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Title: Awareness Level Lesson 2B Presentation


1
Awareness Level Lesson 2B Presentation
  • Hazardous Materials for First Responders, 3rd
    Ed.

2
What Types of Hazardous Materials Are Present?
  • What written resources can give first responders
    information about hazardous materials?
  • How do I use the ERG?
  • This lesson will help answer these questions and
    aid you in determining the type of hazardous
    material present and appropriate actions to take.

3
Sources for Names of Haz Mat in Facilities
  • MSDSs
  • Inventory records and other facility documents
  • Signs, markings, container shapes, and other
    labels

4
Sources for Names of Haz Mat at Transportation
Incidents
  • ERG
  • Shipping papers

5
Shipping Paper Information
  • Shippers name and address
  • Receivers name and address
  • Proper shipping name of material(s)
  • Hazard class of material(s)
  • UN/NA identification number
  • Packing group
  • Gross weight or volume of material(s) shipped

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6
Shipping Paper Information
  • First-listed order of the materials on the
    shipping papers
  • X placed before the shipping name in the column
    captioned HM for hazardous material (X may be
    replaced by RQ when the material is considered
    a reportable quantity)
  • Emergency response telephone number

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7
Shipping Paper Entries Indicating Hazardous
Materials
  • Proper shipping name of material(s)
  • Hazard class/division of material(s)
  • UN/NA identification number
  • Packing group
  • X placed before the shipping name in the column
    captioned HM for hazardous material (X may be
    replaced by RQ when the material is considered
    a reportable quantity)

8
Shipping Paper Identification
  • Air transport
  • Shipping paper name Air bill
  • Location of shipping paper Cockpit
  • Responsible party Pilot
  • Highway transport
  • Shipping paper name Bill of lading
  • Location of shipping paper Vehicle cab
  • Responsible party Driver

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9
Shipping Paper Identification
  • Rail transport
  • Shipping paper name Waybill/consist
  • Location of shipping paper Engine or caboose
  • Responsible party Conductor
  • Water transport
  • Shipping paper name Dangerous cargo manifest
  • Location of shipping paper Bridge or pilothouse
  • Responsible party Captain or master

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10
Where to Find an MSDS
  • Manufacturer of the material
  • Supplier
  • Shipper
  • Emergency response center
  • Facilitys hazard communication plan
  • Shipping papers and containers

11
U.S. MSDS Information
  • Top Chemical Identity
  • Section I Manufacturers ID and Information
  • Section II Hazardous Ingredients
  • Section III Physical and Chemical
    Characteristics
  • Section IV Fire and Explosion Hazard Data
  • Section V Reactivity (Instability) Data

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12
U.S. MSDS Information
  • Section VI Health Hazard Data
  • Section VII Precautions for Safe Handling and
    Use
  • Section VIII Control Measures

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13
MSDS Entries Indicating Hazardous Materials
  • Hazardous ingredients
  • Fire and explosion hazard data
  • Reactivity data
  • Health hazard data
  • Precautions for safe handling and use
  • Control measures

14
Emergency Response Guidebook
  • The Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) is
    primarily for use at a dangerous goods/hazardous
    materials incident occurring on a highway or
    railroad.
  • Explosives are not listed individually but appear
    under the general heading Explosives on the first
    page of the ID Number Index and alphabetically in
    the Name of Material index.

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15
Emergency Response Guidebook
  • The letter P following the Guide number in the
    yellow-bordered and blue-bordered pages
    identifies those materials that present a
    polymerization hazard under certain conditions.
  • First responders should be familiar with the ERG
    before using it in an emergency!

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16
ERG ID Number Index (Yellow-Bordered Pages)
  • Index hazardous materials in numerical order of
    their 4-digit ID numbers
  • Follow ID number with materials assigned ERG
    Guide number followed by the materials name
  • Highlight substances that release toxic
    inhalation hazard (TIH) gases

17
Using the ID Number Index
  • Example questions
  • What material has the ID number 1090?
  • Is this material a TIH?
  • What guide page should be consulted?

