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Building a Professional Learning in Inver Grove Heights Schools

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Title: Building a Professional Learning in Inver Grove Heights Schools


1
Building a Professional Learning in Inver Grove
Heights Schools
  • November 1, 2012
  • Susan Huff
  • susan.huff_at_nebo.edu

2
Transforming a school to a professional learning
community is a journey that takes time and effort.
3
Three objectives
  • Review the big picture of a professional learning
    community
  • Confirm great things happening at your
    individual schools
  • Look for areas of growth

4
Norms for Us
  • Listen to learn and apply
  • Participate fully
  • Paraphrase, clarify
  • Focus--pay attention to signal

5
  • What is a PLC?
  • Educators committed to working collaboratively
    in ongoing processes of collective inquiry and
    action research in order to achieve better
    results for the students they serve. PLCs
    operate under the assumption that the key to
    improved learning for students is continuous,
    job-embedded learning for educators.
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006)

6
Why PLCs?
  • Throughout our ten-year study, whenever we
    found an effective school or an effective
    department within a school, without exception
    that school or department has been a part of a
    collaborative professional learning community.
    (Milbrey McLaughlin)

7
3 Big Ideas of PLC
  • Unwavering focus on student learning
  • Collaborative teaming
  • A results orientation

  • (DuFour Eaker, 1998)

8
Four Crucial Questions (DuFour, 2006)
  • What do we want each student to learn?
  • How we will know when each student has learned
    it?
  • How will we respond when a student experiences
    difficulty in learning?
  • How can we enrich and extend their learning when
    they already know it?

9
In a professional learning community the focus
shifts from ensuring that students are taught to
ensuring that students learn. (Bryk et al., 1999
Newmann Wehlage, 1995 Hord 1997 Louis et al.,
1996)
10
A professional learning community is dependent
upon a culture of collaboration, where teachers
must have embedded time for frequent, structured
collaboration among teachers on the same grade
level or teaching the same content. (DuFour,
2007)
11
Focus on results
  • Goal and results orientation
  • Common assessments that hold all students to a
    common standard
  • Data-based decision making
  • Formative and summative assessments
  • Collective reflection on current reality

12
There is clear consensus among leading
educational researchers as to the best practices
for improving schools. When staff work together
as a professional learning communitywhen they
work together to clarify purpose and priorities,
establish and contribute to collaborative teams,
participate in continuous improvement cycles of
gathering data on student achievement, identify
areas of concern, generate strategies for
improving students performance . . .
13
  • . . . support each other as they implement those
    strategies, and gather new data to assess the
    impact of their collective effortsand when they
    are relentless in their efforts to improve
    achievement for all students, they increase the
    likelihood of sustained, substantive school
    improvement. The research is clear and
    compelling on this point.
    (DuFour, 2003)

14
Nebos Non-Negotiables for all schools . . . all
teams
  • Team Norms
  • I Can Statements for Student Learning
  • Common Curriculum Map
  • Common Formative Assessment for Each
  • I Can Statement
  • Data Assessment
  • SMART Goals

15
Heres what . . . why . . . how. . .
  • Essential concepts / common curriculum
  • Common assessments
  • Collaboration
  • Data analysis
  • SMART Goals

16
Module 1
  • Essential Concepts
  • Common Curriculum

17
Focus on Learning
  1. What do students need to learn?
  2. How do we know they know it?
  3. What are we going to do if they dont get it?
  4. What are we going to do if they already know it?

