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Developing Rubrics to Encourage Student Self-Assessment

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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: renee Last modified by: Pam Created Date: 4/15/2013 2:56:56 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Developing Rubrics to Encourage Student Self-Assessment


1
Developing Rubrics to Encourage Student
Self-Assessment Improve Learning Outcomes
  • Martha E. Casazza
  • TRPP Associates
  • casazza_at_trppassociates.com
  • Sharon L. Silverman
  • TRPP Associates
  • silverman_at_trppassociates.com

2
Effective Teaching

  • Competencies
  • Assessments Learnin
    g Activities


3
What is the Purpose of Assessment?
  • Is assessment more important for the instructor
    or the student? Why?
  • When is assessment administered? Why?
  • How does assessment align with learning
    activities?
  • How does assessment align with competency?
  • Is assessment a process or a tool?

4
Authentic vs Traditional Assessment
  • Traditional --------------------------------------
    ------- Authentic
  • Selecting a Response -----------------------------
    ------- Performing a Task
  • Contrived ----------------------------------------
    ----------------------- Real-life
  • Recall/Recognition -------------------------------
    Construction/Application
  • Teacher-structured -------------------------------
    ------ Student-structured
  • Indirect Evidence --------------------------------
    ------------ Direct Evidence
  • Authentic Assessment Toolbox Jon Mueller
  • http//jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/whatis
    it.htm

5
Current Assessment Tools
  • What tools do you use most often?
  • How often do you assess your students?
  • What is the students role in assessment?
  • What do they communicate to your students?

6
What are Rubrics?
  • Using Rubrics

7
Why Use Rubrics?
  • They are more descriptive.
  • They communicate standards in advance.
  • They provide for consistency across sections.
  • They contribute to reliability and validity.
  • They enable formative feedback.
  • They help students understand feedback.

8
Designing a Rubric
  • Determine its purpose analytic or holistic?
  • Review competencies and learning objectives.
  • Set your expectations and determine a range of
    performance levels.
  • Use Blooms cognitive levels to set specific,
    measurable criteria for each level Be
    descriptive, not judgmental.

9
Determining a Scale
  • Sample ranges
  • Excellent, good, developing
  • Distinguished, proficient, intermediate, novice
  • Exemplary, proficient, marginal, unacceptable
  • 1, 2, 3

10
Types of Knowledge (Bloom)
11
Cognitive Process Dimension (Bloom)
12
Lets Apply
  • Competency
  • Setting Personal and Academic Goals
  • Learning Objective
  • Construct a set of SMART academic goals for the
    next 4 years.

13
Performance Criteria
  • Create
  • Evaluate
  • Analyze
  • Apply
  • Understand
  • Remember

Mastery Developing Beginning    
14
A Rubric According to Bloom
  • 1 2 3 4
    5

  1c Construct a set of SMART academic goals for the next 4 years.   Does not know how to define an academic goal.   Explains an academic goal and begins to construct a set of academic goals.   Remembers all the components of a SMART goal but does not understand how to apply them to academic goals.   Understands the components of a SMART goal but does not apply them to academic goals over a period of 4 years.   Constructs a set of SMART academic goals for the next 4 years.  
15
Lets Apply
  • Competency
  • Understanding Self as a Learner
  • Learning Objective
  • Keep a journal that describes changes in approach
    to learning and submit weekly.

16
Lets Complete a Rubric

1 2 3 4 5

  2c Keep a journal that describes changes in approach to learning and submit weekly. Does not describe approaches to learning in weekly journal.   Describes approaches to learning in weekly journal but not how they are changing.       Understands and clearly describes in weekly journal specific changes in approach to learning.  
17
Presentation Rubric
  • 1. Technical Explanation (10 points) ____________
  • Effectively explains new information to audience
  • Demonstrates understanding of how topic is
    important for audience
  • Is able to understand, interpret, and apply
    learned materials and concepts
  • Uses references properly
  • 2. Oral Presentation (20 points) ___________
  • a. Preparation (5)
  • Speaks comfortably without notecards
  • Uses proper American English
  • Uses visual aids effectively
  • Makes smooth presentation
  • b. Effectiveness of presentation (5)
  • Presents well mechanically (does not block
    screen, doesnt exhibit nervous behaviors, etc.)
  • Makes eye contact
  • Can be heard easily
  • Finishes on time
  • Explains slides effectively

