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THE OPPORTUNITY: From

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Title: THE OPPORTUNITY: From


1
THE OPPORTUNITY From Brutal Facts to the Best
Schools Weve Ever Had Dr. Mike
Schmokerschmoker_at_futureone.com928/522-0006Calh
oun ISD Marshall, Michigan March
5, 2008
2
INTRODUCTION DO WE TRULY WANT BETTER SCHOOLS?
  • Because organizations only improve
  • where the truth is told and the brutal facts
    confronted
  • Jim Collins

3
BRUTAL FACTS
  • Only 7 of low-income students will ever earn a
    college degree

4
BRUTAL FACTS
  • Only 32 of our college-bound students are
    adequately prepared for college
  • Understanding University Success
  • Center for Educational Policy Research

5
COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
DISCUSSION PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • Drawing inferences/conclusions from texts
  • Analyzing conflicting source documents
  • Supporting arguments with evidence
  • Solving complex problems with no obvious answer
  • David Conley
  • College Knowledge

6
BRUTAL FACTS
  • The TEACHER EFFECT makes all other differences
    pale in comparison
  • William Sanders
  • Five years of effective teaching can completely
    close the gap between low-income students and
    others.
  • Marzano Kain Hanushek

7
IMPACT of TEACHING
  • Pittsburgh Schools 69 range of difference
  • Mortimore Sammons teaching has 6 to 10 times
    as much impact as other factors
  • Dylan Wiliam 400 speed of learning
    differences

8
REALITY CHECK
  • Effective practices never take root in more than
    a small proportion of classrooms and schools
  • Tyack and Cuban
  • Effective teaching is quite different from the
    teaching that is typically found in most
    classrooms
  • Odden and Kelley

9
THE REAL OPPORTUNITY
  • Most of us in education are mediocre at what we
    do
  • Tony Wagner
  • Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • EVERY STUDY of classroom practice reveals that
    most teaching is mediocre--or worse
  • Goodlad Sizer Resnick Powell, Farrar
    Cohen Learning 24/7 Classroom Study

10
BRUTAL FACTS
  • After decades of initiatives, programs plans,
    we still DO NOT INSPECT instruction, i.e.
  • 1. WHAT we teach (essential standards)
  • or
  • 2. HOW WELL we teach
  • (effective lessons/units)
  • Gordon Elmore Marzano Tyack Cuban
    Hess Berliner
  • The case of SEAN CONNORS

11
EFFECTIVE LESSON WHAT HOW
  • Clarity _at_ essential standard being learned that
    day (introductory paragraphs)
  • Scaffolded (step-by-step) instruction
  • Check for understanding/formative assessment
    during the lesson
  • Models/exemplars students studied these in pairs
  • Engagement attentivenessstudents
    monitored/called on randomly
  • Students write own intro. paragraph
  • only when most/all students are ready

12
WHY IS MOST TEACHING MEDIOCRE?
  • The administrative superstructure of schools
    exists to buffer teaching from
  • OUTSIDE INSPECTION
  • Richard Elmore
  • YOU CANT EXPECT WHAT YOU DONT
  • INSPECT
  • Peter Senge

13
PRIMARY TASK Improve WHAT and HOW we teach
  • I. REPLACE IMPROVEMENT PLANNING WITH
    TEAM-BASED EFFORTS TO IMPROVE
  • WHAT IS TAUGHT and HOW WELL
  • II. GUARANTEED VIABLE CURRICULUM (WHAT)
  • III. SIMPLIFY LEADERSHIP
  • IV. RADICALLY REDEFINE
  • LITERACY INSTRUCTION

14
I. FIRST TYPICAL STRATEGIC or IMPROVEMENT
PLANNING MODELS
  • SUCK
  • organizations into
  • superficial time-consuming
  • counterproductive, distracting
  • actions that PREVENT
  • rapid, team-based cycles of instruction?
    assessment ? improvement of instruction