Focus on Results
Collaborative Culture
18
Heres what . . .
  • What knowledge, skills, and dispositions should
    each student acquire as a result of this course
    and each unit of instruction within this course?
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006, p. 43)
  • -a guaranteed and viable curriculum-

19
Heres why . . .
  • As teachers assume collective responsibility for
    student learning, what unites them is a common
    curriculum.
  • (Lee, Smith, Croninger,1995)

20
Heres why . . .
  • A common curriculum eliminates the instructional
    lottery that results when teachers are free to
    teach whatever they desire.
  • (McLaughlin Talbert, 2001)

21
Heres why . . .
  • Without a common curriculum, any individual
    students chance of receiving standards based
    curriculum depends on which teacher he draws in
    the lottery of class or teacher assignments.
  • (McLaughlin Talbert, 2001)

22
Heres how . . .
  • Understanding By Design (UbD)
  • 1. Identify desired results.
  • (What do we want students to know and be able to
    do? Standards . . . Outcomes)
  • 2. Determine acceptable evidence. (Assessment)
  • 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction.
  • (Design lessons)
  • (Wiggins
    McTighe, 2005)

23
Marzano
  • Intended Curriculum
  • State standards
  • District curriculum adoptions
  • Implemented Curriculum
  • Curriculum taught by teacher
  • Attained Curriculum
  • Curriculum learned by the student

24
Criteria for Identifying Essential Common
Outcomes
  • ENDURANCE
  • are students expected to retain the
    skills/knowledge long after the test is completed
  • LEVERAGE
  • is this skill/knowledge applicable to many
    academic disciplines
  • READINESS FOR THE NEXT LEVEL OF LEARNING
  • is this skill/knowledge preparing the student for
    success in the next grade/course (Reeves,
    2005)

25
Protocol to Clarify Address Priority
Standards (Erkens, 2012)
  1. Examine all of your state standards.
  2. Deconstruct standards for team clarity.
  3. Identify your power standards using three
    criteria endurance, leverage, readiness.
  4. Reach team consensus on power standards.
  5. Document standards, including recorded numbers
    and letters of selected standards.

26
  1. Check for vertical alignment and sequence
    standards.
  2. Identify targets within standards.
  3. Design assessments to align.
  4. Identify curriculum materials to support required
    learning, to address standards, and to help
    learners be successful on assessments.
  5. Identify instructional strategies that will
    best help you teach the curriculum.

27
Module 2
  • Common Assessments

28
Focus on Learning
  1. What do students need to learn?
  2. How do we know they know it?
  3. What are we going to do if they dont get it?
  4. What are we going to do if they already know it?

Focus on Results
Collaborative Culture
29
Heres what . . .
  • Common ongoing formative team-made assessments
    made from multiple sources given by a team of
    teachers with the intention of collaboratively
    examining the results for
  • shared learning
  • instructional planning for individual students
  • curriculum, instruction, and/or assessment
    modifications

30
  • Heres why . . .
  • Team-developed common assessments
  • Are more efficient.
  • Promote equity.
  • Monitor and improve student learning.
  • Inform and improve the practice of individual
    teachers and teams of teachers.
  • Build team capacity to achieve at higher levels.
  • Are essential to systematic interventions when
    students do not learn. (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker,
    2008)

31
  • Heres why . . .
  • Team-developed common assessments
  • Increase accuracy and reliability.
  • Promote continued development of assessment
    literacy for teachers.
  • Increase collective efficacy.
  • (Cassandra Erkens)

32
Formative vs. Summative
  • It isnt the method that determines whether the
    assessment is summative or formative, it is how
    the results are used.

33
Heres how . . . to write CAs
  • Teacher teams write new assessments based on
    standards.
  • Teams use multiple sources for assessment items
    (parts of textbook assessments, parts of computer
    test item pools, as appropriate).
  • Teams revise assessments for future use as they
    evaluate their effectiveness.

34
Sample common assessment usually about 10
questions. Name ______________ Write the number
sentence you would use to solve the problem. 1.
Kelsy went to the store and bought 56 pencils.
She broke 20 of them. How many did she have
left? 2. In the park there were 7 trees. Each
tree had 4 branches. How many branches did the
trees have in all? 3. Mr. Fox has 5 tables in
his room. 3 students sit at each table. How
many students does Mr. Fox have in all? 4. Pete
bought 14 mice at the pet store to feed his
snake. He went back and bought 9 more. How many
mice did Pete buy altogether? 5. We learned 18
cursive letters before Christmas and 22 after.
How many cursive letters have we learned in
all?
35
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36
Heres how . . . to use CAs
  • Seek evidence of student learning
  • What does this student work tell us about what
    students know and can do?
  • What does this student work tell us about what
    students are still missing?
  • What indicators, if any, offer insight into
    student misconceptions and highlight potential
    intervention strategies?

