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engineering and design: Implementation and Assessment of Teaching Methodologies to Empower Student Learning

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ENGINEERING AND DESIGN: Implementation and Assessment of Teaching Methodologies to Empower Student Learning What pedagogies empower student learning? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: engineering and design: Implementation and Assessment of Teaching Methodologies to Empower Student Learning


1
engineering and design Implementation and
Assessment of Teaching Methodologies to Empower
Student Learning
  • What pedagogies empower student learning?
  • How do we assess learning?
  • May 14, 2014

Daniela Pusca, Ph.D., P.Eng. Jacqueline Stagner,
Ph.D., P.Eng.
2
Concerns at the beginning of the course
  • How to make the first year course exciting
  • How to communicate what engineers actually do
  • How to develop an understanding of the design
    processes
  • How to assess the students learning

3
Challenges for The First Year Engineering Students
  • Not familiar with the design process used within
    engineering
  • May also not recognize the real problem to be
    solved and what are the limitations in achieving
    a solution
  • Not familiar with the various aspects of project
    management

4
Learning Outcomes and the Graduate Attributes
Ability to design solutions for open-ended
engineering problems and to design systems and
components.
Ability to to identify, formulate, and analyze
engineering problems
graduate attributes
Communication skills
Ability to create, select, apply, and adapt
modern engineering tools
Teamwork and leadership skills
5
Learning Outcomes
No. Learning Outcome Learning Outcome Code
1 Classify a given problem, and the type of solution sought. 2a
2 Determine primary objectives and key constraints. 2b
3 Identify existing solution processes that can be applied to solve a problem.   2b
4 Extract engineering requirements from relevant engineering Codes and Standards. 4a
5 Apply formal idea generation tools to develop a diverse set of candidate engineering design solutions. 4b
6 Use models to generate a diverse set of candidate engineering design solutions. 4b
7 Apply formal multi-criteria decision making tools to select candidate engineering design solutions for further development. 4c
8 Refine a conceptual design into a detailed design. 4d
9 Create engineering designs Use of CAD tools. 5a
10 Complete a successful project. 6c
11 Illustrate concepts in graphical form. 7a
12 Relate ideas in a multi-modal manner visually, textually and orally. 7b
Problem Analysis
Design
Use of Engineering Tools
Individual and Team Work
Communication Skills
Learning Outcomes from the University of Toronto
attribute tables posted on the EGAD website,
http//egad.engineering.queensu.ca/?page_id1207
6
Evaluation Methods
Method of Evaluation Related Learning Outcomes
Mid-Term Exam Learning Outcome 11
Drafting Portfolio Class Sketches, Laboratory assignments (individual) Learning Outcomes 4, 9, 10, 11, and 12
Design Portfolio (group) Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, and 12
Progress Tests I   Learning Outcome 11
Progress Tests II   Learning Outcome 11
Progress Tests III   Learning Outcome 11
Progress Tests IV Learning Outcome 9
Oral Presentation Learning Outcome 12
7
Methods of Instruction
ISSUES Qualitative Data Qualitative Data
ISSUES Initial Course Design New Course Design
1.0 Course Design
1.1 Traditional teaching methods Yes No
1.2 Inductive teaching methods
1.2.1 Case-based teaching Yes Yes
1.2.2 Inquiry-based learning No Yes
1.2.3 Discovery learning No Yes
1.2.4 Problem/project-based learning Yes Yes
The multitude of approaches that may be used were
mapped against what we want students to learn
(desired attributes).
8
Methods of Instruction
More student-centered, activity-based teaching
and learning
Inductive teaching methods How it was implemented
1.2.1 Case-based teaching Students study cases that reflect all of the teaching points the instructor wishes to convey.
1.2.2 Inquiry-based learning Exercises/applications solved during lecture time (answer desired learning)
1.2.3 Discovery learning Applications during lecture time examination and analysis of given models to discover design concepts
1.2.4 Problem/project-based learning Involves assignments that call for students to design a product
9
1.2.1 Case-Based Teaching
  • Students study cases involving scenarios likely
    to be encountered in professional practice.
  • Example
  • For each case, be able to IDENTIFY the techniques
    used to develop concepts
  • Teflon (Design by accident)
  • So Whats wrong with Our Toaster? (Checklisting)
  • Jokes for Trash (Inversion)

