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Catastrophe Readiness and Response: A New Course Almost Ready for Final Release

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Catastrophe Readiness and Response: A New Course Almost Ready for Final Release Rick Bissell, PhD Brian Maguire, DrPH David McEntire, PhD Gavin Smith, PhD – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Catastrophe Readiness and Response: A New Course Almost Ready for Final Release


1
Catastrophe Readiness and Response A New Course
Almost Ready for Final Release
  • Rick Bissell, PhD
  • Brian Maguire, DrPH
  • David McEntire, PhD
  • Gavin Smith, PhD

2
Catastrophes
  • CNN Report Climate Change Catastrophic1
  • 300,000 excess deaths/year now due to climate
    change
  • 300 million vulnerable to climate change in 2009.
    This number is set to double by 2030.2
  • 1.http//www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/europe/05/29/annan
    .climate.change.human/index.html
  • 2. Global Humanitarian Forum Human Impact
    Report Climate Change -- The Anatomy of a Silent
    Crisis

3
New/Enhance Secondary Catastrophes
  • Mass migration from newly uninhabitable lands
    becomes a catastrophe in itself.
  • So. Pacific island countries, heavily populated
    lowland countries (Bangladesh, Netherlands, etc)
    and cities (NYC?, NOLA? Miami?)
  • Desertification in Asia, Africa, Latin America
    and North America

4
Oldies but Goodies, Now More Frequent and Powerful
  • Hurricanes
  • Flooding
  • Drought
  • Heat waves
  • Epidemics/pandemics

5
Oldies but Goodies, Now More Complex
  • Networked and articulated electrical power
    systems
  • Networked and vulnerable information systems
  • Networked and articulated supplies delivery and
    management systems
  • See work of Lagadec, et al

6
Expiration of Resources
  • Petroleum
  • Natural gas
  • Potable and irrigation water
  • Food

7
Violent Conflicts
  • Competition for scarce resources
  • Changing world order
  • Increasingly lethal weapons, with wider
    distribution
  • Rise of terrorism
  • Rogue states

8
Cumulative Effects-gt More Catastrophes
  • Loss of arable land and useable water leads to
    increased food shortage
  • Increased desperation leads to mass migration,
    violence, or both
  • Increased intensity of storms presents many
    direct dangers, but also can contribute to loss
    of arable land, useable water and food.

9
What to Do?
  • Mitigation many worldwide attempts to mitigate
    climate change and its effects
  • Preparedness
  • Many European and Asian countries preparing for
    direct effects.
  • Some intercontinental preparedness activities
    (Lagadec, et al)
  • FEMA, three approaches

10
FEMAs Three Approaches to Preparedness for
Catastrophes
  • Scenario-based intensive planning for geographic
    regions, with traditional top-down plans and
    exercises.
  • Scenario-based intensive planning for geographic
    regions with bottom-up plans and exercises.
  • EMI course on catastrophe readiness and response.

11
Charge
  • Develop a new course for upper division
    undergraduates and graduate students on the tasks
    necessary for planning, preparedness for and
    response to catastrophes.

12
Assumptions
  • Catastrophes are fundamentally different from run
    of the mill disasters
  • Lack of immediate mutual aid
  • Affect interlocked systems of communications,
    power, transport, food delivery, health care,
    national commerce
  • Span multiple jurisdictions and levels of
    government overwhelming complexity
  • Response is not just more of the same

13
Assumptions - 2
  • Future EMs will face more catastrophes and more
    severe ones
  • Political authorities will depend on EMs for
    guidance
  • International assistance (US receiving as well as
    US providing) will become more common among North
    Atlantic countries

14
Assumptions - 3
  • All-hazards planning is not up to the task
    scenario-specific planning is required to deal
    with hypercomplex events
  • Flexibility and unconventional responses will be
    even more important, and they can be learned and
    planned

15
Expectations
  • Course instructors may not have deep background
    in this field instructor guidance needs to be
    comprehensive.
  • FEMA catastrophe planning provides good examples,
    but it is rapidly changing.
  • Students will need to do much background reading
    (10-15 hrs/wk).

16
Course Structure
  • 15-week semester 3 credit hours
  • 11 core sessions, 2 case studies, 1 tabletop
    exercise, 1 summary and final exam, and at least
    3 add-on sessions
  • Each session has some kind of class exercise.
  • Designed for in-class easily converted to
    online.

17
Sessions 1 2
  • 1. Course Introduction Definitions, Background,
    Differences Between Disasters and Catastrophes
  • Lead developer Bissell
  • Status Available for review and comments
  • 2. Mechanisms of Past and Future Catastrophes
  • Lead developer Bissell
  • Status Available for review and comments

18
Sessions 3-5
  • Session 3 Variables and Relationships
  • Lead developer David McEntire
  • Status Available for review and comments
  • Session 4 Ethics
  • Lead developer Anna Schwab
  • Status Will be available 1 July 09
  • Session 5 Political and Legal Issues
  • Lead developer John Pine
  • Status Available for review and comments

19
Sessions 6-7
  • Session 6 Social and Economic Issues
  • Lead developer Kevin Simmons
  • Status Available for review and comments
  • Session 7 Logistics, Critical Infrastructure and
    Public Health
  • Developers Tricia Wachtendorf, Rick Bissell,
    Drew Bumbak
  • Status Available for review and comments

20
Sessions 8-10
  • Session 8 Mass Relocation
  • Lead developer Anthony Oliver-Smith
  • Status Available for review and comments
  • Session 9 Planning Strategies and Skills
    Response
  • Lead developer Brian Maguire
  • Status Available for review and comments
  • Session 10 Planning Strategies and Skills
    Recovery/Reconstruction
  • Lead developer Gavin Smith
  • Status Available for review and comments

21
Sessions 11-13
  • Session 11 Emergent Organizations and Networks
  • Lead developer Tricia Wachtendorf
  • Status Available for review and comments
  • Session 12 NMSZ and New Catastrophe Planning
    Methods
  • Lead developers Scott Wells, Jasmin Ruback
  • Status Expected by July
  • Session 13 Case Study Pandemic Flu
  • Lead developers Bissell and Tom Kirsch
  • Status Available for review and comments

22
Sessions 14-15
  • Session 14 Tabletop Exercise
  • Lead developer Myra Socher
  • Status Available for review and comments
  • Session 15 Summary and Exam
  • Lead developer Bissell
  • Status Expected by July

23
Add-on Sessions
  • Leadership
  • Lead developer TBA
  • North Atlantic Collaboration
  • Lead developer Erwan Lagadec
  • Catastrophe Mental Health / PTSD
  • Lead developer Jeff Mitchell

24
Institutional Partners
  • Center for Transatlantic Relations the Johns
    Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies
    (Lagadec)

25
Questions???
26
Thanks!
  • The Catastrophe Course Team
  • Contact Bissell_at_umbc.edu
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