Wilfred Owen or Robert Frost poem and then discussion of The Great Gatsby or Hamlet - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Wilfred Owen or Robert Frost poem and then discussion of The Great Gatsby or Hamlet PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 7253d9-YjczO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Wilfred Owen or Robert Frost poem and then discussion of The Great Gatsby or Hamlet

Description:

Wilfred Owen or Robert Frost poem and then discussion of The Great Gatsby or Hamlet Prose (Gatsby) worked well when candidates understood that the particular ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:103
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 58
Provided by: Preferr600
Learn more at: http://guffordsenglishclasses.weebly.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Wilfred Owen or Robert Frost poem and then discussion of The Great Gatsby or Hamlet


1
Wilfred Owen or Robert Frost poem and then
discussion of The Great Gatsby or Hamlet
2
IB English Formal Oral Commentary Notes
3
Must bringPen/pencil/highlighters(Use the
appointment pass to get out of class)
4
You will be given The poem Paper (as needed
for notes and other prep) Colored markers/pen
to use during prep time Pen(s) if needed
Dictionary and thesaurus if needed
5
Statements to start the oral State name and
candidate numberState name of poet and title of
the poem
6
State to endIs there anything else you would
like to add? (You respond) This concludes the
higher level English internal assessment.
7
WHAT IB WANTS Independent critical
discussion/analysis Speech that is lively,
precise, individual and unpretentious No ums
kind of sort of Focus on the levels of
meaning and to connect different parts of the poem
8
Application of the principles of literary
criticism In poem, to distinguish between poet
and speaker/persona Familiarity with
intricacies of plot, character motivation,
structure A candidate who speaks unaided for 8
minutes
9
DELIVERY AND DISCUSSION (max 10 min)The
commentary shouldØSituate the poem in specific
context early.ØDiscuss the effectiveness of the
writers techniques and THE EFFECT of stylistic
devices.
10
ØAim to explore all significant aspects of the
poem. ØYou also want to know poet background,
where the passage comes in the work, poet typical
techniques/devices/writing style
11
Examine the presentation and role of characters,
relationships, themes, use of language, effects
of structure, style, technique, tone/voice,
narrative situation, plot, setting, image
patterns, significance of key words or lines,
imagery, and the significance of the poem in the
poets body of works
12
Teachers role A sympathetic listener Please
consider the oral a persuasive and justified
address to a further/larger audience Expect a
few follow up questions at the end. Assignment
time is 10 minutes, and then a shift into Gatsby
or Hamlet
13
SUBSEQUENT QUESTIONSThe purpose of the
discussion is to probe more deeply into the
candidates knowledge and understanding of the
work. This can provide an opportunity to
rephrase or expand inadequate or doubtful
statements.
14
GUIDING QUESTIONS You will receive two with
your poem. One with tend to be a
significance/thematic question (So what?) and
one with deal with stylistic technique (How (is
it achieved)?)
15
Their purpose is to offer candidates a starting
point for organizing the commentary. Do NOT
confine your answer to just these questions.
You should respond to these questions sometime
during your commentary, but they do not need to
be the organizational factor of your presentation.
16
SAMPLE GUIDING QUESTIONSHow does the poem define
the role of X?What stylistic devices, including
images, are used to help convey Xs state of mind?
17
What is established by this poem? By what means
has it been achieved?How is our perception of
the relationship between X and Y developed in
this poem?What is the primary significance of
this poem?
18
What devices/techniques used in this passage are
typical of this poet?What are the dominant
images used? What effects do they have?
19
Discuss the poetic devices used to develop the
tone of the excerpt. How does the tone help
develop X?Identify the poetic techniques used in
this poem. Relate them to the content.
20
Score Boundaries for Orals (2004)IB Score vs.
Raw Score (out of 30)7 26-306 22-255 18-
214 14-173 11-132 6-101 0-5
21
FORMAL ORAL SUBJECT REPORT COMMENTS 2011
IB Score   Score Band   (2011)7              
26-30            06               22-25  
        315               18-21          
674               14-17           573      
        11-13           102                6-10
           01               0-5               
04.72 avg score 10 no pass
22
The vast majority of teachers substantially
over-mark candidate performance (in A and B
rubric areas)Teacher must be certain that
commentaries last no longer than 8 minutes (to
allow 2 minutes for subsequent questions).The
most useful subsequent questions (by teacher)
return to significant details in the extract that
were previously untreated or insufficiently
treated.
