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Life in New York During the Gilded Age

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Life in New York During the Gilded Age – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Life in New York During the Gilded Age


1
Life in a Big Urban City in the Gilded Age
2
Characteristics of Urbanization During the Gilded
Age
  1. Megalopolis.
  2. Mass Transit.
  3. Magnet for economic and social opportunities.
  4. Pronounced class distinctions. - Inner
    outer core
  5. New frontier of opportunity for women.
  6. Squalid living conditions for many.
  7. Political machines.
  8. Ethnic neighborhoods.

3
New Use of Space
New Class Diversity
New Architectural Style
New Energy
New Symbols of Change Progress
The City as a New Frontier?
New Culture (Melting Pot)
Make a New Start
New Form of Classic Rugged Individualism
New Levels of Crime, Violence, Corruption
4
John A. Roebling The Brooklyn Bridge, 1883
http//video.nationalgeographic.com/video/player/n
ational-geographic-channel/full-episodes/man-made/
ngc-bridges-of-nyc.html
5
John A. Roebling The Brooklyn Bridge, 1913
6
Lady Liberty Being Readied for Travel
  • A centennial birthday present from the French
    people, the Statue of Liberty arrived from France
    in 1886.

7
Statue of Liberty, 1876 (Frederic Auguste
Bartholdi)
8
  • Inscription on the Statue of Liberty
  • Author Emma Lazarus
  • Give me your tired, your poor,
  • Your huddled masses, yearning to breath free,
  • The wretched refuse of your teeming shore,
  • Send these, the homeless, tempest tossed,
  • I lift my lamp beside the golden door.

9
Jacob Riis How the Other Half Lived (1890)
10
Italian Immigrants Arriving at Ellis Island, ca.
1910
11
Tenement Slum Living
12
Mulberry Street Bend, 1889
13
Hester Street Jewish Section
14
5-Cent Lodgings
15
Mens Lodgings
16
Womens Lodgings
17
Immigrant Family Lodgings
18
Jewish Women Working in a Sweatshop, ca. 1910
19
Hull House
  • These immigrant children playing games at the
    settlement house that Jane Addams founded in
    Chicago were having some fun while also getting
    instruction from a settlement house worker in how
    to be a proper American.

20
Looking Backward
  • Older immigrants, trying to keep their own humble
    arrival in America in the shadows, sought to
    close the bridge that had carried them and their
    ancestors across the Atlantic.

21
Dumbbell Tenement Plan
Tenement House Act of 1879, NYC
22
Dumbell Tenement, NYC
23
St. Patricks Cathedral
24
Morning Service at Moodys Church, 1908
  • Thousands of Chicagoans found the gospel and a
    helping hand at evangelist Dwight Lyman Moodys
    church. Although Moody himself died in 1899, his
    successors continued to attract throngs of
    worshipers to his church, which could hold up to
    ten thousand people.

25
Booker T. Washington (18561915)
  • In a famous speech in New Orleans in 1895,
    Washington grudgingly acquiesced in social
    separateness for blacks. On that occasion, he
    told his largely white audience, In all things
    that are purely social, we can be as separate as
    the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things
    essential to mutual progress.

26
W. E. B. Du Bois (18681963)
  • In 1961, at the end of a long lifetime of
    struggle for racial justice in the United States,
    Du Bois renounced his American citizenship at the
    age of ninety-three and took up residence in the
    newly independent African state of Ghana.

27
Blind Beggar, 1888
28
Italian Rag-Picker
29
1890s Morgue Basement Saloon
30
Black Tan Saloon
31
Bandits Roost
32
Mullens Alley Gang
33
The Street Was Their Playground
34
Lower East Side Immigrant Family
35
A Struggling Immigrant Family
36
Another Struggling Immigrant Family
37
Shirtwaist Workers Strike 1909 - 1910
38
Rosa Schneiderman, Garment Worker
39
Child Labor
40
Average Shirtwaist Workers Week
51 hours or less 4,554 5 5
52-57 hours 65,033 79 79
58-63 hours 12,211 15 15
Over 63 hours 562 1 1

Total employees, men and women 82,360 Total employees, men and women 82,360 Total employees, men and women 82,360 Total employees, men and women 82,360
41
Womens Trade Union League
42
Women Voting for a Strike!
43
Local 25 with Socialist Paper, The Call
44
Social and Political Activists
Carola Woerishoffer, Bryn Mawr Graduate
Clara Lemlich, Labor Organizer
45
Public Fear of Unions/Anarchists
46
Arresting the Girl Strikers for Picketing
47
Scabs Hired
48
The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, March 25,
1911
49
The Shirtwaist Kings Max Blanck and Isaac Harris
50
Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Asch Building, 8th
and 10th Floors
51
(No Transcript)
52
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
53
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
54
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
55
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
56
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
57
Typical NYC Sweatshop, 1910
58
Inside the Building After the Fire
59
Most Doors Were Locked
60
(No Transcript)
61
Crumpled Fire Escape, 26 Died
62
One of the Heroes
63
10th Floor After the Fire
64
Dead Bodies on the Sidewalk
65
One of the Lucky Ones?
66
Rose Schneiderman The Last Survivor
67
Scene at the Morgue
68
Relatives Review Bodies 145 Dead
69
Page of the New York Journal
70
One of the Many Funerals
71
Protestors March to City Hall
72
Labor Unions March as Mourners
73
Women Workers March to City Hall
74
The Investigation
75
(No Transcript)
76
Out of the Ashes
  • ILGWU membership surged.
  • NYC created a Bureau of Fire Prevention.
  • New strict building codes were passed.
  • Tougher fire inspection of sweatshops.
  • Growing momentum of support for womens suffrage.

77
The Foundations Were Laid for the New Deal Here
in 1911
  • Al Smith ran unsuccessfully in 1928 on many of
    the reform programs that would be successful for
    another New Yorker 4 years later FDR.
  • In the 1930s, the federal government created OSHA
    the Occupational Safety Health
    Administration.
  • The Wagner Act.
  • Francis Perkins ? first female Cabinet member
    Secretary of Labor in FDRs administration.

78
History of the Needlecraft Industry by Ernest
Feeney, 1938
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