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from the Odyssey, Part One by Homer translated by Robert Fitzgerald

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Title: from the Odyssey, Part One by Homer translated by Robert Fitzgerald


1
from the Odyssey, Part Oneby Homertranslated by
Robert Fitzgerald
Feature Menu
Introducing the Selection Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict Reading Focus Reading an
Epic Writing Focus Think as a Reader/Writer
2
from the Odyssey, Part OneIntroducing the
Selection
What difference can a journey make in a persons
life?
3
from the Odyssey, Part One Introducing the
Selection
Click on the title to start the video.
4
from the Odyssey, Part One Introducing the
Selection
The Odyssey is a tale of a heros long and
dangerous journey home.
It is also the story of a son in need of his
father and of a faithful wife awaiting her
husbands return.
5
from the Odyssey, Part One Introducing the
Selection
When we first meet Odysseus, he is a prisoner on
the goddess Calypsos island.
Zeus sends his messenger, Hermes, to set Odysseus
free, and the adventure begins.
What does the angry Poseidon, god of the sea,
have in store for our hero?
End of Section
6
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
An ordinary hero saves children from a roaring
river or rescues people from a burning building.
You might learn about a hero on the news, or
perhaps you admire a hero in your own life.
7
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
An epic hero is larger than life, more impressive
than an ordinary human being. An epic hero
usually has these character traits
  • uncommon strength
  • exceptional knowledge
  • cunning (cleverness)
  • courage
  • daring

8
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
An epic hero often goes on a dangerous journey or
quest of discovery.
When the hero succeedsor failson that journey,
he or she does it on a grand scale.
9
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
On the journey, the hero encounters challenges
and dangers.
The hero experiences conflict as he or she faces
forces of nature, gods, and other beings who help
or prevent the heros progress.
10
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
As heroes deal with conflict after conflict, they
embody, or personify, the values of the society
they represent.
For example, a heros actions may show values
such as bravery, intelligence, or physical
strength.
11
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
Read the following passage.
Janya gasped as Adric staggered, then fell. The
Ogre King began a slow charge toward Adric, axe
raised. Thinking fast, Janya threw her grappling
hook into a great oak, where it caught on a limb.
She pulled with all her might. The great tree
crashed down into the Ogre Kings path.
Janya gasped as Adric staggered, then fell. The
Ogre King began a slow charge toward Adric, axe
raised. Thinking fast, Janya threw her grappling
hook into a great oak, where it caught on a limb.
She pulled with all her might. The great tree
crashed down into the Ogre Kings path.
How does Janya represent the heroic quality of
physical strength?
Janya uses her uncommon strength to pull down a
tree.
12
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
Read, then listen to, the following passage from
the Odyssey.
My heart beat high now at the chance of
action, and drawing the sharp sword from my hip I
went along his flank to stab him where the
midriff holds the liver. I had touched the
spot when sudden fear stayed me if I killed
him we perished there as well, for we could
never move his ponderous doorway slab aside. So
we were left to groan and wait for morning.
How do Odysseuss actions show the value of
intelligence?
In your own words, describe what is happening in
this passage.
13
from the Odyssey, Part One Literary Focus Epic
Heroes and Conflict
As you read the Odyssey, think about
  • the conflicts Odysseus faces
  • how he overcomes these conflicts
  • the decisions and actions that make him a hero

End of Section
14
from the Odyssey, Part One Reading Focus
Reading an Epic
With long, complex works such as epics, it can be
difficult to keep track of characters and events.
When you read a long work, try these reading
strategies
  • paraphrasing
  • summarizing
  • asking questions

15
from the Odyssey, Part One Reading Focus
Reading an Epic
If you are reading a complex passage, try
paraphrasing.
Restate the content, but use your own words.
Act as if youre telling a friend about what has
just happened in the story.
16
from the Odyssey, Part One Reading Focus
Reading an Epic
Read the following passage and restate the
content in your own words.
For two days, Argent rode with his news across
the grasslands to the foothills of the north. As
his horse slowed to climb the rocky pass, Argent
surveyed the landscape. The bushes and trees
clung to the rocks like men huddling about a fire.
Argent, who has news to deliver, rode across the
grasslands on his horse, finally reaching the
foothills.
17
from the Odyssey, Part One Reading Focus
Reading an Epic
Read, then listen to, the following passage from
the Odyssey.
Then I sent out two picked men and a runner to
learn what race of men that land sustained. They
fell in, soon enough, with Lotus Eaters, who
showed no will to do us harm, only offering the
sweet Lotus to our friends but those who ate
this honeyed plant, the Lotus, never cared to
report, nor to return they longed to stay
forever, browsing on that native bloom, forgetful
of their homeland.
Paraphrase the excerpt.
18
from the Odyssey, Part One Reading Focus
Reading an Epic
To be sure you are following the sequence of
events, summarize, or briefly note each event, in
the order it occurred.
Then the men met the Lotus Eaters.
First, Odysseus sent three men to find out who
lived on the island.
The men ate the Lotus plant and forgot about home.
19
from the Odyssey, Part One Reading Focus
Reading an Epic
Ask questions to monitor your comprehension.
Why couldnt the men remember their home?
What did the men eat?
How did they leave the land of the Lotus Eaters?
20
from the Odyssey, Part One Reading Focus
Reading an Epic
Into Action As you read, use the 5W-How?
questions to make sure you understand the epic.
  • Who are the main characters?
  • What has happened so far, and what might happen
    next?
  • Where and when are the events taking place?
  • Why are the events happening?
  • How does the epic hero use his talents to resolve
    the conflict?