15
I. LEARNING COMMUNITIES AN ASTONISHING
CONCURRENCE
  • The most promising strategy for sustained,
    substantive school improvement is building the
    capacity of school personnel to function as a
    professional learning community.
  • Milbrey McLaughlin (cited in Professional
    Learning Communities at Work by Dufour and
    Eaker)

16
I. LEARNING COMMUNITIES AN ASTONISHING
CONCURRENCE
  • Professionals do not work alone they work in
    teams to accomplish the goalto heal the
    patient, win the lawsuit, plan the building.
  • Arthur Wise Teaching Teams a 21st Century
    Paradigm For Organizing Americas Schools

17
I. FIRST ADOPT SIMPLE PLANS to create
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
  • 1. DATA - driven (academic!) priorities
  • 2. GOALS that are measurable/tied to an
    assessment
  • 3. TEAMWORK that produces short-term assessment
    results
  • Anchored by a
  • GUARANTEED VIABLE CURRICULUM

18
DATA S.M.A.R.T. GOALS
  • 1. SET measurable, annual goals for
  • Math Art Writing P.E.tied to an
    ASSESSMENT
  • GOAL Our team will improve in
  • (Physics Math Writing French )
  • from 62 (2007)
  • to 66 (2008)
  • Peter Senge More than ? goals is the
    same as none at all.

19
DATA DRIVEN PRIORITIES
  • 2. IDENTIFY lowest - scoring standardsfrom
    ASSESSMENTS
  • MATH measurement operations with negative and
    positive integers
  • WRITING voice word choice
  • P.E. volleyball unit personal health plan
  • maim your opponent in dodge ball
  • 3. USE formative assessment data
  • (results from lessons, units, etc)
  • Stiggins Wiliam Black

20
AUTHENTIC TEAM-BASED PLCs plan lesson/unit?
teach it? assess its impact?adjust instruction
  • Amphi High Thesis statement/introduction
  • Adlai Stevenson Physics how a rainbow works
  • Lake Havasu High School Operations with negative
    positive integers

21
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES FACTS
  • The PLC concept (by whatever name) is
    indisputably the
  • STATE OF THE ART for improving instruction but
    alas
  • authentic, team-based PLCs are EXCEEDINGLY
    RARE.

22
II. GUARANTEED VIABLE CURRICULUM
  • How important is this?
  • The NUMBER ONE FACTOR
  • for increasing levels of learning
  • Marzano Porter Lezotte

23
II. GUARANTEED?
  • Do Americas schools now ensure that a
    guaranteed viable curriculum actually gets
    taught?

24
II. GUARANTEED VIABLE CURRICULUM?
BRUTAL FACTS
  • ROSENHOLTZ teachers provide a
  • self-selected jumble of standards
  • BERLINER/WALBERG wild variation from teacher to
    teacher no alignment with agreed-upon, viable
    curriculum standards
  • LITTLE SIZER ALLINGTON CALKINS
  • curricular chaos" in English language arts

25
II. GUARANTEED CURRICULUM
MAP the STANDARDS
  • 1st quarter NUMBER SENSE
  • DATA ANALYSIS PROBABILITY
  • 2ND quarter PATTERNS, ALGEBRA FUNCTIONS
  • GEOMETRY
  • 3rd quarter MEASUREMENT DISCRETE MATH
  • MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURE/LOGIC
  • 4th quarter REVIEW for YEAR END ASSESSMENT
  • END OF EACH QUARTER common assessmentwith
    ample higher-order component (analysis,
    evaluation etc.)

26
III. LEADERSHIP in theProfessional Learning
Community
  • No institution can survive if it needs geniuses
    or supermen to manage it. It must be organized
    to get along under a leadership of average human
    beings.
  • Peter Drucker

27
THE LEADERSHIP ILLUSION
  • The actions of administrators, including all
    forms of improvement planning staff
    development, have virtually no impact on the
    quality of teaching in the school.
  • Richard Elmore 2000
  • This is not a matter of work ethic
  • it is a matter of misplaced priorities.

