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The Building Blocks of District Site Leadership Teams

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RSDSS, Region 2 Staff – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The Building Blocks of District Site Leadership Teams


1
The Building Blocks of District Site Leadership
Teams
  • RSDSS, Region 2 Staff

2
Learning Objectives
  • At the end of this session you will be able to
  • Understand the purpose of a District Site
    Leadership Team (DSLT)
  • Recognize the building blocks for establishing a
    DSLT
  • Identify the major responsibilities of a DSLT

3
Why should you have a DSLT?
PURPOSE
4
DSLT Purpose
  • Identifies priorities to support site leadership
    teams by promoting funding, visibility and
    political support for school improvement
    initiatives
  • Advises and supports development, implementation
    and monitoring of the LEA Plan
  • Communicates district priorities to all
    stakeholders

5
District Leadership Makes a Difference!
  • A direct correlation exits between district
    leadership and student achievement.
  • Findings suggest that district leadership has a
    measurable effect on student achievement.
  • (Marzano and Waters 2009)

6
  • More collegiality wont cut it. Even
    discussions about curricular issues or popular
    strategies can feel good but go nowhere. The
    right image to embrace is a group of teachers who
    meet regularly to share, refine and assess the
    impact of lessons and strategies continuously to
    help increasing numbers of students learn at
    higher levels.
  • M. Schmoker, Results Now, 2006, p. 178

7
Where To BeginBuilding Blocks
  • Have the right structure and people
  • Establish norms
  • Have a common process
  • Periodically self-evaluate
  • Have the right tools and data authentic work

8
STRUCTURE
9
Structure Collaborative Teams
10
Structure
  • District Leadership Teams Varies.
  • Either all or a representative sample of
    administrators and teacher leaders from all
    grade spans, including special services and EL
  • May include a representative of the teachers
    union/association
  • Site Leadership Teams
  • Composed of teacher and administrative leadership
    of a building.
  • Many times the teachers are the chairs of
    departments or the leaders of Instructional Data
    Teams.
  • Instructional Leadership Teams
  • Grade level or discipline-based teams
  • Includes all primary instructional providers
  • Administrative representation, as needed

11
Membership
  • Other
  • Superintendents Cabinet
  • Academic coach(es)
  • Counseling staff
  • Student services representative
  • EL/migrant representative
  • Special Education Director

District Leadership Team
12
Member Characteristics
  • Strong people
  • Those who hold a large vision, but understand
    details
  • Ability to coalesce into a team
  • Effective group participation skills
  • Skeptic vs. Blocker
  • Skeptic Demands the team think clearly,
    Identifies issues other team members might not
    consider, Reflects a point of view shared by
    others
  • Blocker Seeks control, Requires constant
    attention,Retards the process of the team
  • Source B. McKeever, Nine Lessons of Effective
    School Leadership Teams, 2003

13
Membership Blockers/Skeptics
  • Source B. McKeever, Nine Lessons of Effective
    School Leadership Teams, 2003

14
NORMS
15
Norms or Characteristics
  • Independent of the level of collaboration, all
    teams should practice certain norms or
    characteristics
  • Accountable to colleagues
  • Support colleagues
  • On time for meetings
  • Support team decisions
  • Positive, Reliable, Prepared
  • Participate fully in meetings
  • Believe all students can learn
  • The Leadership and Learning Center
    http//www.leadandlearn.com/

16
  • When individuals work through a process to
    create explicitly stated norms, and then commit
    to honor those norms, they increase the
    likelihood they will begin to function as a
    collaborative team rather than as a loose
    collection of people working together.
  • Learning By Doing, p. 103

17
Types of Norms
  • Behavioral
  • Process

18
Sample Behavioral Norms
  • A commitment to developing skills that help us
    work effectively with others
  • Communication Listening Conflict
    Resolution Participation
  • A commitment to increasing our level of awareness
    with regard to potential areas of improvement.
  • A commitment to a full, honest, and transparent
    accounting of the current state of affairs at our
    site/district.
  • An awareness of our own behaviors and work-style
    preferences and their impact on others, so we can
    adjust our behaviors and help the group address
    the needs of all team members.
  • A willingness to share our background and
    experiences.
  • A willingness to work together for a common
    purpose continuous school improvement.
  • A commitment to a positive perspective, letting
    go of excuses and moving toward solutions.
  • A commitment to share hope and passion for
    improvement.