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18
Using the ID Number Index

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19
ERG Material Name Index (Blue-Bordered Pages)
  • Alphabetically index hazardous materials by name
  • Follow the materials name with the ERG Guide
    number and the materials 4-digit ID number
  • Highlight substances that release toxic
    inhalation hazard (TIH) gases

20
Using the Material Name Index
  • Example questions
  • What guide page would be used for Sulphuric
    (Sulfuric) acid?
  • Is this material a TIH?

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21
Using the Material Name Index

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22
Initial Action Guides (Orange-Bordered Pages)
  • Provide safety recommendations and general hazard
    information
  • Present each guide in a two-page format
  • Potential hazards section
  • Public safety section
  • Emergency response section

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23
Initial Action Guides (Orange-Bordered Pages)

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24
Initial Action Guides Potential Hazards
Section
  • Describes potential fire and explosion hazards
    and health effects upon exposure
  • Lists highest potential first
  • Should be consulted first, allowing first
    responders to make decisions regarding the
    protection of the emergency response team as well
    as the surrounding population

25
Initial Action Guides Public Safety Section
  • Provides directions for taking immediate public
    safety and incident isolation measures
  • Describes type of protective clothing and
    respiratory protection that should be worn
  • Lists preliminary fire and spill evacuation
    distances for small and large spills and fire
    situations

26
Using the Initial Action Guides Public Safety
Section
  • Example question
  • What protective clothing should be used for
    nitrogen trioxide?

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27
Using the Initial Action Guides Public Safety
Section

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28
Initial Action Guides Emergency Response
Section
  • Covers emergency response actions for fires and
    spills and leaks
  • Outlines special precautions for incidents that
    involve fire, spill, or chemical exposure
  • Indexes materials in groups that possess similar
    chemical and toxicological characteristics

29
Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action
Distances (Green-Bordered Pages)
  • List TIH materials by ID number in Table of
    Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances
  • Include water-reactive materials that produce
    toxic gases in Table of Water-Reactive TIH
    Materials

30
Using the Table of Initial Isolation and
Protective Action Distances
  • Example questions Assume you are responding to a
    small spill involving a material with ID No.
    1953, liquified gas, flammable, poisonous, not
    otherwise specified (n.o.s.) (Inhalation Hazard
    Zone B).
  • What is the initial isolation distance?
  • What distance should persons downwind be
    protected during the day?

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31
Using the Table of Initial Isolation and
Protective Action Distances

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32
Methods for Determining the ERG Page for a
Hazardous Material
  • Using the numerical index for UN/NA ID numbers
  • Using the alphabetical index for chemical names
  • Using the Table of Placards and Initial Response
    Guides

33
General Types of Hazards Found on Each Guide Page
  • Fire and explosion hazard
  • Health hazard

34
Small Spills vs. Large Spills
  • Small spill A spill that involves a single,
    small package (such as a drum containing up to
    approximately 53 gallons 200 L, a small
    cylinder, or a small leak from a large package
  • Large spill A spill that involves a spill from
    a large package, or multiple spills from many
    small packages

35
Initial Isolation Distance
  • Distance within which all persons are considered
    for evacuation in all directions from the actual
    spill/leak source

36
Protective Action Distance
  • A downwind distance from a spill/leak source
    within which protective actions should be
    implemented (steps taken to preserve the health
    and safety of emergency responders and the public)

37
Inventory Records and Facility Documents
  • Chemical Inventory Lists (CILs)
  • Hazard Communication Standard requires U.S.
    employers to maintain CILs
  • Contain information about locations of materials
    within a facility
  • Useful in identifying containers that have been
    damaged or missing labels or markings

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38
Inventory Records and Facility Documents
  • Other documents and records
  • Shipping and receiving documents
  • Inventory records
  • Risk management and hazardous communication plans
  • Chemical inventory reports

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39
Limitations of Using Senses to Detect Hazardous
Materials
  • All but vision require close contact with
    hazardous material in order to hear, smell,
    taste, or feel it.
  • Deliberately using the human senses to detect the
    presence of hazardous materials is both
    unreliable and unsafe.