28
MONITORING 1. INSTRUCTION and 2. GUARANTEED
VIABLE CURRICULUM
  • LEADERS (administrators, dept. heads) must
  • 1. Conduct at least one unannounced classroom
    walk-through each month, looking for schoolwide
    patterns of strength/weakness with regard to
  • Clear focus on essential standards
  • College prep critical reasoning/higher-order
    reading, writing, thinking
  • Essential elements of an effective lesson
  • September 4 of 15 classes teaching essential
    standards
  • October __ of 15 classes (SMART goal)

29
MONITORING 1. INSTRUCTION and 2. GUARANTEED
VIABLE CURRICULUM
  • If you can not measure it, you cannot improve
    it.
  • British scientist Lord Kelvin

30
LEADERSHIP Team Management for GUARANTEED
VIABLE CURRICULUM (D. Reeves R. Marzano R.
DuFour)
  • QUARTERLY CURRICULUM REVIEW Leaders Teams
    discuss
  • quarterly assessments (success rate areas of
    strength/weakness)
  • grade books (lowest-scoring assessments)
  • scored work samples (weak/strong areas)
  • IS THIS A FAIR, REASONABLE REQUIREMENT?

31
(No Transcript)
32
MEETINGS STRATEGIZE TO ACHIEVE to
RECOGNIZE/CELEBRATE every SMALL WIN
  • ____ of 6 elementary teams developed team
    meeting protocols
  • ____ of 28 middle school teams completed
    standards map(s)
  • ____ of our 25 course-alike teams have created a
    SUCCESSFUL LESSON (e.g. 87 mastery/proficiency)
  • MARCH 6 of 15 classroomsessential standard
    being taught
  • APRIL 13 of 15 classroomsessential standard
    being taught
  • NO SMALL WINS NO PROGRESS

33
RECOGNIZE CELEBRATE measurable SMALL WINS to
overcome resistance promote MOMENTUM
  • The 1 LEVER FOR IMPROVING MORALE AND EFFECTIVE
    PRACTICE
  • Nelson Blasé and Kirby
  • The single best, low cost, high- leverage way to
    improve performance, morale, and the climate for
    change is to dramatically increase the levels of
    meaningful recognition for educators
  • Robert Evans

34
RESULTS of Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum
Effective Teamwork Frequent Recognition
Celebration
  • ADLAI STEVENSON HIGH SCHOOL
  • 10 years of record-breaking gains on every
    national, state end-of-course assessment
  • 800 increase in AP success
  • Average ACT score 21 to 25

35
IV. UNPARALELLED OPPORTUNITY LITERACY
INSTRUCTION
  • Under-developed literacy skills are the number
    one reason why students are retained, assigned to
    special education, given long-term remedial
    services and why they fail to graduate from high
    school.
  • Ferrandino and Tirozzi presidents of NAESP
    and NASSP

36
BRUTAL FACTS GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY
  • Reading and Writing vs. stuff ratio
  • Lucy Calkins 1/15 reading to stuff ratio
  • Literature based Arts and Crafts
  • dioramas game boards worksheets posters
    presentations coats-of-arms mobiles movies
    cutting, pasting designing book jackets skits
    collages

37
The CRAYOLA CURRICULUM
  • I can only summarize the findings by saying
    that weve been stunned
  • kids are given more coloring assignments than
    mathematics and writing assignments
  • I want to repeat that, because Im not joking,
    nor am I exaggerating.
  • Katie Haycock

38
HIGH SCHOOL English
  • 9th grade To Kill A Mockingbird (100 points
    total)
  • Draw head or full body shot of any
    characteruse crayons, colored pencils (20
    points)
  • Create a model of Maycomb (wood, plastic or
    styrefoam) (20 points)

39
HIGH SCHOOL English
  • Honors Sophomore English
  • Two schoolscollage as 6-week assessment of
    literary unit
  • Frankenstein assessment make a mobile or
    collage
  • Siddhartha Assessment
  • 8-pages of worksheets (96 questions)
  • ¾ of an inch of space to answer each question
  • NO DISCUSSION OR WRITING

