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Title: Part I The Larger Purpose of Accreditation Part II The New Accreditation Model (including the new Dashboard) Part IIIVisiting Committee Report Part IV On-Site Visit Part V Questions and


1
(No Transcript)
2
Part I The Larger Purpose of Accreditation
Part II The New Accreditation
Model (including the new Dashboard) Part
III Visiting Committee Report
Part IV On-Site Visit Part
V Questions and Discussion
3
I. The Larger Purpose of Accreditation
  • Creditum something entrusted to another
  • Accreditation trustworthiness
  • History until 1960s UC and colleges accredited
    schools
  • Accreditation assumes value in
  • Self-reflection
  • Observations, judgments of professional peers
  • Ethic of continuous improvement
  • Tensions
  • Filling out a tax return vs. opportunity for
    growth
  • Unique mission vs. general standards
  • Spending minimal time vs. cultivating depth of
    thought
  • Benefits
  • Viewpoint shift from silos to broad
    (complicated) view
  • Generation/analysis of information and moments of
    truth
  • Looking with new eyes professional feedback
  • Catalyst for needed change/improvement

4
I. The Larger Purpose of Accreditation
  • Creditum something entrusted to another
  • Accreditation trustworthiness
  • History until 1960s UC and colleges accredited
    schools
  • Accreditation assumes value in
  • Self-reflection
  • Observations, judgments of professional peers
  • Ethic of continuous improvement
  • Tensions
  • Filling out a tax return vs. opportunity for
    growth
  • Unique mission vs. general standards
  • Spending minimal time vs. cultivating depth of
    thought
  • Benefits
  • Viewpoint shift from silos to broad
    (complicated) view
  • Generation/analysis of information and moments of
    truth
  • Looking with new eyes professional feedback
  • Catalyst for needed change/improvement

5
I. The Larger Purpose of Accreditation
  • Creditum something entrusted to another
  • Accreditation trustworthiness
  • History until 1960s UC and colleges accredited
    schools
  • Accreditation assumes value in
  • Self-reflection
  • Observations, judgments of professional peers
  • Ethic of continuous improvement
  • Tensions
  • Filling out a tax return vs. opportunity for
    growth
  • Unique mission vs. general standards
  • Spending minimal time vs. cultivating depth of
    thought
  • Benefits
  • Viewpoint shift from silos to broad
    (complicated) view
  • Generation/analysis of information and moments of
    truth
  • Looking with new eyes professional feedback
  • Catalyst for needed change/improvement

6
I. The Larger Purpose of Accreditation
  • Creditum something entrusted to another
  • Accreditation trustworthiness
  • History until 1960s UC and colleges accredited
    schools
  • Accreditation assumes value in
  • Self-reflection
  • Observations, judgments of professional peers
  • Ethic of continuous improvement
  • Tensions
  • Filling out a tax return vs. opportunity for
    growth
  • Unique mission vs. general standards
  • Spending minimal time vs. cultivating depth of
    thought
  • Benefits
  • Viewpoint shift from silos to broad
    (complicated) view
  • Generation/analysis of information and moments of
    truth
  • Looking with new eyes professional feedback
  • Catalyst for needed change/improvement

7
I. The Larger Purpose of Accreditation
  • Creditum something entrusted to another
  • Accreditation trustworthiness
  • History until 1960s UC and colleges accredited
    schools
  • Accreditation assumes value in
  • Self-reflection
  • Observations, judgments of professional peers
  • Ethic of continuous improvement
  • Tensions
  • Filling out a tax return vs. opportunity for
    growth
  • Unique mission vs. general standards
  • Spending minimal time vs. cultivating depth of
    thought
  • Benefits
  • Viewpoint shift from silos to broad
    (complicated) view
  • Generation/analysis of information and moments of
    truth
  • Looking with new eyes professional feedback
  • Catalyst for needed change/improvement

8
I. The Larger Purpose of Accreditation
  • Creditum something entrusted to another
  • Accreditation trustworthiness
  • History until 1960s UC and colleges accredited
    schools
  • Accreditation assumes value in
  • Self-reflection
  • Observations, judgments of professional peers
  • Ethic of continuous improvement
  • Tensions
  • Filling out a tax return vs. opportunity for
    growth
  • Unique mission vs. general standards
  • Spending minimal time vs. cultivating depth of
    thought
  • Benefits
  • Viewpoint shift from silos to broad
    (complicated) view
  • Generation/analysis of information and moments of
    truth
  • Looking with new eyes professional feedback
  • Catalyst for needed change/improvement

