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Education and Competencies for International Collaborators in Nursing and Midwifery

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Title: Education and Competencies for International Collaborators in Nursing and Midwifery


1
Education and Competencies for International
Collaborators in Nursing and Midwifery
The 24th Conference of the JAIH at
Sendai Workshop Development of International
Health Experts
  • Junko Tashiro, RN, PhD
  • WHO Collaborating Center for Nursing in PHC
  • St. Lukes College of Nursing, Tokyo, Japan
  • August 6th 2009

2
St. Luke's College of Nursing, Main Building in
Tokyo Japan
Greetings from St. Lukes College of Nursing
2
3
Contents
  • To overview our work on capacity development of
    Japanese nurses collaborating with partners in
    host countries
  • To share our experience on developing a
    curriculum of Master Program for Global Health
    Nursing to build capacity of Japanese nurse
    collaborators working with partners in host
    countries based on our studies

4
How does Nursing Education in Japan obtain Goals
of Global Health?
  • Emerging an area of Global or International
    Health Nursing Midwifery
  • - 1960s Japanese nurses began working for
    develop-
  • ment of nursing and health in
    host countries (Mori,1999).
  • -1996 Regulation of Basic Nursing
    Education enacted
  • BSN programs started
    International nursing.
  • -2009 Revised Regulation of Basic Nursing
    Education
  • Diploma Program have to
    start teaching International
  • Nursing or Disaster
    Nursing

5
Current Situation of Higher Education in Global
Health or International Nursing and Midwifery
  • Based on Web-based survey (Tashiro et al, 2008)
  • Some kind of Global Health or International
    Nursing is provided
  • 67(40) out of the 168 baccalaureate nursing
    programs
  • 16(15) out of the 104 masters programs
  • 3 out of the 4 midwifery master programs
  • 13 out of the 47 nursing programs
  • 2008 International or Global Health Midwifery
    and Nursing Consortium was formed

6
Designing a Curriculum for an International
Nursing Masters of Science in Japan Capacity
Building for International Collaborators to
Strengthen Nursing and Midwifery
  • WHO Collaborating Center for Nursing in PHC
  • St. Lukes College of Nursing, Tokyo, Japan
  • Junko Tashiro,RN PhD Naoko Hayashi, RN, PhD
    Fumiko Kajii, RN, PhD Yoshimi Yamazaki, RN, MNS
    Akiko Hayashi, RN, MS Hiromi Eto, RN, CNM, DNSc
    Yumi Sakyo, RN, MNS Shigeko Horiuchi, RN, CNM,
    DNSc.
  • Funded by a Grant for International Medical
    Cooperation Study, International Medical Center
    in Japan
  • (20022004)

7
Background
  • Japanese nurses have cooperated with their
    counter-parts in developing countries since 1960.
  • Today number of Japanese nurses nurse-midwives
    are working in order to strengthen nursing
    Midwifery in developing countries
  • Limited opportunities existed for advanced
    education as a specialist collaborator in Global
    Health or International Nursing.

8
Purpose
  • To design a specialty of International Nursing in
    a masters program in Japan, based on
    competencies of international nursing
    collaborators for nurses who are interested in
    working for and in developing countries.

9
Method
  • First Phase Study the existing competencies of
    Nurse International Collaborators
  • Data collection Interview survey
  • Participants
  • Japanese nurses who worked or are
  • working for more than one year in
  • developing countries to strengthening
  • that countrys nursing and midwifery.
  • Analysis Content analysis
  • Second Phase Curriculum Development
  • A conceptual framework of International
    Nursing Collaboration was derived from the data.

10
Findings
  • Snow-ball sampling technique located twenty-six
    (26) nurses who were interviewed
  • 39 categories of competences were derived from
    interview data.
  • 2 major types of categories personal and basic
    knowledge and competencies and international
    collaborating competences.
  • They were organized into 4 levels of education
    undergraduate, continuing-ed, graduate-masters,
    and graduate-doctoral level of education.

