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BRIEFING OF PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ON JOB CREATION INITIATIVES IN THE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SECTOR

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Title: BRIEFING OF PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ON JOB CREATION INITIATIVES IN THE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SECTOR


1
  • BRIEFING OF PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL
    DEVELOPMENT ON JOB CREATION INITIATIVES IN THE
    SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT SECTOR
  • 12 June 2012

2
PRESENTATION OUTLINE
  • Purpose
  • Introduction
  • Context
  • Key Functions
  • Job Creation Initiatives
  • Skills Analysis
  • Challenges
  • Way Forward

3
PURPOSE
  • To brief the Portfolio Committee on Social
    Development on the
  • Job creation initiatives of the Social
    Development Sector and
  • Related skills and competencies.

4
Introduction
  • Poverty, unemployment and inequality continue to
    be major challenges in the country.
  • State of Nation Address 2011/12 declared year
    for job creation.
  • 12 outcomes of Government give effect to election
    manifesto and medium term strategic framework
  • Minister of Social Development is enjoined to
    respond to at least 4 outcomes
  • Outcome 1 Improved Quality of Basic Education
  • Outcome 2 A Long and Healthy Life for All South
    Africans
  • Outcome 4 Decent Work Through Inclusive Economic
    Growth
  • Outcome 7 Vibrant, equitable and sustainable
    rural communities and
  • food security for all

5
Context
  • New Growth Path (NGP) developed to drive
    governments job creation initiatives
  • NGP identifies 5 jobs drivers and the public
    service is key in achieving the set targets
  • Public Service responsible for 20 of jobs
    created, private sector is expected to be the
    main source of job creation
  • Of the 20, Health, Education, SAPS and Defense
    are the major contributors to public service job
    creation
  • DSD Ministers priorities
  • ECD
  • Child and Youth Care
  • Anti Substance Abuse and
  • Food for All

6
 Social Development Programmes
  • Substance abuse prevention and rehabilitation
  • Care and services for older persons
  • Social crime prevention and support
  • Persons with disabilities
  • Child care and protection services
  • Victim empowerment
  • HIV and AIDS
  • Care and support services to families
  • Youth development
  • Sustainable livelihoods
  • Institutional capacity building and support
  • Population and development

7
Job Creation Initiatives
  • CORE PROGRAMMES
  • Child and Youth Care Workers (Isibindi Model), 10
    000 over 3 years
  • Care Workers (HCBC programme), 4000
  • Masupa Tsela - 4000
  • Social Assistance Programme (social grants)
  • CO-ORDINATED EFFORTS
  • EPWP
  • CWP
  • SUPPORT PROGRAMMES WITHIN THE SOCIAL
  • SECTOR
  • Bursaries Programme
  • Internship Programme
  • PROCUREMENT INITIATIVES

8
Child and Youth Care Workers
  • DSD aims to expand its Child and Youth Care
    Services (CYCS) using a model known as Isibindi
    (circle of courage), to create safe and caring
    communities in the context of HIV, AIDS and TB.
  • CYCS to be delivered by appointing trained
    qualified Child and Youth Care Workers who will
    provide direct support to children orphaned and
    made vulnerable by HIV, AIDS and TB.
  • Up to 1.3 million children will benefit from
    direct supervision and psycho-social support
    services.
  • Intention is to train 10 000 child and youth care
    workers over the MTEF.

9
Community Care Givers - HCBC
  • Aims to provide comprehensive and quality social
    services in the home and community to ensure that
    basic needs of people living with HIV and AIDS
    are met.
  • Promote, restore and maintain a persons optimum
    level of comfort and social functioning.
  • Trained Care Givers appointed by NPOs to render
    this service (funds transfer from provincial
    departments to NPOs).
  • 14,590 Care Givers are currently rendering this
    service.
  • Intention to increase the number of Care Givers
    to 15,319 over the MTEF.

