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IL Best Practices: Innovative Approaches to Fit Your Institutional Needs Sheril Hook, Instruction Coordinator, University of Toronto Mississauga – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: IL Best Practices:


1
IL Best Practices
  • Innovative Approaches to Fit Your Institutional
    Needs

Sheril Hook, Instruction Coordinator, University
of Toronto Mississauga Stephanie Sterling
Brasley, Manager, Information Literacy
Initiatives, California State University, Office
of the Chancellor
2
Participants will be able to
  • Articulate the major ideas from categories 5 and
    10 of the Best Practices Guidelines
  • Identify assessment tools for information
    literacy development
  • Identify basic strategies for how categories 5
    and 10 of the Best Practices Guidelines can be
    applied to their own instructional and
    institutional environments

3
Agenda
  • Category 5 articulation with the curriculum
  • Playing with the IL Standards
  • IL by design embedding IL into course outcomes
  • Category 10 assessment and evaluation
  • Instruction statistics
  • Horizontal and vertical integration

4
ALA/ACRL Characteristics of Programs of
Information Literacy that Illustrate Best
Practices
  • Category 5 Articulation with the Curriculum
  • Articulation with the curriculum for an
    information literacy program
  • is formalized and widely disseminated
  • emphasizes student-centered learning
  • uses local governance structures to ensure
    institution-wide integration into academic or
    vocational programs
  • identifies the scope (i.e., depth and complexity)
    of competencies to be acquired on a disciplinary
    level as well as at the course level
  • sequences and integrates competencies throughout
    a students academic career, progressing in
    sophistication and
  • specifies programs and courses charged with
    implementation.
  • http//www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/characte
    ristics.htm

5
IL Standards
  • Standard One
  • The information literate student determines the
    nature and extent of the information
  • Performance Indicator
  • 2. The information literate student identifies a
    variety of types and formats of potential sources
    for information.
  • Outcomes include
  • Knows how information is formally and informally
    produced, organized, and disseminated
  • Recognizes that knowledge can be organized into
    disciplines that influence the way information is
    accessed
  • Identifies the value and differences of potential
    resources in a variety of formats (e.g.,
    multimedia, database, website, data set,
    audio/visual, book)
  • Differentiates between primary and secondary
    sources, recognizing how their use and importance
    vary with each discipline
  • Realizes that information may need to be
    constructed with raw data from primary sources

"Information Literacy Competency Standards for
Higher Education." American Library Association.
2006.http//www.ala.org/acrl/ilcomstan.html
(Accessed 15 May, 2007)
6
  • Lets play with the standards

7
IL Standards
  • Standard One
  • The information literate student determines the
    nature and extent of the information
  • Performance Indicator
  • 2. The information literate student _________ a
    variety of types and formats of potential sources
    for information.
  • Outcomes include
  • ________ information is formally and informally
    produced, organized, and disseminated
  • _________ knowledge can be organized into
    disciplines that influence the way information is
    accessed
  • __________the value and differences of potential
    resources in a variety of formats (e.g.,
    multimedia, database, website, data set,
    audio/visual, book)
  • __________between primary and secondary sources,
    recognizing how their use and importance vary
    with each discipline
  • __________ that information may need to be
    constructed with raw data from primary sources

"Information Literacy Competency Standards for
Higher Education." American Library Association.
2006.http//www.ala.org/acrl/ilcomstan.html
(Accessed 15 May, 2007)
8
Student EngagementIL depth complexity
  • research-based learning
  • problem-based learning
  • inquiry-based learning
  • case-based learning
  • discovery learning
  • knowledge building

Scardamalia, M., Bereiter, C. (2003).
9
Research Question (inquiry-based)
  • How have myths changed over time?

2.
Humanities
10
AssignmentMyth over Time
  • Outcomes
  • Explore the dynamism of myth by comparing and
    contrasting a selection of ancient and modern
    primary sources of a myth (at least one literary,
    one material)
  • Identify the most significant changes from
    ancient to modern source and discuss those
    changes in light of the context in which each
    source was created
  • Interpret those changes in terms of how they
    affect the meaning of the myth and how they came
    about in the first place

Humanities
1.
11
  • Outcomes
  • compare and contrast a selection
  • of primary sources (art)
  • Students begin by finding primary sources--art
    works, music, scripts, opera and background
    information on artists

Google has images, but no provenance information
Camio has images, plus provenance and usage
rights information
Humanities
3.
12
  • Outcomes
  • identify the most significant changes...in light
    of the context in which each source was created.