9
II. New Accreditation Model
  • Accreditation process should reflect independent
    school realities and priorities
  • Obligation to be mission driven
  • Centrality of teaching and learning
  • Impact of school climate and culture
  • Nature of leadership and change
  • Self-study report has been streamlined by
  • reducing , improving quality, of questions (201
    vs. 134)
  • Integrating appendices/statistical supplement
  • Intent is to promote reflection analysis

10
New Self-Study Process includes
  • Reconceived school description (to contextualize
    report)
  • Increased freedom of individual schools to
    determine organization of self-study process
  • Deferred submission of action plan
  • Provide ample time to create it, taking into
    account committee feedback
  • Provide option to conform to school strategic
    planning
  • visiting team report to respond to reflective
    self-study and to help schools build on strengths

11
New Self-Study Process includes
  • A commitment to assist schools in strengthening
    their strengths as well as addressing their
    shortcomings and growth needs

12
Current Accreditation Organization
  1. The Schools Philosophy and Purpose
  2. The Governing Body
  3. Finances
  4. Development/Fund-raising
  5. Administration, Faculty, and Staff
  6. Students
  1. The Community of the School
  2. The Program
  3. Residential Life
  4. The Library, Electronic and Print Resources
  5. The School Plant
  6. Health and Safety
  7. Action Plan Summary of Self-Study Findings

13
New Accreditation Organization
Operations 11. Human Resources 12. Facilities
Buildings and Grounds 13. Health, Safety, and
Wellness Institutional Stewardship and
Leadership 14. Governance 15.
Administration   Institutional Improvement and
Sustainability 16. Self-Assessment and Decision-
Making
  • Institutional Core Values, Purpose, and
    Aspirations
  • 1. Mission
  •  
  • Teaching and Learning
  • 2. Educational Program
  • 3. Student Learning Experience
  • 4. Faculty and Pedagogy
  • 5. Climate and Community
  • 6. Residential Life (if applicable)
  • 7. Preschool (if applicable)
  • Financial Sustainability
  • 8. Admissions and Enrollment
  • 9. Finance
  • 10. Advancement

14
Self-Study Chapter Format
  • Each self-study chapter has following
  • format
  • Context statement
  • Standard (against which schools will be measured)
  • Indicators (what a school would exhibit if it
    were meeting the standard at high level)
  • Baseline requirements (requiring yes/no answers
    no responses require explanations)
  • Questions (responses needed self-reflection and
    depth of thought are primary objectives)

15
Standards
  • Each chapter has ONE standard
  • Each standard is followed by several
    indicators, which are intended to answer the
    question
  • What would a school look like that was meeting
    this standard in an exemplary fashion?
  • Visiting Team determines how effectively the
    school is meeting the standard

16
Standard 2 Educational Program
  • Guided by the mission, the school clearly defines
    its curricular and co-curricular programs and
    provides coherent documentation of them. The
    programs are regularly evaluated, updated, and
    strengthened in order to stay current with
    relevant educational research, to assure the
    intended outcomes in student learning, and to
    prepare students for the next stage of their
    academic careers.

17
Indicators (Educational Program)
  • The faculty and administration actively engage in
    an ongoing process of curricular and
    co-curricular reflection, review, and evaluation
    across grade levels and subject areas to improve
    student learning.
  • There is clear evidence of ongoing instructional
    planning.
  • The curriculum has a coherent and discernable
    structure that guides faculty decision-making.
  • Instructional resources are appropriate to the
    needs of the educational program.
  • Faculty and academic administrators regularly
    undertake professional development activities to
    keep them current in educational research and
    best practices bearing on academic program
    content and design.

18
Indicators (Educational Program)
  • The curricular and co-curricular programs address
    the cognitive, social, physical and creative
    needs of the students, in accordance with the
    schools mission.
  • The curriculum is designed to engage, challenge,
    and support all learners enrolled at the school.
  • The design and evaluation of the curricular
    program take into account that the schools
    graduates will grow up and live in world that
    requires understanding and leadership to
    successfully address complex multi-cultural,
    global, environmental, and technological
    realities.

19
Sample Baseline Requirements
  • Educational Program
  • The school has a written, published comprehensive
    curriculum guide.
  • yes ___ no ___
  • Faculty and Pedagogy
  • A process of faculty evaluation is regularly
    undertaken and documented.
  • yes ___ no ___

20
Sample Questions
  • Admissions and Enrollment
  • Describe the policies and process by which all
    admissions decisions are made. Who participates
    and at what level? Evaluate the effectiveness of
    this process.
  • Finance
  • Analyze and interpret the schools dashboard
    data that pertains to finance. What are the main
    findings and chief implications for the school
    that emerge from examining the data?