10
Masupatsela Youth Pioneer Programme
  • Value based programme targeting young people.
  • Aims to engage the youth to become pioneers and
    social activists of change in their communities.
  • Facilitates the creation of future good citizens
    who embrace good values and respect their
    country.
  • General thrust is to promote activism, patriotism
    and social cohesion amongst the youth.
  • Contributes to skills development and improve the
    situation of youth by linking them to sustainable
    opportunities.
  • 2354 youth pioneers were trained to do house and
    community profiling.
  • Intention to train 9,975 youth pioneers over the
    MTEF.

11
Comprehensive Social Security
  • Provide income support to over 15.2 million South
    Africans in poor households.
  • 70 of the budget disbursement happens through
    payment contractors where thousands of jobs are
    created.
  • CSG - contributes to creating an environment
    conducive for child development (99 of CSG
    beneficiaries attend school) and will become
    ultimately employable.
  • Micro/macro economic impact indicates increased
    local economic activity and job seeking behavior.

12
SOCIAL SECTOR EPWP
  • DSD leads the coordination of Social Sector
    EPWP.
  • SS EPWP was launched in 2003/4 and is now in its
    second phase
  • (2009 -2014)
  • The SS EPWP has as at the end of the 2011/12
    financial year delivered
  • a total of 152 109 work opportunities against a
    target of 132 000.
  • The sector has also benefitted from the SS
    Incentive grant through
  • which 22 public bodies will be funded to the
    tune of R27.4m in the
  • 2012/13 financial year.
  • It is expected that 11 969 Full Time Equivalent
    work opportunities will
  • be created through this SS Incentive Grant
    funding.

13
SUMMARY OF JOB INITIATIVES
  PROGRAMME Target Target Target
  PROGRAMME 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15
1. Masupa- Tsela Pioneer Programme   3 325 3 325 3 325
1. Masupa- Tsela Pioneer Programme   100 mentors 126 mentors -
2. Intergenerational Programme 450 450 450
3. CYCW - Isibindi 3 300 3 300 3 300
4. Community Care Giver Programme (CCGs) - HCBC 14 000 19 600 27 440
5. CCG - Supervisors 2 147 2 362 2 598
6. ECD Practitioners
7. SASSA 8952 9175
8. NDA 127 127 127
9. Direct Employment (Persal) 9 952 11 311
14
CAREER PATH
  • Can be appointed to vacant posts of
  • Assistant Community Development Practitioner
  • Social Auxiliary Workers
  • Data capturers
  • Child and Youth care Workers
  • Social Workers and Community Development
    Practitioners
  • Prioritised for Bursaries
  • Social Security allows completion of schooling
    and creates employability

15
CURRENT SKILLS SHORTAGES
  • Skills needs exist for almost all categories of
    staff.
  • Expansion of social development services and the
    introduction of new services for children,
    persons with disabilities, older persons and
    vulnerable members of society propel demands for
    a range of occupational groups to implement
    developmental social welfare programmes.
  • Among the social service workers required are
    social work professionals, social auxiliary
    workers, child and youth care workers, early
    childhood development practitioners, community
    development practitioners, assistant community
    development practitioners and community
    caregivers

