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If you have lost heart in the Path of Love Flee to me without delay I am a fortress invincible (Rumi)

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If you have lost heart in the Path of Love Flee to me without delay I am a fortress invincible (Rumi) Rumi and his resting place (1207-1273) Why study Rumi? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: If you have lost heart in the Path of Love Flee to me without delay I am a fortress invincible (Rumi)


1
If you have lost heart in the Path of
Love Flee to me without delay I am a fortress
invincible (Rumi)
2
Rumi and his resting place (1207-1273)
3
Why study Rumi? Some popular facts
  • In 1997 Rumi was the best selling poet in US
  • Quoted in Seven Habits of Highly Effective People
    by Stephen Covey
  • Celebrities like Mary Stuart Masterson Jessica
    Parker make yoga with Rumis reading
  • Robin Beckers dance company performed a program
    called Dances from Rumi
  • The acoustic band Three Fish derived its name
    from Rumis tale
  • 2007 is announced as the year of Rumi by UNESCO

4
Rumi The Family Tree
  • Mawlana Jalaluddin Rumi
  • 1207 Balkh (Afghanistan) 1273 Konya (Turkey)
  • Parents Bahauddin Valad Mumina Khatun
  • Alaaddin Chalabi Jalaluddin Rumi
  • 1st Marriage with Gawhar Khatun Sultan Valad
    Alaaddin Chalabi
  • 2nd Marriage with Karra Khatun Amir Chalabi
    Malika Khatun

5
The People in his Life
  • Bahauddin Valad the father.
  • Sayyid Burhanaddin the successor of the father.
  • Shams-i Tabrizi the master or the friend.
  • Salahuddin-i Zarqubi the goldsmith.
  • Husameddin Chalabi the student.
  • Sultan Valad the son.

6
Bahauddin, the father and the first teacher
  • I was saying O God, I am in love with you and
    seeking for You. Wherever will I see you? In the
    world, beyond the world?
  • God moved me with the thought that the four walls
    of your body and the space that contains you are
    aware of you and live through you, but do not see
    you. Though they do not see you, neither from
    within nor from without, yet every atom of you is
    filled with the evidences of you. Likewise, you
    will not see Me within or without the world, but
    the atoms of the world all have something of Me.
    Your atoms thrive through Me and find joy in Me.
    How could you not see Me? (Maarif)

7
Bahauddin Valad the father
  • Dream and King of Clerics (Sultan al-Ulama)
  • Islamic Law and Spiritual Matters
  • Rumi and His Father Qibla
  • Occupation Preacher gt Maarif
  • From Balkh to Konya
  • Mongol Invasion? Fahr al-Razi?
  • Longing to find a more cosmopolitan urban
  • Bahauddin died in 1231 when Rumi was 24years old.

8
Sayyid Burhanaddin the successor of the father
  • Attain your fathers legacy full-share
  • and sun-like youll scatter light worldwide
  • Whatever is opposed to the self brings us near
    (to God) and whatever agrees with the self makes
    us more distant. When you act contrary to your
    carnal self, Almighty God is at peace with you
    when you make peace with the self, you are at war
    with God.
  • 5 years fasting, 4 years Law education in Syria
  • Two books Maarif Maqalat
  • Rumi quotes Burhan Stories, poems, many Quranic
    verses and their explanations

9
Shams-i Tabrizi
  • Shams Tabriz, my heart is pregnant with you
  • when will I see a child born by your fortune (D)
  • My thoughts and reflections are inspired by you
  • As though I were your phrases and expressions.
  • Strange childhood and a man of wonder
  • Faqih and faqir / Scholar and Sufi
  • His writings called Maqalat-i Shams
  • Shams came Konya in 1244, Sh over 60, R 37
  • The first meeting with Rumi at the inn of sugar
    sellers Bayazid versus the Prophet ?

