ATOMIC BOMB: BOCK'S CAR (FRED BOCK). Photograph signed: "Fred Bock/28 May '83". B/w, 10x8. U.S. Air Force typed caption affixed to verso: "Tinian Island, Marianas Islands - During the briefing in preparation for the first atomic bombing of Hiroshima, - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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ATOMIC BOMB: BOCK'S CAR (FRED BOCK). Photograph signed: "Fred Bock/28 May '83". B/w, 10x8. U.S. Air Force typed caption affixed to verso: "Tinian Island, Marianas Islands - During the briefing in preparation for the first atomic bombing of Hiroshima,

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Title: ATOMIC BOMB: BOCK'S CAR (FRED BOCK). Photograph signed: "Fred Bock/28 May '83". B/w, 10x8. U.S. Air Force typed caption affixed to verso: "Tinian Island, Marianas Islands - During the briefing in preparation for the first atomic bombing of Hiroshima,


1
ATOMIC BOMB BOCK'S CAR (FRED BOCK). Photograph
signed "Fred Bock/28 May '83". B/w, 10x8. U.S.
Air Force typed caption affixed to verso "Tinian
Island, Marianas Islands - During the briefing in
preparation for the first atomic bombing of
Hiroshima, Japan, on 6 August 1945, a target
study class was conducted for members of the
509th Composite Group." Captain Fred Bock was the
pilot of the B-29 bearing his name. Major Charles
Sweeney was the pilot of the Great Artiste, which
had accompanied the Enola Gay on the Hiroshima
mission. When Sweeney was given the assignment to
drop the second atomic bomb, he decided to swap
planes with Captain Bock to avoid the
time-consuming hassle of removing the scientific
measuring equipment from the Great Artiste. Photo
fluid stain at edges. Fine condition.
2
This is a photo of "Crew C-13" taken in front of
"Bockscar" at Wendover Army Airfield. This crew
switched and flew on "The Great Artiste" on the
Nagasaki Mission. Left to right, Ralph Curry
(Radio Operator), Charles Levy (Bombardier),
Robert Stock (Tail Gunner), Fred Bock (Pilot),
Ralph Belanger (Asst. Engineer), Leonard Godfrey
(Navigator), William Barney (Radar Operator),
Hugh Ferguson (Co-Pilot), Rod Arnold (Flight
Engineer). This photo was submitted by Ronald
Pearson, whose grandfather was a pilot with the
1027th Air Material Squadron of the 509th
Composite Group
3
ATOMIC BOMB BOCK'S CARThe plane named after
pilot Fred Bock.Photograph signed "Fred/Bock".
Color, 5x3½. "Photo by/Hugh V. Morgan" imprinted
in gold in bottom right corner. Photograph of the
cockpit of Bock's Car, the B-29 that dropped the
atomic bomb on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945,
hastening the end of World War II. FRED BOCK, a
retired scientific researcher, piloted one of the
planes monitoring the drop of the atomic bomb on
Nagasaki. His mission was to measure and
photograph the devastating explosion. Bock, whose
plane was used to drop the bomb on Nagasaki, died
in 2000. Ink notations on verso (unknown hand).
Light impressions of writing in upper right
background (you have to look for it). Fine
condition
4
BOCK'S CARThe world is told of the "Los Alamos
Secret".Reproduction signed "Fred Bock", 8½x11.
Reproduction of the front page of the "Santa Fe
New Mexican", August 6, 1945. Headline "Los
Alamos Secret Disclosed by Truman/ATOMIC BOMBS
DROP ON JAPAN". The reproduction is of such a
fine quality that every word can be read. The
Associated Press article begins "The U.S. Army
Air Force has released on the Japanese an atomic
bomb containing more power than 20,000 tons of
TNT. It produces more than 2,000 times the blast
of the largest bomb ever used before...." A local
article is headlined "Deadliest Weapons
in/World's History Made/In Santa Fe Vicinity".
FRED BOCK (1918-2000) was the pilot of Bock's
Car, the B-29 named for him. For the flight over
Nagasaki, Captain Bock and Major Charles Sweeney
switched planes. Bock piloted The Great Artiste,
which was used to measure and photograph the
explosion. He rose to the rank of Major and was
awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the
Air Medal. Lightly creased. Light 3-inch diagonal
crease touches the "Fr". Fine condition
5
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6
The Great Artiste. This photo is signed by eight
members of the crew of the The Great Artiste, the
B-29 that carried out the mission of The
Instrument Support Plane on the Nagasaki strike .
The memory of this plane has to some degree faded
from historic record except among the real
cognoscenti and students of the history of the
missions of the 509th Composite Bomb Group (the
atomic bombers). This plane was scheduled to be
the plane that dropped the second bomb on
Nagasaki but their mission was redefined at the
last minute and Bockscar was chosen as the second
strike plane in place of The Great Artiste. For
several weeks after the second bomb was dropped
it was being reported by the media as having been
the plane that dropped the second atomic bomb.
This 8 in. x 11.5 in. color photo of the plane's
nose is signed by eight of the crew all of whom
flew the Nagasaki mission including Fred Bock (of
Bockscar fame) as Plane Commander and Lawrence
Johnston who signed as Scientific Yield Observer,
Aug. 6 and 9, 1945. That signature is important
in that Johnston was the only man who witnessed
the detonation of all three atom bombs (he was
also present at the Alamagorda, NM test). Fred
Bock's autograph is very scarce and is sought
after by collectors of this era because it is
immortalized by the name of the plane Bockscar
7
F. C. Bock, 82, Monitor of Nagasaki Bombinglt
Published August 29, 2000
  • Frederick C. Bock, a retired scientific
    researcher who piloted one of the planes
    monitoring the drop of the atomic bomb on
    Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945, died on Friday
    at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 82. The
    cause was cancer, his family said.
  • Dr. Bock flew a plane used to measure and
    photograph the devastating explosion. It came
    three days after the first bomb destroyed
    Hiroshima.
  • A civilian observer on Captain Bock's B-29
    Superfortress was William L. Laurence, science
    writer for The New York Times, whose account of
    the mission won the Pulitzer Prize for reporting
    in 1946. Mr. Laurence, in his book ''Dawn Over
    Zero'' (Knopf, 1946), described how the nine men
    of the crew and the plane's maze of instruments
    had melded into a single smoothly functioning
    unit. ''I watched Capt. Frederick C. Bock, the
    pilot of our ship, go through the intricate
    motions of lifting a B-29 off the ground and
    marveled at the quiet efficiency of this Michigan
    boy who had majored in philosophy at Chicago
    University,'' Mr. Laurence wrote. ''I talked to
    him on the ground and I was amazed at the
    transformation that had taken place. Man and
    machine had become one, a modern centaur.''
  • Born in Greenville, Mich., Frederick Carl Bock
    graduated from the University of Chicago in 1939
    and enrolled in a graduate program in philosophy.
    When the United States entered World War II, he
    enlisted in the Army Air Forces and became a
    pilot. He flew combat missions from India across
    ''the Hump'' of the Himalayas. Later he was part
    of heavy bombing raids against Japanese targets
    flown out of China. He was selected for the
    509th Composite Group of B-29's, secretly
    assembled in December 1944 under Col. Paul
    Tibbets, who commanded the Enola Gay, the plane
    that dropped the bomb over Hiroshima. In the
    second raid, Captain Bock's instrument plane was
    dubbed Great Artiste, while his squadron
    commander, Maj. Charles Sweeney, flew the
    captain's usual bomber, which he had named
    Bockscar, to drop the bomb on Nagasaki.
  • Dr. Bock rose to the rank of major and was
    awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the
    Air Medal. After the war he returned to Chicago
    for his Ph.D. in zoology, specializing in
    genetics and mathematical statistics. While
    working at research institutes in Chicago, he
    developed algorithms for efficient strategies to
    solve complex problems. He retired in 1986 as a
    research scientist for Baxter Travenol
    Laboratories, for which he established a
    mathematical model of peritoneal dialysis.
  • Dr. Bock is survived by his wife of 53 years,
    Helen Lossman Bock two daughters, Katherine Jocz
    of Cambridge, Mass., and Heidi Teraberry of
    Arvada, Colo. a son, Wyman, of Cheam, England a
    sister, Gretchen Bock of Phoenix two grandsons
    and four great-grandchildren.
  • The Bockscar is on display at the Air Force
    Museum near Dayton, Ohio. But for all the
    individual medals for their crews, the 509th as a
    unit never got an official decoration. Only last
    September, and partly on Dr. Bock's prompting,
    the secretary of the Air Force awarded the
    squadron the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award,
    with valor, for exceptional service in combat.

