Universities in a Flat World Implications for Global Strategy Pradeep K. Khosla Dean, College of Engineering Dowd Professor and Director, Cylab - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Universities in a Flat World Implications for Global Strategy Pradeep K. Khosla Dean, College of Engineering Dowd Professor and Director, Cylab PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 71836e-Zjk3Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Universities in a Flat World Implications for Global Strategy Pradeep K. Khosla Dean, College of Engineering Dowd Professor and Director, Cylab

Description:

Universities in a Flat World Implications for Global Strategy Pradeep K. Khosla Dean, College of Engineering Dowd Professor and Director, Cylab – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:48
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 12
Provided by: Geni66
Learn more at: http://hibp.ecse.rpi.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Universities in a Flat World Implications for Global Strategy Pradeep K. Khosla Dean, College of Engineering Dowd Professor and Director, Cylab


1
Universities in a Flat WorldImplications for
Global StrategyPradeep K. KhoslaDean, College
of EngineeringDowd Professor and Director, Cylab
2
Changing Landscape A Flat World
  • Companies have transformed from doing business
    globally to being global enterprises thanks to
    Computing and Communications technologies!
  • Manufacturing of products globally
  • Industry supported Research and development is
    going global
  • Availability of trained human resources and more
    effective on a cost basis
  • Ability to solve problems and develop products of
    local interest
  • IP provisions in foreign countries are more
    attractive to companies

50 of respondents to a 2004 Industrial Research
Institute study indicated that they are funding
research at foreign universities.
3
American companies have recognized and embraced
this transformation
Source Council on Competitiveness
4
Talent Pool is Global
  • 10 years ago about 40 of Engineering work hours
    were within the US
  • By 2010 about 10 of the Engineering work hours
    will be based in US
  • India and China graduate a total of about 15X
    more engineers every year compared to about
    65,000 in the US
  • The cost of an engineering work hour in
    India/China is between 10-20 of that in the US
  • Routine engineering jobs are being outsourced at
    a very fast pace
  • Downward pressure on salaries will continue

5
Foreign Governments Investing in RD
  • Foreign governments are investing in RD
  • Lack the strong and dominating culture of RD in
    the US (at least for the next 10-20 years)
  • Increased competition for UG and Grad students
    from other countries (Australia, Singapore,
    Europe, etc)

6
Universities Stuck in the Old World
  • The 21-st century university is still local
  • Education is local, not scalable, and relatively
    expensive
  • Research is performed locally Issues with IP
    provisions (Bayh-Dole, Tax free bonds etc)
  • Students from all countries come to campus
  • current geo-political issues indicate and predict
    a decrease in the number of international
    graduate students due to ITAR regulations and
    VISA issues
  • What will be the future of Engineering graduates
    in the US?
  • Carnegie Mellon is taking a leadership role in
    defining a new curriculum
  • Engineers will be required to operate in a global
    (multi-national and multi-cultural) environment
    and must appreciate the needs of the people where
    products are manufactured and sold

7
What is the Real Issue?
  • The Real issue is not that other countries are
    graduating more students, but
  • By when will these countries have the culture of
    US that integrates research, education, economic
    development in a cohesive strategy and compete
    head-to-head with the US success model
  • By when will foreign universities establish more
    economically affordable models for delivering
    education within the US and to US students within
    foreign countries
  • Since this will happen, how should a university
    respond to this threat?

8
Implications of A Flat World for CMU Engineering
College
  • Rethink how to educate our undergraduate and
    graduate students so that they are able to
    compete, succeed, and lead in the new global
    business environment Rethink Education to
    create the Carnegie Plan for a Flat World
  • Managing Innovation in a Global multilingual and
    multicultural environment
  • Holistic Education
  • Take the culture of CMU graduate education and
    RD to foreign countries by creating a
    collaborative and scalable research and education
    infrastructure
  • Capitalize on the RD investment of foreign
    governments and industry
  • Offer opportunity to graduate students and
    faculty to operate globally and in diverse
    cultures
  • Strategic Goals for Globalization
  • Create more visibility for Carnegie Mellon
  • Global partnerships greatly enhance
    competitiveness for corporate research by U.S.
    companies
  • GOAL CMU as a global research and education
    partner.

9
Carnegie Mellon International Strategy
  • Strategy currently focused around CMUs key
    strengths CyberSecurity and System-on-a-Chip
    technologies
  • Cybersecurity and IT
  • CyLab Athens Offer MSIN degree thru INI
  • CyLab Korea Focused on research with
    investments in Korea and Pittsburgh
  • CyLab Japan Offer MSIS-IT degree in Kobe Japan
  • SoC
  • ITRI Lab_at_Carnegie Mellon -- focused on research
  • Carnegie Mellon Qatar Campus (CS and Business)
  • Carnegie Mellon Heinz School Campus in Adelaide,
    Australia
  • Several Others examples within CMU

10
Carnegie Mellon International Strategy -
Implementation
  • Global Programs integrated within Carnegie Mellon
    not just foreign branches
  • Programs are mainly MS degrees (except 2 UG
    programs)
  • Students are Carnegie Mellon students
  • Conferred degree is indistinguishable from a
    degree in Pittsburgh
  • Faculty either hired by Carnegie Mellon or given
    adjunct status
  • Carnegie Mellon has veto on ALL student
    admissions and faculty hires
  • Collaborative experience for students (joint
    research, design, or project experience)
  • Constant Assessment (both at the course and
    program level) ensures that the quality of
    education and student performance is
    statistically indistinguishable

11
Thank You
About PowerShow.com