2015 COSCDA Program Managers Conference: Ending Youth and Family Homelessness - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – 2015 COSCDA Program Managers Conference: Ending Youth and Family Homelessness PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 723327-ZjdkN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

2015 COSCDA Program Managers Conference: Ending Youth and Family Homelessness

Description:

Defining an end to family homelessness. Working together with our partners at the state, local, and federal level to strengthen the local crisis response systems, we ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:101
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 20
Provided by: coscdaOrg
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: 2015 COSCDA Program Managers Conference: Ending Youth and Family Homelessness


1
2015 COSCDA Program Managers Conference Ending
Youth and Family Homelessness
  • Jasmine Hayes, USICH
  • March 17, 2015

2
Roles of USICH
  • Coordinates the Federal response to homelessness
  • Maximizes the effectiveness of 19 Federal agency
    partners
  • Shares best practices
  • Drives collaborative solutions

3
Opening Doors
  • No one should experience homelessness and no one
    should be without a safe, stable place to call
    home.
  • The Plan sets forth four bold and ambitious
    goals
  • Finish the job of ending chronic homelessness by
    2017
  • Prevent and end homelessness among Veterans by
    2015
  • Prevent and end homelessness for families, youth,
    and children by 2020
  • Set a path to ending all types of homelessness

3
4
Themes of Opening Doors
  • Increase leadership, collaboration, and civic
    engagement
  • Increase access to stable and affordable housing
  • Increase economic security
  • Improve health and stability
  • Retool the homeless crisis response system

5
Needs and problems families experiencing
homelessness face
  • Many of the needs of families experiencing
    homelessness mirror those faced by low income
    families.
  • Low human capital (low educational attainment,
    minimal job histories, low incomes)
  • Partner violence and childhood abuse
  • Health and dental needs (more acute and chronic
    than general population under 45 years of age)
  • Mental health problems (depression, anxiety,
    PTSD)

6
Defining an end to family homelessness
  • Working together with our partners at the state,
    local, and federal level to strengthen the local
    crisis response systems, we will
  • Ensure that no family is living unsheltered
  • Shorten episodes of family homelessness by
    providing resources that enable families to
    safely reenter permanent housing as quickly as
    possible
  • Link families to the benefits, supports, and
    community-based services they need to achieve and
    maintain housing stability and
  • Identify and implement effective prevention
    methods to help families avoid homelessness.

6
7
Family Connection Building Systems to End Family
Homelessness
  • A resource to help communities and stakeholders
    build and implement an effective housing crisis
    response system for families. 

7
8
Key Areas of Action
  • Four key strategy areas for Federal, state, and
    local action to end family homelessness
  • Develop a centralized or coordinated entry
    system
  • Ensure interventions and assistance are tailored
    to meet the unique needs of families
  • Improve linkages to local mainstream systems to
    help families gain access to benefits,
    employment, and community-based services more
    quickly
  • Develop and build upon evidence-based practices
    for serving families experiencing or at-risk of
    experiencing homelessness.

9
Priorities and Opportunities
  • Housing Trust Fund
  • Invest in cost-effective solutions like RRH
  • Target more intensive interventions like PSH to
    families with highest needs and greatest barriers
    to obtaining/maintaining housing

10
Priorities and Opportunities contd
  • Learn from child welfare and supportive housing
    demonstration
  • System of care approach to integrating and
    coordinated local, state and Federal resources to
    maximize access to range of supportive services
  • Leverage existing mainstream Federal resources
  • Highlight local efforts using combination of
    local, State and Federal resources e.g., IVE,
    PSSF

11
Federal Framework to End Youth Homelessness
11
12
Federal Framework to End Youth Homelessness
  • Strategy I Getting to Better Data
  • A confident estimate of youth homelessness
  • Data coordination, youth Point in Time (PIT)
    count strategy, and household survey
  • Strategy II Building Capacity for Service
    Delivery
  • A research-informed intervention model
  • Review research and apply to intervention
    strategies
  • Increased evidence of effective interventions
  • Identify and scale-up evidence-based practices
    and increase rigorous evaluation
  • Gaps analysis
  • Investigate funding and capacity needs of programs

13
Why a Youth Intervention Model?
  • Provides a consistent, collaborative approach to
    ending youth homelessness
  • Shifts the focus from individual programs to
    coordinated systems
  • Allows for flexibility to local context and
    circumstances
  • Shifts the focus from outputs to outcomes

14
14
15
Vulnerable Subpopulations of Youth
  • Implications for Culturally-Appropriate,
    Effective Interventions
  • Higher levels of risk and trauma on average
  • Evidence-based interventions are available to
  • Treat substance abuse and mental health issues
  • Promote healing and recovery from trauma
  • Build key skills and capacities in youth
  • Increase the capacity of service providers to
  • Accurately identify service needs
  • Match those needs to appropriate interventions

Youth in Foster Care LGBTQ Youth Juvenile Justice
Youth Pregnant/ Parenting Youth
16
What were doing now
  • USICH Report to Congress on Federal Programs
  • Integrating Runaway and Homeless Youth program
    data with HUDs Homeless Management Information
    Systems
  • Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act
  • ACYF Planning Grants
  • LGBTQ Youth Homelessness Prevention
  • Capacity Building for LGBTQ Youth 3/40 Blueprint
  • Performance Partnership Pilots (P3)
  • HUD Demonstration on Improving Self-Sufficiency

17
FY 2016 Budget - 5.5 billion in targeted
homelessness assistance
  • 67,000 new Housing Choice Vouchers
  • 345M increase to Homeless Assistance Grants
    includes RRH for 15,000 families with children
  • 177M in tenant-based rental assistance for
    families, Veterans, tribal families
  • 20M for new Family Unification Program (FUP)
    vouchers to serve youth and families
  • 120M allocated to Housing Trust Fund
  • Upward Mobility Project Combine HUD and HHS
    block grant
  • Increases in RHYA and Head Start
  • IVE flexibility and CAPTA opportunities -
    prevention

18
For more information
  • Jasmine Hayes, Policy Director
  • Jasmine.hayes_at_usich.gov
  • (202) 205-9996
  • Resources
  • http//usich.gov/population/families
  • http//usich.gov/population/youth
  • http//usich.gov/usich_resources/fact_sheets/the-p
    residents-2016-budget-homelessness-assistance
  • http//www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/resource/acf-hu
    d-announce-prevent-end-homelessness
  • http//www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ocs/resource/csbg-
    dear-colleague-letter-innovation-in-response-to-ho
    melessness

19
Stay Connected!
  • Join our online conversation.
  • Sign up for our newsletter at usich.gov/signup

https//www.facebook.com/pages/US-Interagency-Coun
cil-on-Homelessness/161277853932076 https//twitte
r.com/usichgov http//vimeo.com/usichgov
19
About PowerShow.com