21
Sample Questions
  • Climate and Community
  • Every school is a self-renewing community, into
    which new members students and adults alike
    are continuously invited. Reflect on the
    effectiveness with which newer generations enter
    into, come to embody, and in turn change, the
    culture of the school.
  • Reflect on a time in the last six years when the
    climate of the school became significantly
    challenging. Describe the process used to
    identify and address the problems that arose.

22
Sample Questions
  • Climate and Community
  • Take ten pictures or five 30-second videos that
    richly convey the climate of the school. Please
    submit them with an explanation of how these
    particular samples were created and why they were
    chosen.

23
The New Dashboard
24
The Independent School Dashboard
  • Self-Study process requires schools to analyze
    and interpret dashboard data pertaining to
    various standards.
  • Some schools will lack data from prior years and
    will not be penalized for this.
  • Objective of Dashboard
  • to facilitate schools probing use of data during
    and beyond accreditation process
  • to enable teams to gain perspective, beyond the
    self-studys narrative responses, by examining
    the schools use of evidence

25
Independent School Dashboard
  • Independent School Dashboard is
  • one Excel workbook, consisting of
  • - worksheets for each of 10 data categories
  • - space for data entry
  • - charts that will populate based on data entered
  • adapted from NAIS Trustee Dashboard
  • workbook will be available to download from
    CAIS website

26
Example Fundraising
27
Admissions Data
             
      For September of      
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Applications 200 150 145 200 250 275
Acceptances 100 110 110 100 90 90
New students 70 60 65 70 70 70
   
      Website visits to the admissions page      
  2009-2010 2010-11 2011-2012 2012-2013 2012-2013 2013-2014
Unique visitors 500 500 600 600 700 700
Total visits 700 750 800 800 850 850
   
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Apps/new 35 40 45 35 28 25
Accept rate 50 73 76 50 36 33
Yield 70 55 59 70 78 78
28
Admissions Graphs
29
Admissions Graphs
30
In addition
  • Worksheets on
  • Annual budget
  • Enrollment by grade
  • Endowmentdebt ratio
  • Student attrition
  • Tuition
  • Financial aid
  • Faculty compensation
  • Staffing

31
Interpreting Data Reference Points
  • For context in interpreting dashboard data, visit
    NAIS website to obtain CAIS statistical summary
  • NAIS.org gt Analyze gt Facts at a Glance gt
    California Association of independent Schools gt
    then choose most recent year
  • http//www.nais.org/Articles/Documents/CAISCAFacts
    AtAGlance201213.pdf
  • Averages and medians available for enrollment,
    diversity, fundraising, class size,
    income/expense, salaries and more

32
III. The Visiting Committee Report
  • Visiting Committee Report (VCR) includes these
    components
  • Introduction
  • Schools profile, exactly as written by school in
    its self-study
  • Visiting Committees commentary regarding school
    and its written profile
  • Assessment of progress report
  • Comments on self-study process
  • Assessment of schools performance with regard to
    16 accreditation standards
  • ?

33
Format for Assessment of Standards
  • Section Reports
  • Each of 6 sections include
  • Context statement (which can include significant
    opportunities and challenges, along with guiding
    questions to promote further self-reflection)
  • Notable strengths
  • Recommendations
  • Ratings for all chapter standards (highly
    effective, effective, somewhat effective, or
    ineffective) included in each section

34
The Visiting Committee Report
  • Summary Listings
  • Major Recommendations
  • Number the recommendations
  • Include citations
  • 16 chapter ratings
  • Documentation and Justification Statement
  • Recommendation to Board of Standards regarding
    Status of Accreditation
  • Thorough statement of rationale

35
Visiting Committee Report
  • Recommendation to CAIS Board of Standards and
    WASC Commission
  • Formerly Terms of 6, 6R, 3, 2, 1
  • Currently
  • 7-year cycle
  • Accreditation Status
  • 7 years, with
  • mid-term progress report
  • mid-term progress report and visit
  • mid-term progress report, visit, and additional
    requirements
  • Probationary Status
  • 2-year urgent change needed
  • 1-year immediate change needed

36
IV. The On-Site Visit
  • Activating the committee
  • Chair initiates personal contact with team
    members
  • Members identify areas of interest and expertise
  • Chair organizes committees work after consulting
    with Head of School
  • Well ahead of the visit, team members must
  • Review accreditation manual
  • Read self-study
  • Draft initial responses
  • Chair maintains contact and sends reminders
  • Be prudent stewards with regard to expenses
  • Team identity
  • Most appropriate role tactful and truthful
    observers and reporters
  • Be mindful of how team is perceived by the school

