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Assessment of Preschool and School-Age Children with Language Impairment Ch 3 Owens, 5th Edition

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Title: Assessment of Preschool and School-Age Children with Language Impairment Ch 3 Owens, 5th Edition


1
Assessment of Preschool and School-Age Children
with Language Impairment Ch 3 Owens, 5th Edition
  • Harold Johnson
  • Michigan State University

2
Primary Language Assessment Goals for Teachers
  1. Identify, understand and document students most
    significant language problems
  2. Identify language goals and document student's
    progress (i.e., change over time) in meeting
    their goals.

3
Two basic designs of language assessment
  • normalists approach
  • "...based on a norm, or average performance
    level...that society considers typical of normal
    functioning." p. 71
  • neutralist, or criterion-referenced approach
  • "...compares the child's present performance to
    past performance and/or is descriptive in
    manner." p. 71
  • P. 71 Table 3.1

4
Normalists Approach
  • frequent misuses of...
  • "(a) misuse of scores as a summary of a child's
    performance (b) use of inappropriate norms (c)
    inappropriate assumptions based on test results
    (d) use of specific test items to plan
    intervention goals and (e) use of tests to
    assess therapy progress." p. 75
  • at their best...such tests provide an unclear
    picture of communication performance.

5
Neutralist, or Criterion-Referenced Approach
  • Such test are more appropriate for measuring the
    progress of individual students.
  • Relies upon an observational, or descriptive
    approach of the student's conversational use of
    language
  • P. 87, Table 3.4 discuss this approach, vs. a
    focus upon identifying and understanding the
    occurrence of communication breakdowns.

6
Formal Testing
  • P. 88-90, Table 3.5 Helpful Hints for Language
    Testing
  • Discuss purpose, administration, cautions, and
    applicability with students who are d/hh
  • P. 91 Pragmatics
  • Basic types, story telling topic discussion
  • Difficulty of accessing in relation to formal
    tests, discuss why implications for our work

7
Formal Testing (cont.)
  • Use of formal testing with students who are d/hh
    empirical investigations
  • Accommodations Used For Statewide Standardized
    Assessments Prevalence and Recommendations For
    Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  • When statewide standardized assessments are taken
    by students who are deaf/hard of hearing, the
    three most common types of accommodations are 1)
    small group testing 2) interpreting test
    directions and 3) and extended time. With the
    exception of interpreting or reading test items
    aloud, accommodations were largely used for both
    reading and math assessments. Participants
    perceived all listed accommodations as both valid
    and easy to use. Participants recommended that
    student academic level, communication mode, and
    additional disabilities be taken into account
    when choosing accommodations for students who are
    deaf or hard of hearing."

8
Informal Testing
  • Alternate Assessment Use With Students Who Are
    Deaf or Hard of Hearing An Analysis of
    Portfolio, Checklists, and Out-of-Level Formats
  • When alternative assessment strategies are used
    with students who are deaf/hard of hearing,
    teacher preferences and state regulations
    determine the format and use of the strategies.
    The most commonly used strategy to track student
    progress was student portfolios. Out-of-level
    tests were test rarely permitted due to state
    assessment regulations.

9
Discussion Questions
  • As a teacher of students who are d/hh, what do
    you want to learn as a result of your assessment
    efforts?
  • Given the language problems commonly demonstrated
    by students who are d/hh, which tests will be
    most useful to you?
  • What are the test modifications that you are most
    likely to use in the language assessment of your
    students who are d/hh?
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