40
HIGH SCHOOL English
  • AP Literature Memories Scrapbook (200 points)
  • Second-semester project
  • For each page of text no criteria for quality of
    written work draw illustration (using various
    media)

41
LITERARY TERMS essential?
indirect characterization direct characterization static character internal conflict external conflict rising action omniscient point of view third-person limited point of view complication foreshadowing suspense resolution climax plot anadiplosis chiasmus synecdoche
42
A BETTER WAY READ, WRITE and TALK
  • After close reading of innumerable books and
    articles, students
  • wrote and talked,
  • wrote and talked
  • their way toward understanding.
  • Mike Rose Lives on the Boundary

43
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
DISCUSSION PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • Draw inferences and conclusions
  • Analyze conflicting source documents
  • Solve complex problems with no obvious answer
  • (Prepare students to) Write multiple 3-5-page
    papers supporting arguments with evidence
  • Read far more books, articles essays than they
    now read in high school in class!
  • College Knowledge by David Conley

44
WRITING IMPORTANT?
  • Writing is the litmus paper of thought the very
    CENTER OF SCHOOLING
  • Ted Sizer
  • Writing aids in cognitive development to such an
    extent that the upper reaches of Blooms taxonomy
    could not be reached without the use of some form
    of writing .
  • Kurt and Farris 1990

45
BRUTAL FACTS
  • Writing is rarely assigned, even more rarely
    taught.
  • William Zinsser National Commission on
    Writing
  • Even U.S. students best writing is mediocre.
  • NAEP report on best US high school writing
  • Students with 3.8 GPAs, in highly selective
    colleges, write poorly.
  • NAEP writing Study

46
BRUTAL FACTS
  • If we could institute only one change to make
    students more college ready, it should be to
    increase the amount and quality of writing
    students are expected to produce.
  • David Conley
  • author of College Knowledge

47
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • SIMPLE STEPS? MAJOR REVOLUTION
  • Who would make a better friend
  • Spider or Turtle?
  • Old Dan or Little Anne which admire most?
  • What do you think are the most important lessons
    of WWI?
  • Evaluate for most/least effective, significant
    interesting--presidents explorers scientists
    etc.

48
SIMPLE STEPS ? MAJOR REVOLUTION EACH QUARTER
  • DEVELOP ARGUMENTS/PROPOSALS
  • SCIENCE
  • PRO/CON Drill in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
  • Environmental sustainability
  • HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES
  • Illegal Immigration Middle East issue(s)
  • Evaluation of two presidents
  • Case for liberal/conservative policy/politics

49
THE OPPORTUNITY
  • We dont know the half of what these kids can
    do Ted Sizer
  • We now have 100/100/100 schools every kid poor
    and minority, and every one of them meeting
    standards including 100 of special education
    kids (the typical average is about 15) Doug
    Reeves/e-mail

50
FOR SWIFT, DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENT, FOCUS ON
  • TEAM-BASED PLCs (WHAT HOW)
  • GUARANTEED VIABLE Curriculum
  • RADICAL changes to literacy instruction
  • CELEBRATE every SMALL WIN in these areas at
    EVERY faculty admin. meeting
  • WHY? 35-50 percentile gain in
  • THREE YEARS (Marzano Sanders Bracey)

51
  • Instruction is the pivotal factor, but it is not
    nearly what it should be
  • It is not adequately supervised
  • Training has limited impact on instruction
  • Underachievement, droputs etc are largely the
    result of the fact that poor and mediocre
    teaching are manifestly, almost universally
    tolerated

52
  • TEAMS OF TEACHERS Solution build, share
    questions and detailed, scaffolded lessons,
    i.e. read to answer an interesting question,
    underline, annotate or take notes share with
    partner while teacher walks around write own
    conclusions with support/quotations from
    textetc.