23
The best candidates produced commentaries that
were detailed, insightful, carefully organized
and engaging. The few best commentaries were
effective and engaging, detailed and even
occasionally original. They were a pleasure to
listen to and they had obviously been a pleasure
for the candidates to deliver.
24
Only a handful of candidates were genuinely
engaged in a process of discovery, analysis and
synthesis of what had been discovered, and in no
more than 1 or 2 could candidate have been
described as taking any pleasure in the exercise.
25
It is good to see that fewer candidates are
offering line by line analysis, but this has been
replaced too often by randomness and
generalization. A number of candidates promise a
structure of sorts normally a rather haphazard
list of items to be covered but even when this
has been followed (which is only sometimes the
case), little sense of a coherent reading
emerges. Rather than dissecting the extract,
candidates are hacking it apart, then tossing the
bits literary devices, themes, characters
randomly at the examiner.
26
Moderators noted a tendency toward patchwork
commentaries bits of knowledge, analysis, ideas,
comments were offered, but no integrated reading
of the text emerged.The ones who begin with
This passage is important because it reveals X
and then go on to demonstrate it are sadly rare.
A developed, detailed and organized analysis of
the extract was expected of them.
27
Context was frequently a problem. Candidates
tended to content themselves with explaining what
happens just before the extract, and perhaps what
happens just after failing to recall that
context can and should also include character
revelation, thematic development, the interplay
of imagery (especially in Shakespeare), changes
in tone and so on.
28
Attempts to synthesize (not just generalize) the
meaning and significance of the entire extract in
a close, coherent reading were rare. Seldom was
there any evidence that the candidates had
internalized the extract or poem so that they
could respond to it as a coherent literary
experience.
29
Candidates should be encouraged to bring their
own insights to the commentary, and not feel
compelled to repeat taught material.Few
candidates considered Shakespeare extracts as
words written to be performed by actors on stage
before an audience!
30
IB Subject Report Comments 2007 and before
31
The candidates should certainly be capable of
approaching these passages with all the
exuberance of recent discovery. (May 04
05)Engagement with the text before them should
always be primary to recitation of learned/taught
content or what the teacher has told you in
class. (May 04)While the extract should remain
central at all times in the commentary, it should
not be treated as if it exists in a vacuum.
Context must be shown.
32
When literary features were treated at all, they
were listed, sometimes examples were given, but
almost never were they discussed in terms of HOW
these served to develop and communicate meaning.
(May 04)
33
In general, there is little attempt to see how
tone affects an extract, or to analyze how this
tone is created. Students should internalize
the passage or poem so that they can respond to
it as a coherent literary experience. (May
04)The few best commentaries were effective and
engaging, detailed, even occasionally original.
They were a pleasure to listen to, and they had
obviously been a pleasure for the candidates to
deliver. (May 04)
34
Prose (Gatsby) worked well when candidates
understood that the particular extract needs to
be examined as closely as poetry, and in terms of
author technique and narration, not content
alone. (May 03)Students should be encouraged to
discuss the ways in which character is revealed
or developed and the way themes are presented and
developed. Narrative perspectives should be
treated more fully in the teaching of novels.
