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WRITING A FRQ/DBQ INTRODUCTION

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WRITING A FRQ/DBQ INTRODUCTION Mr. Sieg KEYSTONE OAKS HIGH SCHOOL APEH-APUSH-WH 9 WRITING AN INTRODUCTION Once you have determined where you are going with your ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: WRITING A FRQ/DBQ INTRODUCTION


1
WRITING A FRQ/DBQ INTRODUCTION
  • Mr. Sieg
  • KEYSTONE OAKS HIGH SCHOOL
  • APEH-APUSH-WH 9

2
WRITING AN INTRODUCTION
  • Once you have determined where you are going with
    your answer and come up with a thesis, the next
    question is where does the thesis go?
  • Its simple.
  • Place it as the last sentence of the
    Introduction. If the reader of your essay has to
    guess where your thesis is, you are in trouble!
  • Always state it at the end of the Introductory
    Paragraph.
  • Use this basic 3 step approach of organizing your
    introduction. Some people call it the upside
    down triangle. Start out general, become more
    specific and then end with your sharp and concise
    thesis statement.

3
Upside Down Triangle
Begin with a general statement identifying
the issue being discussed (Time and Place) Then
add a statement(s) by identifying some possible
answers to the question or prompt Become
focused by stating your thesis statement
General Information
More Specific
4
WHICH ONE IS THE BEST?
  • Which of the following Examples (A or B) is an
    example of a well written introduction that ends
    in an exact thesis statement? Choose which is
    the best example and underline the thesis.
  • Question or prompt How can this school improve?
  • Example A
  • Schools can always use improvement. Many feel
    that increasing electives for students can create
    a more diverse curriculum. Others recognize
    increasing technological opportunities as a step
    in the right direction. However, evidence shows
    that schools can rapidly improve by improving
    food choices, providing an enthusiastic faculty,
    and smaller class sizes.
  • Example B
  • Some schools need to be improved while others
    do not. Many people believe our school needs to
    improve drastically. Others feel that it is fine
    the way it is and change is not a requirement.
    Either way, each person must decide for him or
    herself whether or not the school can and should
    be improved.

5
EXAMPLE A IS THE BEST
  • Example A
  • Schools can always use improvement. Many feel
    that increasing electives for students can create
    a more diverse curriculum. Others recognize
    increasing technological opportunities as a step
    in the right direction. However, evidence shows
    that schools can rapidly improve by improving
    food choices, providing an enthusiastic faculty,
    and smaller class sizes.

6
DO NOT
  • Refer to the present or today
  • Use first person
  • You, Your, I, me, we, yinz, usins
  • Use weak or vague words like stuff or things
  • Use intelligent words which give you credibility
    as a thinker with reasoning skills
  • Put the thesis anywhere but the end of the
    introduction
  • Use fluffy or flowery phrases
  • Ex) Without this we would not be alive today!
  • OH Yeah. Do not use exclamation points!

7
EXAMPLES FROM WH 9
  • During the Middle Ages in Europe, invasions were
    inevitable. The Magyars, Vikings, and Muslims
    were tribes that invaded the continent during
    this time of turmoil. The European people needed
    a plan. Feudalism was started in Europe because
    people needed protection, people needed to
    survive, and there was not a strong ruler or King
    to provide stability.
  • (Military, Agriculture, Political)

8
EXAMPLES FROM WH 9
  • During the Middle Ages in Europe, peace was rare.
    With Vikings, Magyar and Muslim invasions and
    attacks from all directions, people lived in
    constant fear. This era was a watershed moment
    in history because it ensured the survival of
    western civilization. Feudalism, met the
    challenges of this chaotic time by providing a
    strong military, adequate political stability,
    and efficient domestic strategies.

9
PROMPT
  • EXPLAIN HOW LUTHERS IDEAS WERE BOTH CONSERVATIVE
    AND REVOLUTIONARY

10
EXAMPLES FROM APEH
  • Transitioning out of the European Renaissance,
    individualism was still popular, encouraging many
    people to become educated. People began to
    develop the ability to read and think for
    themselves. Reacting to the new abilities of
    reading (especially scripture), the church and
    religious authorities began to come under
    scrutiny. In 16th century Europe, the Reformation
    was fully in progress with Luther being one of
    the most well-known Protestant reformers of the
    time in which he achieved great success through
    his revolutionary religious ideas, conservative
    social theories, and their political effects on
    Europe.

11
EXAMPLES FROM APEH
  • Martin Luther, the father of the German
    Reformation of the 16th Century, is usually
    associated with religious enlightenment and, for
    one reason or another, social liberalism. But
    although his revolutionary ideas did forever
    change the face of Christendom, he was also a
    staunch conservative in regards to many issues.
    By holding theological views which differed
    drastically from the Catholic norm and founding a
    completely new Church, Luther can be seen as a
    radical. However, many of his views concerning
    social reform and his treatment of dissenting
    religious opinions from his own coincide with a
    more conservative mindset.
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