53
THE OPPORTUNITY
  • The question is not,
  • Is it possible to educate all children well?
    But rather
  • Do we want to do it badly enough?
  • Deborah Meier

54
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • Drawing inferences Interpreting results
    Analyzing conflicting source documents
    Supporting their arguments with evidence
  • Solving complex problems that have no obvious
    answer
  • Drawing conclusions Offering explanations
    Conducting research Writing multiple 3-5-page
    papers that are well reasoned, well organized,
    and provide evidence from credible sources
    Thinking deeply about what they are being taught
  • Reading 8-9 books in the same amount of time they
    read one in high school Working with other
    students on complex problems and projects Making
    presentations and explaining what they have
    learned

55
BUT ALAS.
  • HILLOCKS time spent actually teaching
    instructing per assignment
  • 3 minutes (mostly directions vs. scaffolded
    lesson with checks for understanding using
    rubric/critieria models to teach word choice
    voice how to build a clear, effective paragraph
    using support from one or more texts etc.)
  • NESS 40 hours of classroom observations
  • 3 of time devoted to teaching explaining,
    modelling reading strategies
  • mostly asking literal questions. Is this
    something new?
  • FORD OPITZ 2/3 of classtime

56
BASIC ELEMENTS of PLCs
  • Common curriculum standards taught in roughly
    common sequence (standards/consensus maps)
  • Common assessments (starting with quarterly)
  • Course-alike TEAMS use dataroutinely--to improve
    standards-based lessons units to reach
  • S.M.A.R.T. Goals (BIO 76 in 07--gt 80 in 08)
  • Continuous Recognition and Celebration of SMALL
    WINS toward achieving SMART Goals

57
IMPORTANT?
  • Protocols
  • of teams/schools now who have developed/are
    using them
  • Standards maps
  • of courses for which they have been developed
  • If we dont know how many/which ones, we cant
    improve or increase

58
II. GUARANTEED VIABLE CURRICULUM?
  • In pairs Come up with some simple ideas for
    ensuring a (more) guaranteed and viable
    curriculum. Points for
  • Simple
  • Time-efficient
  • You have 1 minute

59
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • Only 31 of college graduates can read a complex
    book and extrapolate from it
  • National Center for Education Statistics
  • Only 24 write at the proficient level 4 were
    rated high
  • NAEP study

60
High leverage silver bullets
  • Planning backwardfrom stds based assessment ask
    Tim Kanold _at_ assessment swaps
  • Walkthroughs and reports/expectation
  • Quarterly assessments/to ensure g and v and
    continuous improvement

61
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • Fully 2/3 of students at a prestigious university
    couldnt detect the most flagrant contradictions
    in a text that was purposely laced with them
    (Graff).
  • K-12 does very little to enhance students
    critical reading capacities
  • (Graf, p. 68).
  • BUT WHAT ABOUT WRITING?

62
WHY WAIT? These facts DEMAND ACTION
  • We should not have to wait another generation
    before we get things right
  • Reverend Michael Pfleger, youth pastor in
    inner-city Chicago
  • We Learn Best by Doing
  • DuFour, DuFour, Eaker and Many

63
II. GUARANTEED VIABLE CURRICULUM
  • The key factor is that teachers know what needs
    to be taught at each grade level that there is
    a coherent curriculum.
  • Study of 15 very high-achievingbut
    disadvantaged--schools
  • Karin Chenoweth Harvard Education Letter
    May/June 2007

64
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions
  • Interpreting results
  • Analyzing conflicting source documents
  • Supporting their arguments with evidence
  • Solving complex problems that have no obvious
    answer
  • Drawing conclusions
  • Offering explanations
  • Conducting research
  • Writing multiple 3-5-page papers that are well
    reasoned
  • Thinking deeply about what they are being taught
  • Reading 8-9 books in the same amount of time they
    read one in high school

65
WE ARE WHAT WE DO what we CONSISTENTLY,
FREQUENTLY, REPEATEDLY
  • Tolerate--or ignore
  • Talk about
  • Ask for or REQUIRE
  • Formally Evaluate
  • Insist on
  • Reward, praise and reinforce
  • WEEK IN, WEEK OUT

66
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • READING Only 31 of college graduates can read a
    complex book and extrapolate from it
  • National Center for Education Statistics
  • WRITING Only 24 write at the proficient
    level 4 were rated high
  • NAEP study