37
Common Assessments Reflections
  • Discuss the assessment task with team.
  • Examine data and identify areas for team
    discussion.
  • -As a team Which learning targets from the
    assessment require more attention?
  • -As a team Which students require additional
    support?

38
  • -As an individual teacher Which area was my
    lowest, and how can I improve?
  • -As a team or individual Which students did not
    master which targets?
  • 3. What is your teams plan of action to address
    results?

39
Module 3
  • Collaboration

40
Heres what . . . Collaboration Defined
  • A systematic process in which we work together,
    interdependently, to analyze and impact
    professional practice in order to improve our
    individual and collective results.
  • (DuFour,
    DuFour, Eaker, 2007)

41
What is a team?
  • A group of people working interdependently
    toward a common goal for which members are
    mutually accountable.
  • (DuFour, 2007)

42
Heres why . . .
  • Improving schools requires collaborative
    cultures. Without collaborative skills and
    relationships, it is not possible to learn and to
    continue to learn as much as you need to know to
    improve. (Michael Fullan)

43
Heres why . . .
  • Creating a collaborative culture is the single
    most important factor for successful school
    improvement initiatives and the first order of
    business for those seeking to enhance the
    effectiveness of their schools. (Eastwood
    Lewis)

44
Heres why . . .
  • Enhanced teaching and learning result through
    collaboration.
  • (Peterson, McCarthey, Elmore, 1995 Fullan,
    1993 McLaughlin Talbert, 2001 Kruse, Louis,
    Bryk, 1994, Bryk Camburn, Louis, 1999
    Newmann, 1994 Newmann Wehlage, 1995 Lee,
    Smith, Croninger, 1995 Sebring, Bryk, Easton,
    Luppescu, Thum, Lopez, Smith, 1995 Shellard,
    2004)

45
Heres how create teams
  • The best team structure is simple
  • a team of teachers who teach the same course
    or grade level.
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006, p. 93)

46
Heres how . . . Make Teams Effective
  • Embed collaboration in routine practices of the
    school with focus on learning.
  • Time for collaboration is built into the school
    day and school calendar.
  • Products of collaboration are made explicit.

47
(More Keys to Effective Teams)
  • Team norms guide collaboration.
  • Teams focus on key questions.
  • Teams pursue specific and measurable performance
    goals.
  • Teams have access to relevant information.
    (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker)

48
Heres how . . .
  • Structure time for the work of collaborative
    teams.
  • (see Simple Ways Schools Find
  • Time to Work Together)

49
Heres how . . . Focus on the right things
  • The fact that teachers collaborate will do
    nothing to improve a school. The pertinent
    question is not, Are they collaborating? but
    rather, What are they collaborating about?
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many,
    2006, p. 91)

50
Unfocused Collaboration . . .
  • May be instruments for preserving the status quo,
    inhibiting analysis and innovation.
  • May mutually reinforce poorly formed habits.
  • May force teachers to consider beliefs and
    practices based on bad practice.
  • May be about storytellingmostly complaint.
  • (Little, 1990)

51
  • The 4 Crucial Questions focus collaboration
  • on the right things
  • What is it we want our students to learn?
  • How will we know if each student has learned it?
  • How will we respond when some students do not
    learn it?
  • How can we extend and enrich the learning for
    students who have demonstrated proficiency?
  • (DuFour, DuFour,
    Eaker, Many, 2006)

52
Structural Conditions
  • Time to Meet
  • Team Norms
  • Team Focus
  • Team Accountability
  • (see Collaboration Agenda
    and Leader/Scribe Assignments)

53
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54
Team collaboration binder
  • Team Norms
  • Facilitator/Scribe Assignments
  • Teams Daily Schedule
  • Collaboration Agenda (one for each weeks
    collaboration)
  • Curriculum Maps
  • Essential Learning Outcomes (or Power Standards)
  • Copy of Core Curriculum
  • Copies of Teams Common Assessments

55
  • A focus on learning
  • With collaborative teams.
  • Results orientation
  • Theyre our schools dreams.
  • We intervene early
  • With more time and support.
  • Theres curriculum mapping
  • On which we consort.