Students build on the learning acquired by
finding background information on a time
period/place
Humanities
4.
13
  • Outcomes
  • identify the most significant changes...in light
    of the context in which each source was created.

Students place a myth in the cultural context in
which its being used or re-told
Humanities
5.
14
  • Outcomes
  • compare and contrast a selection of primary
    sources (music)

Students listen to a symphony to identify the
dynamism of the myth and interpret its
significance
Humanities
6.
15
ALA/ACRL Characteristics of Programs of
Information Literacy that Illustrate Best
Practices
  • Category 10 Assessment/Evaluation
  • Assessment/evaluation of information literacy
    includes program performance and student
    outcomes and
  • for program evaluation
  • establishes the process of ongoing
    planning/improvement of the program
  • measures directly progress toward meeting the
    goals and objectives of the program
  • integrates with course and curriculum assessment
    as well as institutional evaluations and
    regional/professional accreditation initiatives
    and
  • assumes multiple methods and purposes for
    assessment/evaluation-- formative and
    summative-- short term and longitudinal
  • http//www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/characte
    ristics.htm

16
ALA/ACRL Characteristics of Programs of
Information Literacy that Illustrate Best
Practices
  • Category 10 Assessment/Evaluation (contd)
  • Assessment/evaluation of information literacy
    includes program performance and student
    outcomes and
  • for student outcomes
  • acknowledges differences in learning and teaching
    styles by using a variety of appropriate outcome
    measures, such as portfolio assessment, oral
    defense, quizzes, essays, direct observation,
    anecdotal, peer and self review, and experience
  • focuses on student performance, knowledge
    acquisition, and attitude appraisal
  • assesses both process and product
  • includes student-, peer-, and self-evaluation
  • http//www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/characte
    ristics.htm

17
Assessment
  • Assessment is the process of gathering and
    discussing information for multiple and diverse
    purposes in order to develop a deep understanding
    of what students know, understand, and can do
    with their knowledge as a result of their
    educational experiences the process culminates
    when assessment results are used to improve
    subsequent learning.
  • Mary E. Huba and Jann E. Freed. Learner-Centered
    Assessment on College Campuses Shifting the
    Focus from Teaching to Learning. Allyn Bacon,
    2000.

18
Evaluation
  • Evaluation is any effort to use assessment
    evidence to improve institutional,
  • departmental, divisional, or institutional
    effectiveness

19
Program Evaluation Components
  • An Assessment/Evaluation Program Plan
  • What are we assessing?
  • What are our IL instruction goals?
  • What are the measurable outcomes?
  • How will we measure at the course/curricular
    level?
  • Who are our campus partners?
  • How can we tie into institutional efforts?
  • What data do we need to collect?

20
Program Evaluation Snapshot of Course
Penetration
  • 100/200 level course penetration
  • Where
  • Core courses, instructor status
  • What
  • Standards 1-5
  • How
  • Concept-based or tool-based

21
Instruction Database
22
Instruction Statistics
23
Stats tell a story
  • Redundancy
  • Gaps
  • Planning

24
Stats identify approaches
Fig. 5 Number of unique instruction sessions
given by type
25
Class snapshot
26
Class Snapshot, contd
27
Interpreting Statistics
28
Assessment of Student Outcomes
29
Direct Assessment
  • Definition
  • Direct evidence of student performance collected
    from students
  • Actual samples of student work
  • Assess student performance by look at their work
    products
  • Examples
  • Assignments
  • Research papers
  • Portfolios
  • Dissertations/theses
  • Oral presentations
  • Websites
  • Posters/videos
  • Instructor-designed exams or quizzes

30
Indirect Assessment
  • Definition
  • Provides perspectives and perceptions about what
    has been learned
  • Faculty must infer students skills, knowledge,
    and abilities rather than observing from direct
    evidence
  • Examples
  • Exit interviews
  • Surveys student satisfaction, Course instruction
  • Focus groups
  • Self-reported reflections
  • Research journals or diaries
  • Student ratings of skills
  • Graduation Rates
  • Job Placement Rates

31
Formative Assessment
  • Ongoing measure of student learning
  • Provides feedback to student and instructor on
    learning process
  • Takes place during the learning process
  • Examples
  • Classroom assessment techniques, targeted
    questions, in-class exercises, research
    journals/diaries, concept maps