19
Sample Process Norms Burney High School
  • Process
  • Agendas yes. Partially based on district
    leadership team agendas. Monitoring school goals
    and WASC status. Facilitator prepares. Started
    at end of the previous meeting.
  • Facilitation rotated.
  • Decision making consensus (all can live with
    and support the decision)
  • Minutes Prior meeting facilitator does
    minutes. Distributed to staff within one week
    by email (hard copy to boxes), previewed first by
    SLT three school days after the meeting by email
  • Communication facilitator does so at the staff
    meeting

20
COMMON PROCESS
  • Meeting Structure and Expectations

21
Process Results Oriented
  • Structured
  • Review of data
  • Focus on LEA Plan, priorities, and goals
  • Scheduled
  • Suggested monthly, at least quarterly

22
Process Common Understandings
  • DSLT members must share common understanding of
    the critical areas of focus (e.g. intervention,
    full implementation, English-Language Development
    ELD) and current reality.
  • Understandings must be consistent with the
    California Content Frameworks.
  • Common understandings assist the DSLT in
    developing consistent district actions to support
    the critical areas of focus.

23
Process Clear Roles
Facilitator Guides the discussion of the group. Prepares the agenda.
Time Keeper Reminds team of time remaining. Follows timeframes on the agenda.
Note Taker Takes notes for the team. Distributes notes to the team.
Task Monitor Keeps the team on course. Refocuses. Reminds team of tasks and purposes, as needed.
Participant Is engaged. Listens. Questions. Contributes. Commits.
Other?
24
  • The research finds that organizations that are
    successful in continuous improvement have made
    continuous improvement a defining element of
    their cultures, their identities, and their
    goals..While maintaining consistency with the
    core values and identity of the organization, one
    accomplishment leads to another the work is
    never done.
  • M. Smylie, Continuous School Improvement, 2010,
    p. 89

25
MAJOR FOCUS OF DSLT WORK
26
The Major Focus
  • A district leadership teams major focus is to
    build the capacity of district staff to
    participate in a continuous improvement planning
    process. The focus of this process is on student
    achievement and creating cultural norms to
    support it.

27
The Continuous Improvement Planning Process
  • The following phases help to develop the
    knowledge and skills necessary for continuous
    improvement
  • Readiness
  • Taking Stock
  • Goal setting
  • Research and action plan
  • Implementation
  • Monitoring
  • Recommending changes, as necessary

28
READINESS
29
Create a Supportive District Culture
  • Leadership teams can change the culture of their
    district by engaging in a continuous improvement
    planning process. Teams can influence
    organizational culture.

30
Organizational Level of Intervention in District
Culture
Environment
Activities and Behaviors Skills Competencies
Beliefs and Values Identity
Surface Structures Action (Target of Most
Professional Development Deep Structures
31
TAKING STOCK
31
32
Conduct Needs Assessment
  • Organize and present data for the needs
    assessment
  • Review and analyze data to identify priority
    areas of focus
  • Identify priority areas of focus

33
DATA
  • Include
  • At least three years of data
  • Data disaggregated by student subgroups, as well
    as whole district
  • Data by district, school, course, and grade span
  • Comparative data including schools, district,
    county and state, including similar school
    comparisons
  • Local context data

34
Some Types of Student Data
  • AYP API
  • STAR
  • CAHSEE
  • CELDT
  • Local Diagnostic Assessments
  • Local Benchmark Assessments
  • Dropout rates / Graduation rate
  • Demographics
  • Suspensions/Expulsions

35
STATE SURVEYS
  • Academic Program Survey (APS)
  • District Assessment Survey (DAS)
  • English Learner Subgroup Self-Assessment (ELLSA)
  • Inventory for Support and Services for Students
    with Disabilities (ISS)

36
Review and Analyze Data to Identify Priority Areas
  • Use student achievement data to identify
    underperforming student groups
  • Use state program evaluation tools to evaluate
    the LEAs instructional program.