56
  • Teams common assessments
  • Every student will take.
  • We analyze data,
  • Then decisions we make.
  • A focus on learning.
  • Youre on a great team.
  • Results orientation
  • Its not just a dream!

57
Module 4
  • Collaborative
  • Data Analysis

58
  • Heres what . . .
  • To change data to information, we need a basis of
    comparison.
  • Data must be easily accessible.
  • Data must be openly shared.
  • (DuFour, Dufour,
    Eaker)

59
  • Heres what . . .
  • Sources of data PLCs use
  • Assessment data
  • Standardized tests (knowledge check-up, G/T
    identification compare to other schools in the
    nation)
  • Criterion-referenced tests
  • Unit tests / quizzes / assignments
  • Ongoing assessments / running records
  • Rubrics tied to student work or product

60
  • Perception data
  • Opinion surveys, needs surveys indicators of
    school quality survey
  • Statistical data
  • SES, ESL, mobility, ethnicity, attendance
    punctuality, office referrals discipline,
    graduation rates

61
Heres why . . .
  • Collaboratively examining student work promotes
    collective responsibility for student learning.
  • (Langer, Colton, Goff, 2003 Dearman Alber,
    2005)

62
Heres why . . .
  • When teachers engage in this collaborative
    activity, they must agree on common proficiency
    standards for student work. This reduces
    variation among teachers about whether student
    work meets the standard.
    (Langer, Colton, Goff, 2003)

63
Heres how . . . we do it at Spanish Oaks
  • 1. Teachers identify a target learning area.
  • 2. Teachers determine standards that will be
    taught.
  • 3. Teachers select or design a common assessment
    to measure mastery of that standard and a
    pre-assessment.
  • 4. Teachers give pre-assessment and group
    students for more time and support.

64
  • 5. Teachers then share instructional materials
    and collaborate on best practices to teach the
    concept.
  • 6. At the end of the agreed upon instructional
    period, each teacher gives the common assessment
    within the same window of time.
  • 7. The assessment results are then brought to
    the team for analysis.
  • 8. The group makes a plan to help each student
    improve who has not yet met the standard.

65
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66
  • Concept 2-digit Multiplication with a 2-digit
    Multiplier

Mr. Jones Mr. Jones Miss Ruiz Miss Ruiz Mrs. Smith Mrs. Smith Mr. Terry Mr. Terry Reteach Practice/Enrich Enrich
1. Rebecca 10 1. Rodney 10 1. Luis 10 1. Alex 10 Brian Rene (8) Cindy
2. John 10 2. Rebecca 10 2. Tom 10 2. Jack 10 Katelyn Melissa (8) Samantha
3. Jose 9 3. George 10 3. Sydney 9 3. Luke 9 Lydia Ryan C. (8) Trudy
4. Rene 8 4. Melissa 8 4. Ryan C. 8 4. Lauren 6 Brent Marisa (8) Walter
5. Joshua 10 5. Angelica 10 5. Brian 7 5. Beverly 9 Lauren Natalie (8) Lucky
6. Helen 10 6. Edgar 10 6. Katelyn 7 6. Will 7 Will Rodney Randy
7. Antonio 10 7. Eduardo 10 7. Sam 9 7. Max 10 Jessica Rebecca Alex
8. Oliver 9 8. Simone 10 8. Jared 9 8. Christian 10 Liz George Jack
9. Libby 10 9. Elizabeth 10 9. Marisa 8 9. Jessica 6 Angelica Luke
10. Kaitlyn 10 10. Trent 10 10. Lydia 7 10. Ben 9 Edgar Beverly
11. Tim 9 11. Ryan H. 10 11. Brent 7 11. Rachel O 10 Eduardo Max
12. Roger 10 12. Cindy 10 12. Gina 10 12. Liz 7 Simone Christian
13. Wendy 10 13. Samantha 10 13. Lexie 10 13. Natalie 8 Elizabeth Ben
14. Marisole 10 14. Trudy 10 14. Carter 10 14. Camille 10 Trent Rachel O.
15. Andrew 10 15. Walter 10 15. Wyatt 9 15. Alisa 10 Ryan H. Camille
16. Rachel T 10 16. Lucky 10 16. Nicole 9 Alisa
17. Georgia 9 17. Randy 9 17. Maggie 9 Jones class Smiths class
Teacher Teacher Teacher
Average 9.7 9.8 8.7 8.7 Ruiz Jones Smith
67
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68
Power Standards / ELOs
  • Endurance
  • Leverage
  • Essential for the next level of instruction.
  • (Reeves, 2005)