(Nov 06)
35
Too often little or nothing is said about
speaker, narrative voice, or authorial
positioning on issues of significance. Sadly,
what is missing in so many commentaries is the
appreciation and engagement with the beauty and
power behind what is conveyed in the text because
the enthusiasm to scour the extract for those
telling details is needed for a convincing
personal response. (May 03)A developed,
detailed, and organized analysis of the extract
is expected of candidates. (May 04 06)
36
If candidates would only take the trouble to
start out with a clearly established sense of
direction, then often sheer thoughtfulness may
carry them the rest of the way. A good
commentary will always leave the listener with a
sense of purposeful or organic direction, a clear
and persuasive prioritizing of the possibilities
afforded by the passage. (May 03)
37
It was as ever a delight to hear those
candidates who wanted to persuade their
listeners, who had something they wanted to
communicate about the text, a point of their own
they wished to make and who understood the need
to convince the listener in a dynamic way. (Nov
03)On the word persuasive in C, suffice it to
say that a communicable sense of joy, enthusiasm
and positive engagement with the extracts
details on whatever level will often go further
to convince and persuade than the often obvious
disaffection of some fragmentary, mechanical, or
bored efforts. (May 03)
38
Students who lapse into casual speech patterns
not only risk producing meaningless utterances
(Shakespeare was pretty brilliant, yknow,
considering what he did) but they undermine any
claims they may have to a measure of authority on
their subject. (May 03)
39
Teachers should work to give candidates tools to
develop their own responses. (May 06) Students
should show personal and unrehearsed engagement
in the literary analysis of the extract. (Nov
05)Detailed, subtle nuances are expected in
literary analysis at the English A1 level. (May
05)
40
WHAT IB WANTSWhat not all candidates see with
a Shakespeare extract is that a threefold
awareness in inevitability needed to ensure that
not just context and content is covered, but also
the poetic and the dramatic, an awareness of who
and what is being seen and/or heard on the stage
itself
41
..It is encouraging when references are made to
the performance realm and that increasingly
candidates are recognizing that it is the
response of an audience to what has happened, is
happening, or just about to happen that needs to
be considered and not simply What is it you
read?
42
Candidates ought to be able to make context
meaningful by discussing why the extract is
important in terms of, say, character, plot, or
thematic development a good question to consider
is
43
what is going to happen or change subsequently
in the work as a result of thoughts, events, or
words in extract? Not only dramatic, but also
psychological, emotional, and intellectual
developments may be crucial.
44
Only the strongest candidates have shown
themselves able to discuss the extracts as
literary experiences, bringing in the rest of the
work or related works to enrich their points
about the text before them.
45
Suggestion The poem should not be used as a
springboard for a discussion of everything the
candidate knows about the poet in question. The
commentary should focus on the extract itself,
relating it to the whole work only where
relevant.
46
Suggestion Begin your commentary by indicating
how the passage fits into the work as a whole
(situate the text) and what its major features
seem to be (your thesis an introduction that
allows the listener to know what you are going to
cover in greater detail).
47
(No Transcript)
48
(No Transcript)
49
OLD stuff
50
PREPARATION TIME (max 20 minutes)1) Read the
extract (several times) and accompanying guiding
questions carefully.2) Identify and analyze
closely all the significant aspects of the
extract (try to figure out what the examiner
chose this passage).
51
3) Underline words or phrases that deserve
comment. You may want to use colored pencils to
help organize your thoughts.4) Prepare the
content and organize the structure of the
commentary. Organize your response so that you
can quickly supply examples as you speak.
52
5) Loosely outline the structure of your
commentary. Keep your outline brief but precise.
Avoid generalities. Focus your comments on what
you think are the main points being illustrated
by this passage and state this early on in your
commentary. A line-by-line commentary may be
thorough, but it is also dull and may waste
valuable time. Your presentation should be
effectively organized and not a list of details
or unconnected points!
53
6) Know how you are going to begin and end your
commentary7) Candidates should make notes for
reference and outline, but not read them as a
prepared speech.8) Be excited about your
passage!
54
Suggestion The passage should not be used as a
springboard for a discussion of everything the
candidate knows about the work/poet in question.
The commentary should focus on the extract
itself, relating it to the whole work only where
relevant.
55
Suggestion Begin your commentary by indicating
how the passage fits into the work as a whole
(situate the text) and what its major features
seem to be (your thesis an introduction that
allows the listener to know what you are going to
cover in greater detail).
56
Suggestion Try to measure the effectiveness and
clarity of what you are saying by maintaining
some eye contact with the examiner. (a puzzled
expression by me means clarify, slitting my
throat means time to move on)
57
Suggestion Study the oral descriptors/rubric in
preparation for how to structure and what should
be said to receive top marks.
About PowerShow.com