End of Section
21
from the Odyssey, Part OneWriting Focus Think
as a Reader/Writer
Find It in Your Reading
  • As you read, write down what you learn about
    Odysseus.
  • Is he . . .
  • noble or selfish?
  • wise or foolish?
  • arrogant or humble?

End of Section
22
Vocabulary
23
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
adversity n. hardship great misfortune.
formidable adj. awe-inspiring by reason of
excellence strikingly impressive.
profusion n. large supply abundance.
adversary n. enemy opponent.
tumult n. commotion uproar confusion.
24
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
When people are faced with adversity in their
lives, they may respond in a variety of ways.
Great misfortune might cause one person to become
discouraged.
Another person, however, might become motivated
to rise above the hardship.
25
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Which of the following would be an inappropriate
response to adversity in a friends life?
enthusiasm
concern
thoughtfulness
26
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Which of the following would be an inappropriate
response to adversity in a friends life?
Because adversity is related to great misfortune,
enthusiasm would be an inappropriate response.
enthusiasm
27
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
If you face a formidable opponent, you likely
have respect for his or her skill.
A formidable opponent has strikingly impressive
skills that may lead to your defeat.
28
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Would you want a formidable player on your team?
Why or why not?
29
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Would you want a formidable player on your team?
Why or why not?
You would likely want a formidable player on your
team. His or her awe-inspiring abilities would
help your team tremendously.
30
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
If a stores owner orders too much merchandise,
she may be left with a profusion of products that
she cannot sell.
She may have to ship the abundance of unsold
products back to their manufacturers.
31
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Which image shows a profusion of gumballs?
32
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Which image shows a profusion of gumballs?
This image shows a large supply, or profusion, of
gumballs.
33
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Adversaries at work, Adam and Delia often
competed for the most interesting projects.
Tired of their acting like opponents, their boss
required them to work together.
34
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Is adversary used correctly in the following
sentence?
Paolo embraced an adversary, or close friend,
after the soccer match.
35
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Is adversary used correctly in the following
sentence?
Paolo embraced an adversary, or close friend,
after the soccer match.
An adversary is an enemy or opponent, so Paolo
would not embrace an adversary after the match.
Adversary is not used correctly in this sentence.
36
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
On your first visit to Manhattans Grand Central
Station, you might become confused by the tumult
of rushing travelers and announcements.
When the train station becomes especially busy at
rush hour, the uproar can be astonishingly
confusing.
37
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Which scene would most likely result in a tumult?
  1. a lone man watching his favorite team on TV
  2. a judge reading a controversial decision to a
    packed courthouse
  3. a couple watching a scary movie

38
from the Odyssey, Part One Vocabulary
Which scene would most likely result in a tumult?
  1. a lone man watching his favorite team on TV
  2. a judge reading a controversial decision to a
    packed courthouse
  3. a couple watching a scary movie

39
The End
40
QuickWrite
41
from the Odyssey, Part OneQuickWrite
How could events in a journey reveal the heroic
qualities in someone? Write down your opinions.
End of Section
42
Meet the Writer
43
from the Odyssey, Part OneMeet the Writer
The Iliad and the Odyssey are both attributed to
a poet named Homer, but no one really knows much
about this man. The later Greeks believed he was
a blind minstrel, or singer, from the island of
Chios. However, seven different cities claimed to
be his birthplace. Also, if Homer were blind, he
would have been able to see at one time because
his epics are so rich in visual imagery.
End of Section
44
Preview the Selection
45
from the Odyssey, Part One
Preview the Selection
In the Odyssey you will meet Odysseus, an epic
hero consumed with one goal He wants to return
home to his kingdom of Ithaca and his faithful
wife Penelope.
End of Section
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