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Robotics study guide

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Robotics study guide ITE I The main parts of a robot A robot has five main parts: Arm Controller Drive End Effector Sensor CONTROLLER - Every robot is connected to a ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Robotics study guide


1
Robotics study guide ITE I
2
The main parts of a robot
  • A robot has five main parts
  • Arm
  • Controller
  • Drive
  • End Effector
  • Sensor

3
CONTROLLER
CONTROLLER - Every robot is connected to a
computer, which keeps the pieces of the arm
working together. This computer is known as the
controller. The controller functions as the
"brain" of the robot.
4
ARM
ARM - Robot arms come in all shapes and sizes.
The arm is the part of the robot that positions
the end-effector and sensors to do their
pre-programmed business.
5
DRIVE - The drive is the "engine" that drives the
links (the sections between the joints into their
desired position. Without a drive, a robot would
just sit there, which is not often helpful. Most
drives are powered by air, water pressure, or
electricity.
6
END- EFFECTOR - The end-effector is the "hand"
connected to the robot's arm. It is often
different from a human hand - it could be a tool
such as a gripper, a vacuum pump, tweezers,
scalpel, blowtorch - just about anything that
helps it do its job. Some robots can change
end-effectors, and be reprogrammed for a
different set of tasks.
7
SENSOR - Most robots of today are nearly deaf and
blind. Sensors can provide some limited feedback
to the robot so it can do its job. Compared to
the senses and abilities of even the simplest
living things, robots have a very long way to go.

8
DEGREES OF FREEDOM Click on the robot's color-coded joints to see how they move.
                                         ROTATE BASE OF ARM     PIVOT BASE OF ARM     BEND ELBOW     WRIST UP AND DOWN     WRIST LEFT AND RIGHT     ROTATE WRIST
Some robots have 8, 12, or even 20 degrees of
freedom, but these 6 are enough for most basic
tasks. As a result, most jointed-arm robots in
use today have 6 degrees of freedom.
9
Work Envelope the area in which the robot
operates.
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  • Issac Asimov's most important contribution
    to the history of the robot is the creation of
    his Three Laws of Robotics
  • A robot may not injure a human being, or, through
    inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  • A robot must obey the orders given it by human
    beings except where such orders would conflict
    with the First Law.
  • A robot must protect its own existence as long as
    such protection does not conflict with the First
    or Second Law.

15
1959John McCarthy and Marvin Minsky start the
Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
(MIT).1961Heinrich Ernst develops the MH-1, a
computer operated mechanical hand at MIT.
Artificial intelligence (AI) is a branch of
computer science that deals with intelligent
behavior, learning, and adaptation in machines.
Research in AI is concerned with producing
machines to automate tasks requiring intelligent
behavior
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17
Robots at Work
Ninety percent of robots work in factories, and
more than half are at work making automobiles.
18
Robots at Play
Sonys AIBO
Lego Mindstorm
19
Asimov
  • The Five Factors to developing a Humanoid Robot
  • Interaction
  • Locomotion
  • Navigation
  • Manipulation
  • Intelligence

20
Exploring Robots The Mars Rovers
Spirit and Opportunity
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