40
  • WARNING
  • Deliberately using the human senses to detect
    the presence of hazardous materials is both
    unreliable and unsafe. It could kill you!

41
Equipment That May Indicate Hazardous Materials
Presence
  • Loading/unloading facilities
  • Forklifts
  • Dollies and hand trucks
  • Booms
  • A-frames
  • Ramps
  • Assorted riggings
  • Loading docks
  • Fume hood vents or chemical exhaust stacks
  • Spray rigs

42
Visible Physical Actions or Chemical Reactions
Indicating Haz Mat
  • Spreading vapor cloud or smoke
  • Unusual colored smoke
  • Flames
  • Melting gloves
  • Changes in vegetation
  • Container deterioration

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43
Visible Physical Actions or Chemical Reactions
Indicating Haz Mat
  • Bulging containers
  • Dead or dying birds, animals, insects, or fish
  • Discoloration of valves or piping
  • Sick humans

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44
Difficulties in Determining Names of Hazardous
Materials
  • Fires or explosions can destroy shipping papers,
    labels, and other markings
  • Shipments may contain mixed loads
  • Shipments may contain quantities of materials so
    small that placards are not required
  • Facilities may not be in compliance with
    regulations requiring MSDSs

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45
Difficulties in Determining Names of Hazardous
Materials
  • Mistakes can be made in labeling and placarding
  • Responders may be unable to get close enough to
    the material or container to make an accurate
    identification

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46
Summary
  • Written resources are an important tool in
    helping first responders identify hazardous
    materials. Important written resources include
    MSDSs, shipping papers, the ERG, as well as other
    inventory records, facility documents, signs,
    markings, container shapes, and labels.
  • First responders should know where to find
    written resources identifying hazardous materials
    in both fixed facility and transportation
    incidents.

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47
Summary
  • The ERG is a primary guide to aid first
    responders in identifying hazardous materials.
    First responders should be familiar with and know
    how to use the ERG before an incident.
  • The presence of hazardous materials may also be
    indicated by equipment or by visible physical
    actions or chemical reactions.

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48
Homework
  • 1. Which of the following would be a written
    resource for obtaining the names of hazardous
    materials in fixed facilities?
  • A. ERG B. Bill of lading C. Waybill/consist
    D. MSDSs
  • 2. Which of the following entries on shipping
    papers indicates the presence of hazardous
    materials?
  • A. Packing group B. Receivers name and
    address
  • C. Shippers name and address D. Gross weight
    or volume of material shipped
  • 3. What is the shipping paper name for water
    transport?
  • A. Air bill B. Bill of lading C.
    Waybill/consist D. Dangerous cargo manifest
  • 4. What section of the MSDS provides information
    on special fire-fighting procedures?
  • A. Reactivity data B. Control measures
  • C. Fire and explosion hazard data D. Physical
    and chemical characteristics

49
Homework
  • 5. What section of the MSDS provides information
    on routes of entry?
  • A. Reactivity data B. Control measures
  • C. Health hazard data D. Physical and chemical
    characteristics
  • 6. What section of the ERG provides directions
    for taking immediate public safety and incident
    isolation measures?
  • A. ID Number Index B. Material Name Index
  • C. Initial Action Guides D. White Pages
  • 7. What section of the ERG has blue-bordered
    pages?
  • A. ID Number Index B. Material Name Index
  • C. Initial Action Guides
  • D. Table of Initial Isolation and Protective
    Action Distances

50
Homework
  • 8. How many methods are there for determining the
    ERG page for a hazardous material?
  • A. One B. Two C. Three D. Four
  • 9. Which of the following refers to a spill
    involving multiple packages?
  • A. Primary spill B. Secondary spill C.
    Small spill D. Large spill
  • 10. What is the distance within which all persons
    are considered for evacuation in all directions
    from the actual spill/leak source?
  • A. Initial isolation distance B. Protective
    action distance
  • C. Primary isolation distance D. Public boundary
    distance

51
Awareness Level Lesson 2B Presentation
  • Hazardous Materials for First Responders, 3rd
    Ed.
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