32
Summative Assessment
  • Information gathered at the end of instruction
  • Used to evaluate the efficacy of the learning
    activity
  • Answers the question of whether learners learned
    what you had hoped they would
  • Typically quantitative
  • Examples test scores, letter grades, graduation
    rates

33
Formative vs. Summative
  • When the cook tastes the soup, thats formative
    when the guests taste the soup, thats
    summative. - Robert Stakes
  • http//library.cpmc.columbia.edu/cere/web/ACGME/do
    c/formative_summative.pdf

34
Classroom Assessment
  • Provides continuous flow of accurate information
    on student learning
  • Learner-centered
  • Teacher Directed
  • Mutually Beneficial
  • Formative
  • Context-specific
  • Ongoing
  • Rooted in Good teaching practice

35
Classroom Techniques-Examples
  • 1-minute paper
  • Muddiest Point
  • 1-sentence Summary
  • 3-2-1

36
CATS Web Form Example
  • http//www2.library.ucla.edu/libraries/college/113
    06.cfm
  • One Minute Paper form
  • Quarter
  • Class
  • Instructor
  • Librarian
  • Your name
  • Your phone number
  • Your email address
  • 1. What is the most significant or meaningful
    thing you have learned during the session? (Feel
    free to add more items)
  • 2. What question(s) remain uppermost in your
    mind?

37
Example Indiana University Bloomington Libraries
  • http//www.indiana.edu/libinstr/Information_Liter
    acy/assessment.html
  • Basic Goal 1. Appreciates the richness and
    complexity of the information environment.
  • Objective 1.1. You will be able to describe the
    wide array of information sources available and
    discuss their appropriateness for a given
    information problem. Possible Measurement
    Techniques
  • Essay examination Oral report Practicum in the
    library Written evaluation assignment
  • Basic Goal 4. Design and use a search strategy
    tailored to a specific information need.
  • Objective 4.1. You will be able to describe and
    execute an appropriate search strategy in a given
    information source or in multiple information
    sources. Possible Measurement Techniques
  • Annotated bibliography with search strategy
    discussion included Collaborative learning
    exercise in class Practical exercise Practicum
    examination Research journal Research paper
    proposal Research portfolio Research
    worksheet

38
Diagnostic Assessment
  • Assesses knowledge and skills of students before
    instruction is designed
  • Determines where student is in terms of learning
    identifying gaps in student learning
  • Can provide a baseline for student achievement in
    a subject area
  • Examples standardized tests, review of students
    prior work, pre-tests/instructor-developed tests.

39
Assessment in Practice iSkills, SAILS, iLit,
ILT, ICDL
40
Assessment Tools Evaluation Considerations
  • Audience
  • Test Development Reliability and Validity
  • Costs Development and Administration
  • Test Type performance-based? Multiple-choice?
  • Delivery mechanism web? Print? Simulations?
  • Content/Standards
  • Scoring and Reporting Features

41
SAILS Standardized Assessment of Information
Literacy Skills
  • Librarians at Kent State University, 2000
  • Test of information literacy skills
  • Web-based test
  • Multiple choice questions
  • 142 whole items in American English
  • Students answer 40 items 5 pilot
  • Based on 4 or 5 ACRL Standards (not 4)

42
iSkills Assessment (Formerly ICT Literacy
Assessment)
  • ETS staff with CSU and 7 core institutions
  • Assesses Information and Communication Technology
    (ICT) Literacy
  • Web-based, performance-based, scenario-based test
  • Core and Advanced Versions 75 minutes
  • 15 Tasks 14 short (1-3 min) and 1 long (15 min)
  • Test tasks aligned with and informed by ACRL
    Standards, ISTE NETS standards

43
Information Literacy Test (ILT)
  • James Madison Universitys Center for Assessment
    and Research Studies and the Library
  • Designed to assess the ACRL standards (not 4)
  • Web-based
  • Multiple Choice test
  • 60 operational items and 5 pilot
  • Password-protected-Secure administration
  • Reliability 0.88
  • Cost - ??

44
iLIT
  • Developed by CA. Community College librarians,
    CSU Subject Matter experts, Test Development
    experts, Psychometricians
  • Web-based
  • Multiple choice questions
  • Aligned to ACRL standards
  • Affordable
  • High-Stakes, proctored

45
Your Institutions Needs
  • The Characteristics in Practice
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