8
FRED BOCK. ALS "Fred Bock", 1p, 8½x11.
Scottsdale, Arizona, 2000 March 2. To Ralph
Norman. In part "The men on Bob Lewis' regular
crew you mentioned were replaced on the 6 August
1945 mission in Enola Gay by men whom Col Tibbets
had brought in at Group level. McNamara died in
1978. Rider in 1984. Stewart Williams' latest
address and tel. no. I have...Goodman and
Laurence, who flew with me in The Great Artiste
on 9 August 1945, are no longer living. Enclosed
not present is material on the award of the AF
Outstanding Unit with Valor decoration to the
509th by the Secretary of the AF on 2 September
1999 (after 54 years). I am proud of the role I
had in this. My crew received no special medal
for our part in the Nagasaki mission." On August
6, 1945, PAUL TIBBETS flew the Enola Gay,
accompanied by two other B-29s filled with
scientific and photographic equipment, over
Hiroshima on a textbook-perfect mission to drop
the first atomic bomb. Charles Sweeney flew one
of the other B-29s, The Great Artiste, which
carried scientific instruments. On August 9,
1945, Sweeney led a three-plane mission to drop
an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Kokura.
Because of weather conditions, the target city
was changed to Nagasaki. Sweeney swapped planes
with pilot FRED BOCK (Bocks Car) to avoid the
hassle of transferring the scientific equipment
from The Great Artiste to another plane to make
room for the bomb. Slightly creased. Fine
condition.
9
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10
This is a photo of Col. Paul Tibbets sitting in a
Jeep on Tinian Island. It is thought that this
photo was taken just prior to the Enola Gay
taking off on its mission to Hiroshima.
According to Jim Curran, a visitor to our site,
the identities of the men are as follows on
left, partial face, Lt. Jacob Beser, radar
countermeasures officer partial face in Jeep,
unknown behind wheel, Tibbets standing next to
Tibbets, Lt. Col. John Porter, ground maintenance
officer next with life vest, Sgt. Robert
Shumard, assistant engineer and on right in
black cap SSgt. George Caron, tail gunner. This
photo was submitted by Michael Carol, whose
father, Andrew Carol, was a Staff Sergeant with
the 509th Composite Group
11
This is a photo of Major Chuck Sweeney,
commanding officer of the 393rd Bomber Squadron
and the pilot of "Bockscar" shaking hands with
Col. Paul Tibbets, Commanding Officer of the
509th, just prior to take-off on the Nagasaki
mission, August 9, 1945. The Navigator, Capt.
James Van Pelt, is on the right. This photo was
submitted by Ronald Pearson, whose grandfather
was a pilot with the 1027th Air Material Squadron
of the 509th Composite Group.
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