Source Engineering by Design author Gerard
Voland, Publisher Prentice Hall, 2004
10
1.2.2 Inquiry-Based Learning
  • Students are presented with
  • a question to be answered / interpreted
  • Accomplish the desired learning in the process of
    responding to that challenge
  • Example Circular sweep
  • The desired learning
  • an axis of rotation has to be defined
  • location of the axis relative to the profile can
    greatly affect the resulting sweep
  • angular displacements other than 360 degrees can
    be specified

11
Inquiry-Based Learning Contd
Example Circular sweep Challenge Match the
objects with the profiles
Source Introduction to Graphics Communications
for Engineers (4th edition), by Gary R.
Bertoline, McGraw-Hill Higher Education
12
Inquiry-Based Learning Contd
Example Circular sweep Challenge Match the
objects with the profiles
Source Introduction to Graphics Communications
for Engineers (4th edition), by Gary R.
Bertoline, McGraw-Hill Higher Education
13
1.2.3 Discovery Learning
  • Learning takes place not through instruction, but
    through examination and analysis.
  • Example Visualization by surfaces
  • The desired learning
  • to read 2D engineering drawings,
  • to develop mental 3D images of the objects
  • to improve the ability to visualize multiview
    drawings

14
Discovery Learning Contd
Example Visualizing 3D objects Challenge
Match the given surface letter from a pictorial
drawing with the corresponding surface from the
multiview drawing
Source Introduction to Graphics Communications
for Engineers (4th edition), by Gary R.
Bertoline, McGraw-Hill Higher Education
15
Discovery Learning Contd
Example Visualizing 3D objects Challenge
Match the given surface letter from a pictorial
drawing with the corresponding surface from the
multiview drawing
Source Introduction to Graphics Communications
for Engineers (4th edition), by Gary R.
Bertoline, McGraw-Hill Higher Education
16
1.2.3 Problem/Project-Based Learning
  • Problem-based learning
  • Involves assignments that call for students to
    design a product
  • The solution process is more important than the
    final design.
  • Students have not previously received formal
    instruction in the necessary background material
  • Project-based learning
  • Involves assignments that call for students to
    design a product
  • The culmination of the project is a written and
    oral report summarizing what was done to achieve
    the final design
  • Students apply previously acquired knowledge

17
A directed project-based learning approach
Needs assessment
  Implementation
engineering design process
Problem formulation
Analysis
Abstraction and synthesis
18
Activity Characteristics
  • Students work in groups and develop team,
    leadership, and task completion skills
  • Apply what they were taught during the first part
    of the lectures

visualisation techniques
sketching
isometric drawing
orthographic projection
19
  • Students brainstorm different solutions for the
    design problems
  • Present their ideas through a variety of
    communication techniques

visual
oral
written
20
Instructors role
  • Student-centred teaching
  • Provides the necessary skills for project
    management and graphical communication of the
    design solution
  • Promotes positive attitude and group effort
  • Acts as project manager

21
GAs Role
  • Form the project (design) groups (5-6 students)
  • Guide the students
  • Provide feedback
  • Assist the students to access resources needed
    to solve the problem/situation

22
Open-Ended Design Projects Assigned
  • Aluminum can crusher
  • Toothpaste dispenser
  • Ball return
  • Wheelchair vehicle lift
  • Sports wheelchair
  • Multipurpose ladder for home use
  • Multipurpose study desk

23
Communication Assignments
  • Requirements for each design team
  • a notebook
  • three milestone reports
  • the final report
  • oral presentation

24
Feedback from Students Regarding PBL
  • Two questionnaires were delivered in order to
    assess the new course design from students
    perspective.
  • Linear scale used
  • 1not useful, 2useful, 3extremely useful

25
Communication practices- results based on
post-course questionnaire
26
Project management- results for post-course
questionnaire
27
Conclusions Regarding PBL
  • Good aspects associated with the course design
  • Issues that must be improved
  • Interactions with TAs
  • Interactions with team members
  • Positive feedback in regard with communication
    practices - no average score below 2

28
Today, the concerns still are
  • How to make the first year course exciting
  • How to better communicate what engineers do
  • How to develop a better understanding of the
    design processes
  • How to assess the students learning

29
Goal
Exciting
Adventurous
Rigorous
Creative
Demanding
30
THANK YOU
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