16
Skills Gaps within the Sector
GENERIC SKILLS OCCUPATION SPECIFIC SKILLS
Management Skills Finance for non financial Computer skills Leadership, Mentoring and coaching Communication Project management Human resource management Contract management Performance management Strategic planning Supply chain management Report writing Legislation Conflict Management Service delivery innovation Consumer care Risk management Psychosocial support services Social work method such as communities, families, child headed household, persons affected by social crime Prevention and early intervention programme Report writing Social work supervision Basic counselling Early Childhood Development programme Probation work and child and youth care work Statutory intervention Youth Development, project management Training on the legislative framework Community development processes and intervention
17
SOCIAL WORK SCHOLARSHIP HOLDERS
Provincial Department 2012 Academic year Cost to be absorbed 2013 Academic year Cost to be absorbed 2014 Academic year Cost to be absorbed
Gauteng 184 R37,759,063.20 122 R26,412,875.56 62 R14,067,237.66
North West 154 R31,602,694.20 128 R27,711,869.44 71 R16,109,256.03
Limpopo 300 R61,563,690.00 313 R67,764,180.74 359 R81,453,843.87
Mpumalanga 133 R27,293,235.90 100 R21,649,898.00 41 R9,302,528.13
Free State 50 R10,260,615.00 85 R18,402,413.30 55 R12,479,001.15
KwaZulu-Natal 425 R87,215,227.50 496 R107,383,494.00 334 R75,781,570.62
Northern Cape 64 R13,133,587.20 51 R11,041,447.98 22 R4,991,600.46
Eastern Cape 364 R74,697,277.20 301 R65,166,192.98 192 R43,563,058.56
Western Cape 107 R21,957,716.10 72 R15,587,926.56 70 R15,882,365.10
Total 1,781 R365,483,106.30 1,668 R361,120,298.60 1,206 R273,630,461.50
18
Internship
Office No
Gauteng 254
North West 20
Limpopo 13
Mpumalanga 26
Free State 20
KwaZulu-Natal 52
Northern Cape 20
Eastern Cape
Western Cape
National 49
GRAND TOTAL 454
19
Learnerships Implemented in the Sector
Province Name of Learnership 18.2 Unemployed youth
Gauteng Social Auxiliary work 582
Northern Cape Social Auxiliary work Child and Youth Care 37
Eastern Cape Social Auxiliary work 296
Mpumalanga Social Auxiliary work 400
KwaZulu Natal Social Auxiliary work 265
Free State Social Auxiliary work 38
Limpopo Social Auxiliary work 440
North West Social Auxiliary work 863
20
JOB CREATION THROUGH PROCUREMENT
  • Procurement by departments and state agencies
    affects employment by the suppliers.
  • Where imported goods are procured, the employment
    creation takes place outside of South Africa
  • Local procurement, in contrast, can stimulate
    employment in South Africa.
  • New Treasury regulations on preferential
    procurement come into force on December 7, 2011.
    They require local procurement in designated
    sectors and generally encourage use of locally
    produced goods rather than imports.
  • In many cases, increasing the share of locally
    produced goods and services in government
    procurement requires changes in procurement
    processes.

21
JOB CREATION THROUGH PROCUREMENT.
  • To improve the procurement of locally produced
    goods and services, the National Department,
    together with its Agencies and provincial
    Departments have to
  • Develop a strategy to procure goods and services
    from locally manufactured/local suppliers.
  • Develop a monitoring system where local
    procurement can me measured.
  • Identify what goods are imported and which are
    locally produced, so as to find areas of
    opportunity for local production.
  • Use the Department of Trade and Industry defined
    locally produced gods and services as a basis for
    procurement.
  • Communicate their needs to potential local
    suppliers systematically, so that the suppliers
    can develop capacity to meet requirements.
  • Define the needs in ways that facilitate local
    production as far as possible.
  • Enforce the reporting by suppliers on the number
    and type of employment created as a result of a
    specific tender issued.

22
CHALLENGES
  • Enablers
  • Appointment of data capturers required
  • Transversal data systems
  • Stipends
  • Uniformity of amounts paid
  • Availability.
  • Inability to absorb beneficiaries of scholarship.

23
PROCUREMENT RELATED CHALLENGES
  • Suppliers are not registered on the supplier
    database of Departments.
  • Suppliers are not registered on the LOGIS System
  • The suppliers physical address cannot be
    verified.
  • Suppliers do not have a valid Tax Clearance
    Certificate and/or BEE Certificates.
  • Local suppliers located in rural area s are
    difficult to contact. Their details are not
    easily known and as a result their details on not
    on the supplier database.

24
WAY FORWARD
  • Finalise development of HR Plan for the Sector
  • Finalise development of Integrated Sector Service
    Delivery Model
  • Procurement Matters
  • Finalize the procurement strategy
  • Identify commodities that will be required per
    province on both key priorities or otherwise.
  • Conduct joint workshops to potential suppliers
    together with agencies and provincial departments
    covering opportunities and compliance matters.

25
  • THANK YOU
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