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Vermilion County Action Team

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Title: Vermilion County Action Team Author: susanwerner Last modified by: dmhous2 Created Date: 12/3/2008 7:06:26 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Vermilion County Action Team


1
Vermilion County Action Team
  • Laurie Krolikowski Susan Werner

2
Where is Vermilion County?
3
Who lives in Vermilion County?
  • Racial Breakdown
  • There are 81,941 people in Vermilion County
  • White 85
  • African American 13
  • Hispanic 3.44
  • Asian 0.6
  • Native American 1.8
  • Other 3.11

4
What is the socioeconomic status of the people in
Vermilion County?
  • The median income in Vermilion County is 37,277
    compared to the state of Illinois median of
    54,124.
  • 20 of the people live in poverty.
  • In August 2008, it was estimated that 8.9 of the
    population of Vermilion County lived in extreme
    poverty (annual income of less than half of the
    poverty line- 10,325 for a family of 4).

5
What is the socioeconomic status of the people in
Vermilion County? (cont.)
  • Vermilion County has seen an increase in extreme
    poverty since the year 2000. According to
    Robert Hills article the likelihood of abuse and
    neglect go up as income declines (Hill, 2006).
  • Vermilion County has a higher rate of child abuse
    as compared to the state and central region (IL
    Criminal Justice Information Authority, 2003,
    2004 IL Dept of Children and Family Services
    2004-2005).

6
How many indicated reports were there in
Vermilion County?
  • African American children An average of 74.4 or
    2.5 of the African American children in
    Vermilion County. African American children
    accounted for 23.3 of the reports.
  • White children An average of 232.3 or 1.5 of
    the White children in Vermilion County. White
    children accounted for 72.9 of the reports.
  • For the fiscal years (FY) 2001-2007 the number of
    children and the ethnic differences that
    experienced an indicated report of child abuse
    and/or neglect were
  • All children An average of 318.6 children
    experienced an indicated report or 1.6 of the
    children in Vermilion County.

7
How many indicated reports were there in
Vermilion County?
8
What is length of stay in care in Vermilion
County?
  • For the fiscal years 1999-2006, the median length
    of stay by race was
  • All children The average median length of stay
    was 23.4 months.
  • African American children The average median
    length of stay was 26.1 months.
  • White children The average median length of stay
    was 18.9 months.
  • Hispanic children The average median length of
    stay was 37 months.
  • Children of other ethnicities The average median
    length of stay was 17 months.

9
What is length of stay in care in Vermilion
County?
10
How long does it take for kids to reach
permanency in Vermilion County?
  • Permanency at 12 Months
  • African American children19.9
  • White children 27.7
  • Hispanic children 11.8
  • Other children 28.8
  • Permanency at 24 Months
  • African American children 39.5
  • White children 48.4
  • Hispanic children 33.3
  • Other children 45.5

11
How long does it take for kids to reach
permanency in Vermilion County?
  • Permanency at 36 months
  • African American children 56.1
  • White children 69.4
  • Hispanic children 46.7
  • Other children 55.6

12
How long does it take for kids to reach
permanency in Vermilion County?
13
Vermilion County is lower than the national
average.
  • According to the research in the Government
    Accountability Office report, African American
    children stay in foster care on average 9 months
    longer than white children (GAO, 2008). In
    Vermilion County the average is slightly lower,
    and African American children stay 7.2 months
    longer than white children (Child Family
    Research Center).

14
How are they addressing concerns?
  • One of the new and exciting ways that Vermilion
    County social service agencies are working to
    address concerns is through.
  • FAMILY TREAMENT COURT

15
Why is the idea for Family Treatment Court
important?
  • According to the National Center for Addiction
    and Substance Abuse (1999) 80 of the confirmed
    cases of child abuse and neglect have substance
    abuse as a precipitating factor.
  • If a parent is unable to maintain a drug free
    lifestyle and make other significant changes in
    their lives, reunification with their children
    may be delayed or never occur.
  • Families that have substance abuse problems often
    have additional challenges such as poor housing,
    mental health problems, physical health problems,
    transportation issues, lack appropriate
    childcare, educational challenge and
    unemployment.

16
Why is the idea of Family Treatment Court
important (cont.)?
  • Parent often struggle with the mandates the court
    gives them. Often they cannot get into treatment
    as soon as they would like, do not have a
    comprehensive case management plan or have
    structured visitation with their children.
  • Family Treatment court uses the best practices
    model to effectively manage cases. This is done
    to ensure the children's best interest and
    provide all necessary services to the parents.

17
What is Family Treatment Court?
  • The Family Treatment court brings the
    professionals as an interdisciplinary team.
  • All cases are reviewed weekly by the team.
  • Incentives are given to the parent for meeting
    goals.
  • It extends beyond substance abuse treatment and
    deals with other issues such as domestic
    violence, mental and physical health, pending
    criminal charges, housing, child care and
    employment. These factors can further complicate
    or delay reunification and increase the time
    children remain in the foster care system.

18
Who is involved in Family Treatment Court?
  • Parent
  • Judge
  • Child Welfare Case Worker
  • Substance Abuse Counselor
  • Any additional professional services

19
The 4 stages of Family Treatment Court
  • Phase 1 Weekly meeting with probation, weekly
    court date and weekly drug screen.
  • Phase 2 Minimum 4 months of no rule violations,
    weekly court date, every other week drug screen.
  • Phase 3 Minimum 6 months of no rule violations,
    every other week court date and drug screen
  • Phase 4 Minimum 10 months of no rule violations,
    monthly court date and drug screen

20
How does Family Treatment Court address the issue
of permanency?
  • It is important to remember that according to the
    National Center for Addiction and Substance Abuse
    (1999) 80 of the confirmed cases of child abuse
    and neglect have substance abuse as a
    precipitating factor.
  • Parents need to be substance free to be good
    parents and FTC helps parents regain custody of
    their children by helping them gain their
    sobriety and address all other barriers to that
    reunification.

21
Quoted from the Northwest Professional
Consortium, Inc. (2005)
  • On average across sites, parents enrolled in
    family treatment drug courts were more likely
    than parents in traditional child welfare cases
    processing to be reunified with their children
    and less likely to have terminations of parental
    rights. On average, family treatment court cases
    were shorter than traditional child welfare
    cases.

22
References
  • Children and Family Research Center University
    of Illinois School of Social Work. Practice
    Resource and Outcome Monitoring Data
    Http//cfrcwww.social.uiuc.edu
  • Heartland Alliance for Human Rights (2008).
    Poverty trends in Vermilion County
    www.heartlandalliance.org.
  • Hill, Robert, (2006). Casey CSSP. Alliance for
    Racial Equality in the Child Welfare System
    Synthesis of Research on Disproportionality in
    Child Welfare.
  • Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority,
    (2003). A profile of juvenile justice activities
    and juvenile delinquency risk factors in
    Vermilion County. www.icjla.state.il.us

23
References (cont.)
  • Illinois Department of Children and Family
    Services (2005-2006). Child Abuse and Neglect
    Statistics.
  • United States Government Accountability Office
    (2008). African American Children in Foster Care.
    HHS and Congressional Action Could Help Reduce
    Proportion in Care.
  • United States Census Bureau (2000-2006). American
    Fact Finder Vermilion County Illinois.
  • Wheeler, M. Carson, L. Family treatment court
    Applying the drug court model in child
    maltreatment cases. Drug Court Practitioner fact
    sheet June 2006 Vol. 1
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