37
A Framework for Coherence
37
38
GOAL SETTING AND ACTION PLANNING
38
39
  • Using needs assessment data to identify areas of
    greatest need SMART goals
  • Use the goal setting process to set goals that
    align with the LEA Plan
  • Develop goals that focus on student achievement
    and classroom instruction
  • Communicate expectations to stakeholders

40
Tight Loose Leadership
  • We need to be tight about
  • Research based effective practices that have high
    correlation to improved results
  • Ensuring goals are enacted at every school
  • Administrators explicit and implicit support

41
Nonnegotiables
  • Focus on Learning
  • Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum
  • Balanced and Coherent System of Assessments
  • System Wide Intervention System
  • Focus on Collaboration
  • Shared Mission, Vision, Values/Commitments, and
    Goals
  • High Performing, Collaborative Teams
  • Intentional Collaboration
  • Focus on Results
  • Data Mindset Efficacy and Transparency
  • Data Management, Collection and Analysis
  • Responsibilities for Actions to Improve Results

42
Action Planning Learning
  • Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum materials
    adoption training
  • Balanced and Coherent System of Assessments
    benchmarks assessments
  • System Wide Intervention System criteria for
    entry and exit

43
Action Planning Collaboration
  • Shared Mission, Vision, Values/Commitments, and
    Goals develop common agreements
  • High Performing, Collaborative Teams Team norms
    and protocols
  • Intentional Collaboration - Calendar for
    collaboration

44
Action Planning Results
  • Data Mindset Efficacy and Transparency Data
    dashboards
  • Data Management, Collection and Analysis -
    establishing a system with measures of
    effectiveness
  • Responsibilities for Actions to Improve Results
    - Action research

45
Action Plan Nuts and Bolts
  • What?
  • Who?
  • When?
  • Funding?
  • Progress Monitoring?

46
About Resouces
Use of resources that align with and support
instruction and achievement goals
46
47
Resources
  • Time
  • Money
  • Personnel
  • Professional Learning
  • Materials

48
IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING
48
49
  • Several new research studies provide clear
    evidence that when it comes to achievement and
    equity, planning and processes are less important
    than implementation, execution, and monitoring.
  • Douglas Reeves
  • (The Learning
    Leader, 2006)

50
  • Implementation
  • Progress on goals and action steps
  • Accountability for timeline
  • Effectiveness
  • Measure as demonstrated through student
    achievement

50
51

  • Implementation
  • for the action steps
  • for the district instructional program
  • Possible methods
  • Annually evaluating principals
  • Classroom visits and instructional observations

52
  • Effectiveness
  • As demonstrated through student achievement
  • Is there a student achievement monitoring system
  • Are learning needs of special populations being
    met?
  • Is there a system in place to quickly identify
    when the learning needs are being met?

53
Making Revisions
  • Build in a process to revise the plan based on
    monitoring progress of the plan and student
    results

53
54
Communications
  • Results become the topic of regular meetings
  • Celebrate progress
  • Keep stakeholders informed
  • Parent newsletters
  • District Committees
  • Superintendent emails to staff
  • Regular reports to the Board

54
55
SELF- EVALUATE
56
Self Evaluation Questions
Dimension Key Questions
Relationship Do team members feel supported? Do team members trust each other? Do team members feel valued?
Process Is the process clear and logical? Is the process efficient? Is the process appropriate for the task?
Results Are the results of high quality? Are the results timely? Do the results meet the expectations we established?
57
Self-evaluation
  • Are we building a collaborative culture?
  • Trust
  • Student centered
  • A listening atmosphere
  • Concern about add-on programs
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