10
  • Shams quotes Sanai for Rumi
  • Knowledge that takes you not beyond yourself
  • Such knowledge is far worse than ignorance.
  • Shams describes Rumi
  • At times his extensive knowledge would come
    before him and get in the way.
  • Again Shams
  • You want to discover through learning but it
    requires going and doing.
  • Sama Whirling / Poetry

11
  • Shams disappears after 2 years to Damascus
  • Sultan Valad in Damascus Shams is back
  • My sun and moon has come, my ears and eyes have
    come / those limbs of argent, that mine of gold
    has come! / let aberration fill my head and
    light my eyes / if there is anything else you
    like, that too has come.
  • Rumi, from learning and teaching to absorption
  • Shams disappears again forever
  • Rumi from absorption to perfection

12
Was Shams the master or Rumi?
  • Rumi writes for Shams
  • Whether I go east or west
  • or climb the sky
  • there is no sign of life
  • until I see sign of you
  • ???
  • I was ascete of a country
  • I held the pulpit
  • fate made my heart
  • fall in love
  • and follow after you (divan)

13
Shams writes for Rumi
  • I first came to Mawlana with the understanding
    that I would not be his master. God has not yet
    brought into being on this earth one could be
    Mawlanas master he would not be mortal. But nor
    am I one to be a disciple. It is no longer in me.
    Now I come for friendship, for relief. (Maqalat)
  • Seeing your face, by God, is a blessing. Anyone
    wishing to see the Prophet sent by God should
    look on Mawlana when he is at ease, true to
    himself, and not when he is standing on ceremony
    Happy the one who finds Mawlana! Who am I? One
    who found him. Happy am I!

14
Who is Rumi?
  • Muslim
  • - Sunni
  • - Hanefi
  • - Maturidi
  • - Sufi / Servant of God / Lover of God
  • - Scholar, writer, story teller, poet
  • His Characteristics
  • - Inclusive The Christian craftsman
  • - Forgiving The prostitute
  • - Humble The Christian priest

15
Rumis Writings
  • The Discourses of Rumi
  • 1. Fihi Ma fih (What is in it is in it.)
  • - 71 talks and lectures in the style of oral
    speech
  • - Recorded by his pupils
  • - Signs of the Unseen, trans. by Wheeler
    Tackston
  • 2. Majalis-i Seba (The Seven Sermons)
  • - His lectures on questions of faith and ethics
    on ceremonial occasions. It is in formal style.
  • - No English translation yet.

16
  • 3. Maktubat (The Letters)
  • - Letters to his students and relatives
    concerning their religious and daily issues
  • - 147 letters dictated by Rumi
  • Rumis Poems
  • 1. Divan-i Kabir (The great collection of poems)
  • - It is also called Divan-i Shams due to its
    last couplet
  • - 21.366 couplets about love, spiritual joy
  • - Rumi dictated the most of them in ecstasy and
    whirling

17
  • 2. Masnavi
  • - Masnavi adopts its name from verse form
    aabbcc. etc.
  • - 25,618 couplets
  • - Rumi wrote first 18 couplets and dictated the
    rest
  • - He told many stories from his own and borrowed
    some from Arabic, Persian, Jewish sources,
    Quran, and Hadith
  • - Nicholson says that Rumi borrows much but
    owes little he makes his own everything that
    comes to had.
  • RUMIS LEGACY
  • - 60.000 lines in Persian 120.000 lines in
    English more than Homer, Dante, Milton,
    Shakespeare

18
Rumi in his thoughts Seeing things as they are
  • If everything that appears to us were just as it
    appears, the Prophet, who was endowed with such
    penetrating vision, both illuminated and
    illuminating, would never have cried out, Oh
    Lord, show us things as they are. (F 5/18)
  • People look at secondary causes and think that
    they are the origin of everything happens. But it
    has been revealed to the saints that secondary
    causes are no more than a veil. (F 68-80)
  • Pass beyond form, escape from names! Flee titles
    and names toward meaning! (M 4/1285)

19
Beyond the Seen
  • The earth has the external shape of dust, but
  • inside are the luminous Attributes of God.
  • Its outward has fallen into war with its inward
    its
  • inward is like a pearl and its outward a stone.
    (M)
  • The picture drives its movements only from the
    Painters brush, the compass foot revolves
    around its point. (D)
  • Light is the First Cause and every secondary
    cause is its shadow. (D)
  • We are all darkness and God is light this house
    receives its brightness from the Sun (D)

20
Man
  • I look at my inmost consciousness and see a
    universe hidden, Adam and Eve not yet arisen
    from world. (M)
  • God created us in His own form Our description
    has taken instruction from His description. (M)
  • Form comes into existence from Formless, just as
    smoke is born from fire. (M)
  • Adams lapse was a borrowed thing, so he repented
    at once. But Iblis sin was innate, so he could
    not find the way to precious repentance.