18
Presentation Rubric (cont.)
  • c. Organization (5)
  • Plans and delivers an oral presentation
    effectively applies the principle of
  • (tell them)3 is well organized
  • Introduction is oriented to help audience
    understand the general topic
  • Goals of talk are explained clearly
  • Flow of thought Items presented in logical
    order
  • Summary and Conclusions summarized main points
  • d. Group Cooperation (5)
  • Material divided among group members
    appropriately
  • Smooth transitions between group members sic
    presentations
  • 3. Professionalism (5 points) __________
  • Professional appearance
  • Professional language
  • Professional attitude
  • Team Number ______ TOTAL POINTS______________
  • Assessed by____________________
  • COMMENTS

19
Holistic Rubric
  • The Scoring Rubric for the Department of
    Political Science
  • A The A-range essay implies a strong argument
    and provides convincing specific
  • support from the various readings. The writer
    demonstrates mature command of
  • language through a variety of sentence
    structures, word choices, quotes or paraphrases
    from the readings (consistently cited correctly).
    Control of usage and mechanics, despite
    occasional flaws, contributes to the writers
    ability to communicate the purpose of the paper.
    The writer thoroughly understands the
    concepts/theories involved and through the essay
    can convince others of their viewpoints or help
    make the reader aware of something completely new
    or original. These essays are occasionally kept
    and shared with other students. These are
    powerful due to organization and creativity.
  • B The B-range essay shows effort and promise
    for the writer. It presents a thesis
  • (argument) and often suggests a plan of
    development that is carried out effectively.
  • Mastery of the readings/theories may not be fully
    indicated with the use of quotes or
  • paraphrases, but the writer provides enough
    supporting details, makes competent use of
    language, and sometimes varies sentence
    structure. Occasional errors in usage and
    mechanics do not interfere with the writers
    ability to communicate the purpose of the paper.

20
Holistic Rubric (cont.)
  • C The C-range essay presents a thesis
    (argument) and often suggests a plan of
  • development, which is generally carried out. The
    writer may or may not have completed all of the
    required readings and utilizes generalizations or
    list for support. Command of the theories under
    consideration is weak or shaky. Sentence
    structure tends to be repetitious, and errors in
    usage and mechanics sometimes interfere with the
    writers ability to communicate the purpose of
    the paper.
  • D The D-range may present a thesis (argument)
    however, the plan of development is usually not
    carried out. This indicates the writer may have
    spent little time with the
  • readings or thinking about the concepts involved.
    The writer provides support that tends to be
    sketchy and/or illogical. Sentence structure is
    simplistic, repetitious and
  • occasionally awkward. Language is often
    inappropriate in tone, or style. Errors in usage
    and mechanics are frequent.
  • F The paper presents a thesis that is vaguely
    worded, weakly asserted or there is no central
    argument present. Support, if any, tends to be
    rambling and superficial. Sentence structure is
    difficult to follow and errors in usage and
    mechanics interfere with the writers ability to
    communicate the purpose of the paper.

21
How will you use Rubrics?
22
Resources
  • More than 50 Sample Rubrics
  • http//assessment.udel.edu/resources/rubrics.html
  • Using Rubrics to Promote Thinking and
    Learning(includes sample rubric for a persuasive
    essay)http//www.ascd.org/publications/educationa
    l-leadership/feb00/vol57/num05/Using-Rubrics-to-Pr
    omote-Thinking-and-Learning.aspx
  • Digital Portfolio Rubric (sample)https//www2.uws
    tout.edu/content/profdev/rubrics/eportfoliorubric.
    html

23
  • Martha E. Casazza
  • TRPP Associates
  • casazza_at_trppassociates.com
  • Sharon L. Silverman
  • TRPP Associates
  • silverman_at_trppassociates.com
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