11
A Model of Competencies of International
Nursing Collaborators (Experts )
12
Competencies and Educational Content for
Undergraduates
  • Personal Basic Knowledge Educational
    Content
    Competencies

Cultural Adaptability Applicability Language Communication Skill Basic knowledge of International Nursing Cultural Experience Language and Communication Introduction of International Nursing
13
Data-Driven Competencies for International
Nursing Collaborator
  • Information gathering
  • Problem Analysis
  • Planning
  • Problem Solving
  • Management
  • Networking
  • Evaluation

14
Curriculum for Global Health Nursing in Masters
Program
  • Educational Aim
  • To provide students with the basic skills to
    serve as leaders in the nursing field in Global
    Health, adding knowledge and skills in
    international public health medical services to
    their own specialist nursing abilities.

15
Learning Objectives of Master in Global Health
Nursing
  • Increase specialized knowledge of international
    nursing, based on fundamental skills ( e.g.
    Language ability, cultural adaptability)
  • Strengthen ability
  • a) to make an accurate assessment of nursing
    issue in the specialized field of international
    cooperation, covering different cultural,
    socioeconomic, and public health systems.
  • b) to plan cooperation and assistance projects
    responding to the nursing needs of the
    counterpart nation.

16
Continued - Learning Objectives
  • c) to build collaborative relationships with
    local counterparts, forming a practical model,
    and serving as a consultant and educator
  • d) to use human and material resources to set
    directions in development and problem solving to
    achieve goals
  • e) to evaluate the results of international
    nursing collaborative projects
  • f) to assist in nursing development using methods
    unique to the counterpart nation

17
Core Courses (6 Credit hours)
  • Introduction to international nursing (2)
  • International nursing collaboration (2)
  • Comparative nursing research (2)

18
Elective Courses (6 credits)
  • Comparative nursing policy making (2)
  • Comparative community health
    nursing (2)
  • Comparative nursing education (2)
  • Comparative nursing administration (2)
  • Comparative clinical nursing (2)
  • Comparative nursing research
    collaboration (2)

19
Thesis Research (8)
Major fields (12)
2nd Year
Practicum (2)
Elective Minor Courses (6) Comparative nursing
policy making (2) Comparative community health
and nursing (2) Comparative nursing
education (2) Comparative nursing administration
(2) Comparative clinical nursing (2) Comparative
nursing research collaboration (2)
Core Courses (6) Introduction to international
nursing (2) International nursing collaboration
(2) Comparative nursing research (2)
1st Year
Basic Subjects (12)
Nursing management administration (2) Nursing
education (2) Community nursing (2) Clinical
nursing (2)
Nursing research (2), Nursing theory (2),
Statistics (2) Nursing ethics (2), Anatomy
Physiology(2), Pathology(2), Nursing
Sociology(2), Nursing psychology (2),
Fig. Global Health Nursing Curriculum Diagram
20
Progress of Masters Program in Global Health
Nursing
  • Our Masters program in Global Health Nursing
    started in 2005, and two students were enrolled.
  • Last three years, total of four graduates
    completed the program, and two are working as
    International Collaborators in Tanzania and
    Indonesia.
  • Further development is needed to meet educational
    needs of nurses and midwives working for
    Improvement of Global Health

21
Acknowledgements
  • We wish acknowledge advisors Dr. William
    Holzemer, Dr. Caroline White, Dr. Beverly
    McElmurry and our English editor. Dr. Sarah
    Porter.
  • We also acknowledge our previous research
    members Prof. Michiko Hishinuma, Dr. Naoko
    Arimori, Masako Sakai, RN, MNS Yuko Hirabayashi,
    RN, MNS.
  • This study was funded by a Grant for
    International Medical Cooperation, National
    International Medical Center in Japan, Ministry
    of Health and Labor in Japan
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