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Strategic Employee Motivation and Creating Productive Work Environments

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Title: Strategic Employee Motivation and Creating Productive Work Environments


1
Strategic Human Capital Leadership
Strategic Employee Motivation and Creating
Productive Work Environments
2
Introduction
  • Jonathan H. Westover, Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Management, Woodbury
    School of Business
  • Email jon.westover_at_gmail.com jonathan.westover_at_u
    vu.edu About Me about.me/jonathan.h.westover

3
What we will Cover
  • This session will address the following 2 main
    topic areas
  • Proven best practices and principles of employee
    motivation with a focus on how to leverage
    employee capacity to optimize workplace potential
    and overall firm success.
  • Proven best practices and principles of
    productive work environments with a focus on
    creating a high performance work culture.

4
What we will CoverCont.
  • We will
  • Explain the importance of human capital
    maximization.
  • Identify approaches to designing a job to make it
    more motivating.
  • Explain how dissatisfaction affects employee
    behavior and firm performance.
  • Describe how organizations contribute to
    employees job satisfaction and retaining key
    employees.
  • Define high-performance work systems, conditions
    to create such a system, and summarize the
    outcomes of a high-performance work system.
  • Explain how human resource management can
    contribute to high performance and the purposes
    of performance management systems.
  • Explain how to provide performance feedback
    effectively and summarize ways to produce
    improvement in unsatisfactory performance.

5
Self-Assessment How Are We Doing? We are
confident that
  1. We consistently attract the best available talent
    to fill our human capital needs.
  2. We know who our most talented performers are and
    that we hire like talent.
  3. We have a handle on future needs for leadership
    and an outstanding strategy for filling these
    needs.
  4. All of our employees job assignments fit their
    unique talents and skill sets.
  5. Employee turn-over is low, particularly with our
    best people.
  6. Morale is high and that our people are happy in
    their jobs.

6
Self-Assessment How Are We Doing? We are
confident that
  1. We know the dreams and aspirations of our people
    and have developed career planning tools to match
    these desires with opportunities for development.
  2. We have put in place strategies whereby we will
    lose fewer of our talented people this year than
    we did last year.
  3. We know where strategic improvements are needed
    and we ARE making them.
  4. We have a performance appraisal system that is
    both accurate and fair.
  5. When our best employees choose to leave, our exit
    evaluation process identifies with great clarity
    why we suffered this loss.
  6. Our middle management supervisors possess the
    skills required to develop the people entrusted
    to them and have earned the trust of those they
    serve.

7
The Challenge of Utilizing Human Capital
  • How can I get the right people into the right
    job?
  • How can I reduce employee turnover?
  • How can I improve my performance management
    process?
  • How can I create a high-engagement work culture?
  • How can I best tap the full potential of my
    employees?

8
Maximizing Your Human Capital Potential
9
Designing Jobs That Motivate The Job
Characteristics Model
  1. Skill variety the extent to which a job
    requires a variety of skills to carry out the
    tasks involved.
  2. Task identity the degree to which a job
    requires completing a whole piece of work from
    beginning to end.
  3. Task significance the extent to which the job
    has an important impact on the lives of other
    people.
  4. Autonomy the degree to which the job allows an
    individual to make decisions about the way work
    will be carried out.
  5. Feedback - the extent to which a person receives
    clear information about performance effectiveness
    from the work itself.

10
Characteristics of a Motivating Job
11
The Truth about Motivation
Mastery
12
Job Withdrawal and Dissatisfaction
  • Job withdrawal a set of behaviors with which
    employees try to avoid the work situation
    physically, mentally, or emotionally.

13
Job Satisfaction
  • Job satisfaction a pleasant feeling resulting
    from the perception that ones job fulfills or
    allows for the fulfillment of ones important job
    values. The three important components are (1)
    Values, (2) Perceptions, and (3) Ideas of what is
    important

14
Employee Empowerment
  • Employee Empowerment Giving employees
    responsibility and authority to make decisions
    regarding all aspects of product development or
    customer service.
  • Employee Engagement Full involvement in ones
    work and commitment to ones job and company.
    This is associated with higher productivity,
    better customer service, lower employee turnover

15
Pikes Place Fish Market
  1. Play
  2. Make Their Day
  3. Be There
  4. Choose Your Attitude

16
Designing Motivating and Empowering JobsWhat
will you do?
  • How do these principles of designing jobs that
    are both motivating and empowering apply to your
    organization?
  • Which concepts do you think are most helpful and
    what are the first steps to implementing them?
  • What can you do immediately to start making a
    difference?

17
Performance Management
  • Performance management the process through which
    managers ensure that employees activities and
    outputs contribute to the organizations goals.
  • This process requires
  • Knowing what activities and outputs are desired
  • Observing whether they occur
  • Providing feedback to help employees meet
    expectations

Stages of the Performance Management Process
18
Performance Management
19
Types of Performance Measurement Rating Errors
  • Contrast errors the rater compares an
    individual, not against an objective standard,
    but against other employees.
  • Distributional errors the rater tends to use
    only one part of a rating scale.
  • Leniency the reviewer rates everyone near the
    top
  • Strictness the rater favors lower rankings
  • Central tendency the rater puts everyone near
    the middle of the scale
  • Rater bias raters often let their opinion of one
    quality color their opinion of others.
  • Halo error when the bias is in a favorable
    direction. This can mistakenly tell employees
    they dont need to improve in any area.
  • Horns error when the bias involves negative
    ratings. This can cause employees to feel
    frustrated and defensive.

20
Progressive Discipline
  • Hot-Stove Rule
  • Progressive Discipline
  • A formal discipline process in which the
    consequences become more serious if the employee
    repeats the offense.

Principle of discipline that says discipline
should be like a hot stove, giving clear warning
and following up with consistent, objective, and
immediate consequences.
21
Improving Performance
22
Outcomes of a High-Performance Work System
23
Key Features of Learning Organizations
  • Continuous learning each employees and each
    groups ongoing efforts to gather information and
    apply the information to their decisions.
  • Knowledge is shared one challenge is to shift
    the focus of training away from teaching skills
    and toward a broader focus on generating and
    sharing knowledge.
  • Critical, systemic thinking is widespread and
    occurs when employees are encouraged to see
    relationships among ideas and think in new ways.
  • Learning culture a culture in which learning is
    rewarded, promoted, and supported by managers and
    organizational objectives.
  • Employees are valued the organization
    recognizes that employees are the source of its
    knowledge. It therefore focuses on ensuring the
    development and well-being of each employee.

24
High Performance Work Culture What will you do?
  • How do these principles of performance management
    and creating a high performance work culture
    apply to your organization?
  • Which concepts do you think are most helpful and
    what are the first steps to implementing them?
  • What can you do immediately to start making a
    difference?

25
QUESTIONS?
  • Jonathan H. Westover, Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Management, Woodbury
    School of Business
  • Email jon.westover_at_gmail.com jonathan.westover_at_u
    vu.edu About Me about.me/jonathan.h.westover
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