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Tobacco

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Tobacco ... Tobacco – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Tobacco


1
Tobacco
2
  • Lesson 1 The Effects Of Tobacco Use

3
  • Quick Start Most people know that using tobacco
    is harmful. Why do you think some people
    continue to use tobacco products? Write your
    response on a sheet of paper.

4
  • Experts say that nicotine is more addictive than
    heroin or cocaine.
  • According to the Surgeon General, tobacco use,
    particularly smoking, is the number one cause of
    preventable disease and death in the United
    States.

5
  • The government requires all tobacco products to
    carry warning labels.
  • Addictive Substance A substance that causes
    physiological or psychological dependence.
  • Nicotine The addictive drug found in tobacco
    leaves

6
  • Nicotine raises blood pressure, increases
    heart rate, and contributes to heart disease and
    stroke.
  • Stimulant A drug that increases the action of
    the central nervous system.

7
  • Carcinogen A cancer causing substance.
  • Cigarettes contain 43 known carcinogens,
    including cyanide, formaldehyde, and arsenic.
    They also contain chemicals used in insecticides,
    paint, toilet cleaners, antifreeze, and
    explosives.

8
  • Tar A thick, sticky, dark fluid produced when
    tobacco burns.
  • As tar penetrates the smokers respiratory
    system, it destroys cilia, tiny hairlike
    structures that line the upper airways and
    protect against infection.

9
  • Tar damages the alveoli, or air sacs, which
    absorb oxygen and rid the body of carbon dioxide.
  • Tar also destroys lung tissue, making the lungs
    less able to function.

10
  • Carbon Monoxide A colorless, odorless, and
    poisonous gas that is also found in cigarettes

11
Smokeless Tobacco
  • Smokeless Tobacco Tobacco that is sniffed
    through the nose, held in the mouth, or chewed.
  • Leukoplakia Thickened, white, leathery-looking
    spots on the inside of the mouth that can develop
    into oral cancer.

12
  • Because smokeless tobacco is held in the mouth
    for a length of time, it delivers both nicotine
    and carcinogens to the body at levels that can be
    2 to 3 times the amount delivered by a single
    cigarette.
  • People who chew 8 to 10 plugs of tobacco each day
    take in the same amount of nicotine as a two pack
    a day smoker.

13
SHORT TERM EFFECTS OF TOBACCO USE
  • Changes in brain chemistry
  • Increased respiration and heart rate
  • Dulled taste buds and reduced appetite
  • Bad breath and smelly hair, clothes, and skin

14
  • LONG TERM EFFECTS OF TOBACCO USE

15
Chronic Bronchitis
  • Repeated tobacco use leads to a buildup of tar in
    the lungs, causing chronic coughing and excessive
    mucus secretion.

16
Emphysema
  • This is a disease that destroys the tiny air sacs
    in the lungs. The air sacs become less elastic,
    making it more difficult for the lungs to absorb
    oxygen. A person with advanced emphysema uses up
    to 80 of his or her energy just to breathe.

17
  • Lung Cancer
  • Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

18
Other Consequences
  • Legal Consequences
  • Social Consequences
  • Financial Consequences

19
  • Lesson 2 Choosing To Live Tobacco Free

20
  • Reduced Smoking Among Teens
  • Reports show that nationally 28 of high school
    students smoke. This is down from 36 in 1997.

21
Reasons For Reduced Smoking Among Teens
  • Antismoking campaigns
  • Financial cost
  • Societal pressures
  • Family influence

22
Benefits Of Living Tobacco Free
  • Lowers risk of lung cancer, heart disease, and
    stroke
  • Improves cardiovascular endurance and lung
    function
  • Increases physical fitness and enhances athletic
    performance

23
Strategies For Preventing Tobacco Use
  • Choose friends who dont use tobacco
  • Avoid situations where tobacco products may be
    used
  • Practice and use refusal skills

24
What Happens When A Smoker Quits
  • Within 20 minutes blood pressure and pulse rate
    drop. Body temperature in limbs returns to
    normal
  • Within 8 hours oxygen levels return to normal
  • In 24 hours the chance of a heart attack begins
    to decrease

25
  • In 3 days breathing becomes easier as lung
    capacity increases
  • Within 2 to 3 months lungs function up to 30
    better
  • Within 1 to 9 months lung cilia regrow and
    coughing, sinus congestion, and shortness of
    breath decrease

26
  • In 1 year the risk of coronary heart disease is
    cut in half
  • In 5 years the risk of lung cancer and cancers of
    the mouth, throat, and esophagus is reduced by
    50. Stroke risk is also decreased
  • In 10 years the risk of cancer of the bladder,
    kidney, cervix, and pancreas decreases

27
Why doSome Teens Use Tobacco?
  • On a sheet of paper, list 5 reasons why teens
    use tobacco

28
Reasons Why Teens Give Up Tobacco
  • They begin to have health problems, such as
    asthma or respiratory infections
  • They have a desire, will, and commitment to stop
  • They realize how expensive it is

29
  • They find it difficult to purchase tobacco
    products because selling tobacco products to
    persons under the age of 18 is illegal in all 50
    states
  • They realize the damaging effects of secondhand
    smoke and dont want to harm their families and
    friends.

30
Stopping The Addiction Cycle
  • Nicotine Withdrawal The process that occurs in
    the body when nicotine, an addictive drug, is no
    longer used.
  • Nicotine Substitute A product that delivers
    small amounts of nicotine into the users system
    while he or she is trying to give up the tobacco
    habit.

31
Tips For Quitting
  • Prepare for the day. Set a target date
  • Get support and encouragement
  • Access professional health service
  • Replace tobacco use with healthier alternatives.
  • Change daily behavior
  • Engage in healthful behaviors.

32
  • Lesson 3 Choosing To Live Tobacco Free

33
  • Quick Start Many communities encourage a
    smoke-free environment in which people can live,
    work, and play. What places in our community are
    smoke free? List the benefits of a smoke-free
    environment.

34
Risks For Smokers and Nonsmokers
  • Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Secondhand
    Smoke
  • (ETS) Air that has been contaminated by tobacco
    smoke

35
  • Mainstream Smoke Smoke exhaled from the lungs
    of a smoker.
  • Sidestream Smoke The smoke from the burning end
    of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar.

36
Effects Of Smoke On Unborn Children And Infants
  • Smoking during pregnancy can seriously harm the
    developing fetus.
  • Nicotine passes through the placenta,
    constricting the blood vessels of the fetus
  • Carbon monoxide reduces the oxygen levels in the
    mothers and the fetuss blood.

37
These negative effects increase the risk of
  • Impaired Fetal growth
  • Miscarriage
  • Prenatal death

38
  • Premature delivery
  • Low birth weight
  • Deformities
  • Stillbirths

39
Effects Of Smoke On Young Children
  • Children of smokers tend to have a higher
    incidence of sore throats, ear infections, and
    upper respiratory problems than children of
    nonsmokers

40
  • Children who live with smokers have double the
    risk of developing lung cancer than children of
    nonsmokers
  • Children of smokers are nearly 3 times likely
    to smoke as children of nonsmokers

41
Working Toward National Health Goals
  • One of the goals of Healthy People 2010 is to
    reduce the number of people who use tobacco and
    the number of deaths associated with tobacco use
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