67
THE PRICE OF BETTER SCHOOLS
  • Perhaps there are schools that have made the
    transition to a professional learning community
    without conflict or anxiety, but I am unaware of
    anythe question schools must face is how will
    we react when we are immersed in the conflict
    that accompanies significant change?
  • Rick DuFour

68
K-12/COLLEGE/CAREER SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • The information age places higher-order literacy
    demands on all of us ...these demands include
    synthesizing and evaluating information from
    multiple sources.
  • Richard Allington

69
THE IMPACT OF EFFECTIVE TEACHING ON ACHIEVEMENT
  • SHORT-TERM
  • Success on same assessment 72 vs. 27
  • 3 years of good teaching 35-50
  • Impact on achievement 6-10 times as much as all
    other factors combined
  • LONG-TERM (IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS?)
  • Graduation rate from 68 to 80?
  • Average college graduation rate 50 to 80?
  • LOW -SES college grad rate from 7 to 30?

70
K-12/COLLEGE SUCCESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • 2/3 of students at a prestigious university
    couldnt detect flagrant contradictions in a text
    that was purposely laced with them (Graff).
  • "K-12 does very little to enhance students
    critical reading capacities
  • (Graff, p. 68).
  • BUT WHAT ABOUT WRITING?

71
REALLY? Already know?
  • TRANSPARENCY/CLASSROOM ACCESS
  • Reasonably well-constructed lessons, units
    aligned with assessments
  • Professional Learning Communitiesfocused on
    ever-improving assessment results
  • Measurable goals
  • Monitoring of what is taught/how well/1/4ly
    curriculum reviews
  • Overhaul of literacy education (English Beyond)
  • NEW
  • Team management for small wins
  • Recognition celebration

72
PRESSURE AND SUPPORT
  • Sure, but there isnt a word here about the
    incentives and punishments needed to make
    teachers and schools want to have results!
  • Peter Drucker, in a note to me
  • During the transition, people may be sad,
    angry, depressed, irrational, frightened or
    confused. We must, without judgment, provide
    processes for them to express feelings
    Robert Garmstron

73
OPPORTUNITIES
  • Standard not clear/not on board
  • Too many goals (not tied to an assessment of
    mastery)
  • Almost no check for understanding/scaffoldoing
  • Minimal (purposeful) reading and writing (using a
    rubric)
  • Abundance of low-quality, misaligned worksheets
  • Hands raised
  • Activity/worksheet driven curriculum vs.
    stds./assemt-driven

74
YOU CANT IMPROVE WHAT YOU CANT SEE
  • The reason schools arent vastly better, for
    smart or poor or advantaged or disadvantaged
    students is because
  • The administrative superstructure of schools
    exists to buffer teaching from outside
    inspection, interference or disruption.
  • Richard Elmore

75
Team Lesson/Unit Logs
  • SPECIFIC STANDARD (e.g. descriptive settings)
  • SHORT-TERM ASSESSMENT (what must students
    know/do?) e.g. write a quality descriptive
    paragraph
  • LESSON/UNIT/DETAILED STRATEGY (not a list or
    grab- bag of strategies)
  • SHORT-TERM ASSESSMENT RESULT
  • (e.g. 74 demonstrated proficiency/progress)
  • ADJUSTMENTS BASED ON SHORT-TERM RESULTS

76
ASSESSMENT the coherence maker (Michael
Fullan)
  • TEAMS must work to ensure that assessments are
  • ALIGNED to state/district assessments
  • FREQUENT
  • FORMATIVE -- used to inform improvement of
    subsequent lessons
  • CLEAR CRITERIA is given in advance
  • INTELLECTUALLY-ENGAGING

77
TEACHER EVALUATION IS NOT MONITORING
INSTRUCTION
  • No pressure no support for
  • quality of instruction or assessment
  • guaranteed and viable curriculum
  • Teacher evaluation generally
  • reinforces poor/mediocre practice
  • Kim Marshall

78
THE GREATEST OPPORTUNITY OF ALL LITERACY
INSTRUCTION
  • What minimum percentage of classtime in English
    or Language Arts should be devoted to actual
    reading and writing?