21
Mans purpose
  • If man were human through his form, Muhammad and
    Abu Jahl would be the same. The painting on the
    wall is the likeness of a man. Look at that form.
    What does it lack? That splendid painting lacks a
    spirit. Go, seek that precious pearl. (M)
  • Oh Brother! You are your thought The rest of you
    is bones and fibers. If you think of roses, you
    are a rosegarden but if you think of thorns, you
    are fuel for the furnace. (M)

22
And his return
  • Since the unbelievers are of the same kind as
    hell, they are happy in the hellish prison of
    this world. Since the prophets are of the same
    kind as Paradise, they have gone to the paradise
    of the spirit and the heart. (M)
  • Their origin was from fire in the end they
    returned to their origin That group was born
    from fire Parts travel to their wholes The
    mother seeks her child, principles seek out their
    derivatives Without doubt every kind takes
    pleasure in its own kind. The part takes pleasure
    in its whole - look! (M)

23
Love
  • Every breast without the Beloved is a body
    without head. The man far from Loves snare is a
    bird without wings. What does he know of the
    universe? For he knows nothing of Those Who know.
    (D)
  • If you have not been a lover, count not your life
    as lived, for on the Day of Reckoning it will not
    be counted. Any time that passes without love
    will be shamefaced before God.
  • God said to Love, If not for your beauty, how
    should I pay attention to the mirror of
    existence?

24
What is Love?
  • Someone asked What is Love? I replied Ask not
    about these meanings! When you become like me,
    then youll know. When it calls you, youll
    recite its tale. (D)
  • Oh you who have listened to the talk of Love,
    behold Love! What are the words in the ears
    compared to vision in the eyes? (D)
  • What is Love? Perfect thirst. So let me explain
    the Water of Life. (D)

25
The world as maintained by Love.
  • Gods wisdom in His destiny and decree has made
    us lovers of one another.
  • That foreordainment has paired all parts of the
    world and set them in love with their mates.
  • Each part of the world desires its mate, just
    like amber and straw

26
  • Heaven says to the earth, Hello You draw me like
    iron to a magnet!
  • The female desires the male so that they may
    perfect each others work
  • God placed desire within man and woman so that
    the world might find substance through their
    union.
  • He places desire in each part for another part
    and their union gives birth to offspring. (D)

27
Rumi The Lover
  • I am like Majnun in my poor heart, which is
    without limbs, because I have no strength to
    contest the love of God.
  • Every day and night, I continue in my efforts to
    free myself from the bonds of the chain of love
    a chain which keeps me imprisoned.
  • When the dream of the Beloved begins, I find my
    self in blood.
  • Because I am not fully conscious, I am afraid in
    that I may paint Him, with the blood of my heart.

28
  • In fact, You, O Beloved, must ask the fairies
    they know how I have burned through the night.
  • Everyone has gone to sleep, but I, the one who
    has given his heart to You, do not know sleep
    like them.
  • Throughout the night, my eyes look at the sky,
    counting the stars.
  • His love so profoundly took my sleep that I do
    not really believe, it will ever come back.

29
Whirling
  • Do you know what whirling is? It is hearing the
    voices of spirits
  • Saying yes to Gods question Am I not your
    Lord? It is deliverance from ego and reunion
    with the Lord.
  • Do you know what the whirling is? It is seeing
    the Friends states,
  • hearing the secrets of God from across the
    curtains of the unseen.
  • Do you know what the whirling is? It is escaping
    ones existence, continuously tasting the
    everlasting existence in the absolute
    nonexistence.
  • Do you know what the whirling is? It is making
    ones head a ball in front of the Friends kicks
    of love and running to the Friend without head
    and feet.

30
  • Do you know what the whirling is? It is knowing
    Jacobs sorrow
  • And remedy, it is smelling the smell of the
    reunion with Joseph from Josephs shirt.
  • Do you know what the whirling is? It is
    swallowing Pharaohs spells just like Mosess
    staff every moment.
  • Do you know what the whirling is? It is a secret
    from the Prophetic Tradition There is a moment
    for me with God where no archangel or no prophet
    can come in between God and me.
  • It is reaching that place without any means where
    no angel can fit.
  • Do you know what the whirling is? It is, like
    Shams-i Tabrizi, opening the eyes of the heart
    and seeing the sacred lights.
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