69
Keys to Formative Assessment
  • Is it used to identify students who are
    experiencing difficulty in their learning?
  • Are students who are having difficulty provided
    with additional time and support for learning?
  • Are students given an additional opportunity to
    demonstrate their learning?

  • (DuFour keynote at PLC Institutes 2007, p. 80)

70
Module 5
  • SMART Goals

71
SMART Goals contribute to a results orientation.
  • Strategic and specific
  • Measurable
  • Attainable
  • Results-oriented
  • Time-bound (ONeill Conzemius, 2006)

72
  • Heres what . . .
  • Strategic goals are linked to strategic
    priorities that are part of a larger vision of
    success for the entire school district.
  • Strategic and specific means that these goals
    will have both broad-based and long-term impact
    because they are focused on the specific needs of
    the students for whom the goal is intended.
  • (Conzemius ONeill, 2002, p. 4)

73
  • Heres what . . .
  • Measurable means being able to know whether
    actions made the kind of difference we wanted
    being able to measure a change in results because
    of those actions.
  • (Conzemius ONeill, 2002, p. 5)

74
  • Heres what . . .
  • Attainable means a goal is within the realm of
    our influence of control, and doable given
    current resources.
  • (Conzemius ONeill, 2002)

75
  • Heres what . . .
  • Results-oriented means goals are aimed at
    specific outcomes that can be measured or
    observed. They define what is expected and a
    desired end point.
  • student achievement
  • of students who improve
  • learning that can be defined and measured
    (Conzemius ONeill, 2002)

76
  • Heres what . . .
  • Time-bound means agreeing on a time frame for
    achieving the goal to keep it a priority and give
    it some urgency.
  • (Conzemius ONeill, 2002)

77
Heres why . . .
  • Goals represent measurable commitments that can
    be used to assess progress toward the vision.
  • (DuFour Eaker, 1998)

78
Heres why . . .
  • SMART goals help us monitor which of our efforts
    are making a difference and by how much.
  • (Conzemius ONeill, 2002, p. 5)

79
Heres why . . .
  • When we establish clear learning goals, the
    effect on student achievement can be as much as a
    41 percentile gain.
  • (Marzano, What Works in Schools, 2003)

80
Heres how . . . Tips for Writing Goals
  • Goals should be clearly linked to the vision.
  • Goals should be limited in number (five or fewer)
    to ensure focus.
  • Goals should focus on the desired outcome rather
    than on the means to achieve the outcome.
    (DuFour Eaker, 2007)

81
Heres how . . . Ask broad questions . . .
  • In which areas of our tests were our students
    weakest?
  • What patterns do we see in the data?
  • What does disaggregated data tell us about our
    subpopulations (ethnicity, poverty, special
    education)?

82
Is this a SMART goal?
All the students in our grade level will
demonstrate mastery of math facts.
Students will leave first grade with a love of
learning and a desire to become a productive
citizen.
Ninety-five percent of the students within our
team will read on grade level as measured by our
district benchmark reading assessment by May
2013.
83
  • allthingsplc.info

84
Check out my Google Site
  • https//sites.google.com/a/nebo.edu/susan-huff
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