79
COLLEGE READINESS ANALYTICAL READING
ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING
  • Only about one in five college students has
    adequately developed these capacities the rest
    either
  • drop out of college
  • have fewer academic and career options
  • struggle in/dont optimally benefit from college
    studies or
  • dont qualify for/succeed in grad school
  • Graf Conley Housman Barzun

80
  • Meier
  • You can observe a lot just by watching." Yogi
    Berra
  • Tear down this wall

81
  • System what we do but, more important what we
    do as a result of what we reinforce, encourage,
    talk about a lot, insist on consistently demand,
    require celebrate, promote for praise plead,
    repeat get excited about punish .these are
    the things that will get priority
  • END of sections? Cd we change? Forget
    principles/theoriesHow, concretely,
    realistically?

82
  • What do if 35-50 pts on the line?
  • System pretty good at responding to torrnet of
    stuff, at satisfying bureacruaccy---but cod we
    re-jiegger ita bitto foucs sufficiently on
    instr levers? I will try veryy hard ot be
    realisitic, not pie in the sky

83
Accountability
  • Culture is a function of what a system
  • Celebrates
  • Gets angry at
  • Reminds
  • Excited about
  • reinforces praises
  • Punishes
  • Insists on demands
  • Ignores spends time on

84
BRUTAL FACTS
  • At a time when Americans seek strength in
    their leaders, we should find the strength to
    speak hard truths about our schools.
  • Robert Gordon, education adviser to John Kerry
  • We must overcome the awful inertia of past
    decades Michael Fullan
  • Improvement will require recognition of and
    moral outrage at ineffective practices.
  • Roland Barth

85
IV. LITERACY BRUTAL FACTS
  • Only 38 of students READ at the proficient
    level(i.e. can analyze interpret)
  • Only 24 of students WRITE at the proficient
    level
  • Their importancein every discipline--is greatly
    underestimated

86
COLLEGE READINESS ANALYTICAL READING
ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING
  • NON FICTION How has geography influenced
    Japans history, culture and character?
  • The CASE FOR/AGAINST
  • ANWR drilling
  • The South in the Civil War
  • Wartime use of torture Andrew Sullivan vs.
    Charles Krauthammer
  • WAL-MART George F. Will vs. Stacy Mitchell

87
I. LEARNING COMMUNITIES AN ASTONISHING
CONCURRENCE
Michael Fullan Linda Darling Hammond Milbrey
McLaughlin Rick Stiggins Tom Peters Peter
Senge Karen Eastwood Dennis Sparks Susan
Rosenholtz DuFour, DuFour Eaker Judith
Little W.Edwards Deming Richard Elmore
Doug Reeves Roland Barth Robert Redford

88
THE KNOWING-DOING GAP
  • Its not that we dont know what to do
  • Its that we DONT DO what we
  • ALREADY KNOW
  • Pfeffer Sutton

89
THE KNOWING-DOING GAP
  • Its not that we dont know what to do
  • Its that we DONT DO what we
  • ALREADY KNOW
  • Pfeffer Sutton

90
THE OPPORTUNITY
  • The question is not Is it possible to educate
    all children well? But rather
  • DO WE WANT TO DO IT BADLY ENOUGH?
  • Deborah Meier

91
RESULTS PLCs/ Guaranteed Viable Curriculum
  • LEVEY MIDDLE SCHOOL average 24-point gains at
    every grade levelin 2 years
  • BESSEMER ELEMENTARY 85 poor/minority
  • Reading 2 to 48
  • Writing 12 to 64
  • BRAZOSPORT, TX from worst to best in state
  • BYRON-BERGSON S.D. 57 to 81
  • SELAH S.D. 27 point district-wide gains