37
The On-Site Visit
  • Interviews and Observations
  • Organization of interviews depends on schools
    self-study committee structure
  • Goal is to generate insightful, constructive
    conversation
  • Attention should be paid to consistency between
    stated mission and lived realities
  • Team members should compare notes on their
    initial/evolving impressions
  • Classroom visits are encouraged but not required
  • Challenges
  • Over- or under-involved head
  • Requests for individual hearings
  • Avoiding rushed writing
  • What status are we getting?
  • no time for promises
  • Role of CAIS Boards of Standards and Board of
    Directors

38
Revised CAIS Policies
  • Code of Ethics
  • Statement of Fundamental Membership Requirements

39
  • V. Questions and Discussion

40
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Sample Strengths
  • The schools mission, which is especially clear
    and inspiring in conveying the institutions core
    values, is a central and powerful strength of the
    school. In an era when many independent schools
    have felt compelled to construct and fund-raise
    for impressive facilities that rival those of
    small colleges, Ridgecrests mission speaks
    eloquently to the values of simplicity and
    love for the outdoors, which set it apart from
    peer institutions in a distinctive way. It is
    striking that the on-campus community overtly
    cherishes human relationships and downplays
    materialistic concerns, and this creates a
    purity of atmosphere, in which learning has a
    deep and lasting impact.

42
Sample Strengths
  • Shoreline Country Day School benefits from an
    extremely talented and focused Board, whose
    collective deliberations and actions constantly
    yield high value outcomes for the school. Board
    processes and procedures ensure that it maintains
    an especially effective mix of needed expertise,
    and programs for orientation and ongoing trustee
    education position the members to maximize their
    positive impact in Board work. They
    characteristically bring high energy and
    acknowledged wisdom to seemingly every endeavor,
    as evidenced by their innovative master
    site-planning efforts, a very successful and
    harmonious head search, and a recently revised
    policy that has expanded financial aid.

43
Sample Challenges
  • South Bay Jewish Day School, has, since its
    inception in 1977, been deeply committed to
    providing a Jewish day school education to every
    qualified student whose family desired it,
    regardless of a familys ability to pay. The
    lasting effects of the recession, however, have
    placed unprecedented strains on both the parents
    and the schools financial resources, and the
    segment of the student body receiving financial
    aid has now risen to 55. Financial reserves
    that have been used to balance the budget since
    2008-09 will be exhausted in two years, and the
    school must quickly work to resolve the conflict
    between its enduring commitment to funding a
    Jewish education for all families who desire it
    for their children and the obvious imperative to
    remain financially solvent.

44
Guiding Questions
  • What strategies for resolving this conflict have
    been developed in Jewish day schools in other
    parts of California or the nation, where similar
    financial forces have been experienced?
  • If the school were to alter its historic
    commitment to providing financial aid to all
    families that demonstrated both financial need
    and a desire to have their children attend the
    school, how would it best prepare the community
    for such a potential policy change?

45
Sample Challenges
  • Einstein Preparatory School has expended
    significant energy in the last three years in
    mapping its curriculum, quite an achievement in a
    school where the courses offered (and their
    content) have intentionally reflected the
    personal academic interests of a highly talented
    and exceptionally engaging faculty. With this
    accomplishment in place, the challenge and
    opportunity in the near term is to further
    develop the curriculum so that it systematically
    reflects the values articulated in the schools
    new mission statement most notably creative
    problem-solving, global connection, and ethical
    decision-making.

46
Guiding Questions
  • Are there any exemplary programs in schools
    around the country that emphasize the values of
    the new mission statement? If so, could virtual
    or physical field trips be arranged that would
    allow faculty teams to discuss these programs
    with their creators and determine their potential
    usefulness to EPS? Could a budget be allocated
    for this work?
  • How can the school structure its conversations in
    a way that doesnt automatically equate more
    practice in ethical decision-making with less
    time for calculus?

47
Sample Recommendations
  • That the Board of Trustees, Head of School, and
    Business Manager immediately collaborate to
    develop and adopt a credible balanced budget for
    the coming year, without drawing upon reserves,
    that serves as many financial aid candidates as
    possible, while restoring the schools near- and
    long-term financial viability. (Standards 8 and
    9 self-study pp. 75-77, 83-84 interviews with
    Finance Committee and administrative team)

48
Sample Recommendations
  • That the faculty and administration create and
    implement a process and timeline for curriculum
    revision that enables the school to integrate
    such emphases as creative problem-solving, global
    connection, and ethical decision-making into the
    educational program, drawing, as appropriate,
    upon the experience and perspectives of other
    schools, as well as upon the input of the
    students at EPS. (Standards 2, 3, and 4
    self-study pp. 3, 36, 41-45 student and parent
    satisfaction surveys from 2012 multiple
    interviews with faculty across departments and
    with academic administrators)

49
  • V. Questions and Discussion

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