzoate in products that also contain ascorbic
    acid, but in the 2000s companies were still using
    that combination. A lawsuit filed in 2006 by
    private attorneys ultimately forced Coca-Cola,
    PepsiCo, and other soft-drink makers in the U.S.
    to reformulate affected beverages, typically
    fruit-flavored products.

20
Health Claims
Disease risk reduction claims Example A
healthy diet low in saturated and trans fats may
reduce the risk of heart disease. (Naming the
food) is free of saturated and trans fats.
21
Nutrition Claims
  • Are regulated statements made when a food meets
    certain criteria.
  • They are optional, and may be found only on some
    food products.

22
Nutrition ClaimsWhen you want to decrease the
amount of certain nutrients, look for
Free none or hardly any of this nutrient an example is sodium free
Low a small amount an example is low fat
Reduced at least 25 less of the nutrient compared with a similar product an example is reduced in Calories
Light can be used on foods that are reduced in fat or reduced in Calories
23
Nutrition Claims When you want to increase the
amount of certain nutrients, look for
Source contains a significant amount of the nutrient an example is source of fibre
High or good source contains a high amount of the nutrient an example is high in vitamin C
Very high or excellent source contains a very high amount of the nutrient an example is excellent source of calcium
24
General Health Claims
  • General health claims are generally developed
  • Consumers should not solely rely on general
    health claims to make informed food choices.

by third party organizations by corporations
About PowerShow.com