92
Team Lesson/Unit Logs
  • SPECIFIC STANDARD (e.g. descriptive settings)
  • SHORT-TERM ASSESSMENT (what must students
    know/do?) e.g. write a quality descriptive
    paragraph
  • LESSON/UNIT/DETAILED STRATEGY (not a list or
    grab- bag of strategies)
  • SHORT-TERM ASSESSMENT RESULT
  • (e.g. 74 demonstrated proficiency/progress)
  • ADJUSTMENTS BASED ON SHORT-TERM RESULTS

93
COLLEGE READINESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • NAEP So few examples of persuasive writing were
    submitted that they couldnt even analyze the
    samples usefully
  • Lynn Olson
  • Doug Reeves 90 of writing assignments in K-12
    N_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ mode

94
II. GUARANTEED CURRICULUM GEOMETRY
2nd Quarter
  • Visualize draw 2 3 dimensional geometric
    figures
  • Apply congruence, similarity, angle measure,
    parallelism perpendicularity to real situations
  • Perform elementary transformations
    (tessellations, flips and slides)
  • Solve problems relating to size, shape, area
    volume
  • AIMS Assessment Guide teachers admit that
    they dont consult these guides

95
LEADERSHIP We are what we talk about
  • DISTRICT 2, NEW YORK CITY
  • Faculty and central office meetings are about
    instruction and only about instruction
  • from 16 to 2 in academic rank
  • in only two years

96
COLLEGE/CAREER READINESS ANALYTICAL READING
PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • AIMS/SAT/AP/COLLEGE/CAREER SUCCESS
  • Close, analytical reading to evaluate logic
    cause effect compare contrast accuracy
    authors intent/bias fact or opinion etc.
  • PERSUASIVE, purposeful writing analyses
    interpretations grant/policy proposals
    recommended actions
  • Are these critical reasoning capacities
    cultivated in the K-12 curriculum?

97
BRUTAL FACTS
  • Effective teaching is quite different from the
    teaching that is typically found in most
    classrooms
  • Odden Kelley
  • Ineffective practices were almost as prevalent in
    affluent, high-scoring schools as in
    disadvantaged, low-scoring schools
  • Learning 24/7 Classroom Study Elmore

98
I. FIRST ABANDON CURRENT STRATEGIC or
IMPROVEMENT PLANNING MODELS
  • BRUTAL FACT Strategic Planning etc.common,
    but ineffective
  • Dennis Sparks Gary Hamel, Doug Reeves, Tom
    Peters Bill Cook Henry Mintzberg Michael
    Fullan Kouzes Posner Bruce Joyce Pfeffer
    Sutton Penn Teller
  • Tipping Point Phi Delta Kappan February
    2004

99
EXAMPLE OF A TIMELINE FOR TEAM PRODUCTS
  • By the end of the
  • 2nd week Team Norms
  • 4th week Common SMART Goal
  • 6th Week Common Outcomes
  • 8th Week Common Assessments
  • 10th Week Analysis of Student Performance on
    assessments
  • DuFour, DuFour and Eaker

100
TEAMWORK BRUTAL FACTS
  • Real teamworkthe heart of PLCs--is the
    unquestioned state of the art for improving
    levels of learning, but..
  • It is exceedingly rare in schools unsupervised
    isolation is the norm

101
TEAMWORK ESSENTIAL
  • A PLC is composed of collaborative teams whose
    members work interdependently to achieve common
    goals linked to the purpose of learning for all.
    The team is the engine that drives the PLC
    effort.
  • Learning by Doing p. 3
  • DuFour, DuFour, Eaker and Many
  • BUT ALAS

102
TEAMWORK ESSENTIAL
  • A PLC is composed of collaborative teams whose
    members work interdependently to achieve common
    goals linked to the purpose of learning for all.
    The team is the engine that drives the PLC
    effort.
  • Learning by Doing p. 3
  • DuFour, DuFour, Eaker and Many
  • BUT ALAS

103
  • Huxley
  • Every man who knows how to red has it inhis power
    to maginify himself, to multiply the ways in
    which he exists, to make his life full,
    significant and interesting
  • 24...
  • Barzun
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