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CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION: RIGOROUS AND RELEVANT EDUCATION FOR COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS

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CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION: RIGOROUS AND RELEVANT EDUCATION FOR COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS Carol Zygo and Tim Ott CTE Technical Assistance Center of NY * – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION: RIGOROUS AND RELEVANT EDUCATION FOR COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS


1
CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION RIGOROUS AND
RELEVANT EDUCATION FOR COLLEGE AND CAREER
READINESS
  • Carol Zygo and Tim Ott
  • CTE Technical Assistance Center of NY

1
2
Agenda
  • About the CTE Technical Assistance Center
  • New Global Reality
  • Vocational v. CTE
  • College for All?
  • Rigor and Relevance
  • Engagement Dividend

2
3
CTE TACBackground Purpose
  • State Contract to assist SED in carrying out its
    mission of improving the quality, access, and
    delivery of CTE through research-based methods
    and strategies resulting in broader CTE
    opportunities for all students.

3
4
Background Purpose
  • State Contract
  • Federally Funded (Carl Perkins)
  • Targeted funds for state support
  • 3 years - began in January 2011
  • 2 year contract extension possible with
    successful performance

4
5
CTE TAC Work Plan
  1. Improve CTE data collection to create an accurate
    picture of career and technical education program
    performance
  2. Assist schools in the integration of the new
    national common core academic standards with CTE.
  3. Expand CTE program approvals.
  4. Use best practices in CTE for high school
    improvement.
  5. Expand CTE programs and student leadership
    participation
  6. Build relationships and networks to strengthen
    CTE.

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6
7
Our Focus
  • Define a new vision for secondary education based
    on a convergence of CTE and Academics
  • Help CTE identify strengthen the academic links
  • Provide tools and strategies to facilitate
    Integration CCSS

8
Why What - How
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The Challenges
  • Common Core State Standards (CCSS)
  • Next Generation Assessments (NGA)
  • Teacher Evaluation Based on Student Performance
  • Prepare Students for the World Beyond School

11
The primary aim of education is not to enable
students to do well in school, but to help them
do well in the lives they lead outside of school.
12
The Transition of Vocational Education To Career
and Technical Education
12
13
1970s
14
1980s
15
2000
16
2014
17
Vocational Education vs CTE
  • CTE
  • VOCATIONAL
  • Learning to do
  • Job specific skills in the skilled trades
  • Prep for lifetime employment
  • A non college track
  • Apart from academics
  • Credentialed by Diploma
  • Text and manual based information
  • Trade and Technical High Schools
  • Doing to learn
  • Specific and job intelligence skills
  • Prep for employment based on skills and projects
  • College and Career ready
  • Convergence with academics
  • Credentialed by Diploma and Certification
  • Digitally based information
  • All schools and all students

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1970s
20
2014
21
Why - What How
22
A RecommendationPathways to Prosperity
  • William Symonds Harvard University
  • http//www.gse.harvard.edu/news_events/features/20
    11/Pathways_to_Prosperity_Feb2011.pdf

23
College for All does not mean everyone needs a
B.A. Even in this decade most jobs do not require
a B.A.
Source March CPS data, various years Center on
Education and the Workforce Forecast of
Educational Demand to 2018.
24
In the fast-growing healthcare sector, over 78
of jobs require less than a B.A.
Source Health Careers Futures/Jewish Healthcare
Foundation, Health Careers Pathways Study (2008)
25
What are the Trends in New York?
  • By 2018, New York is expected to have 9.7 million
    jobs
  • 63 OF THESE JOBS WILL REQUIRE PSE
  • SOME 36 WILL REQUIRE A 4-YEAR DEGREE OR HIGHER
  • BUT 27 WILL REQUIRE AN AA DEGREE OR SOME COLLEGE
  • AND 37 WILL REQUIRE A HS DEGREE OR LESS

26
Engagement Crisis
  • Lack of meaningful exposure to career experiences
    to begin developing personal career aspirations
  • Core academic classes that are highly abstracted
    and devoid of engagement and relevance
  • Lack hope for future after high school.

27
  • College and Career Ready
  • --the new vernacular regarding
  • high school graduation

28
  • National Governors Association Center for Best
    Practices (NGA Center)
  • Council of Chief State School Officers
    (CCSSO)Achieve
  • ACT
  • and the College Board
  • common core of standards that are
    internationally benchmarked, aligned with work
    and post-secondary education expectations, and
    inclusive of the higher order skills that
    students need

29
Janet B. Bray, Executive Director of the
Association for Career and Technical Education
stated,
  • We are pleased that both college
  • and career readiness have been
  • considered as the standards were
  • developed and view this work as
  • foundational in the effort to address
  • the full range of academic, employ-
  • ability and technical skills that
  • students need to be successful.

30
What is college and career ready?
  • To become college and career ready, students in
    New York should have preparation in three major
    skill areas core academic skills, employability
    skills, and at least some technical, job specific
    skills allowing them to seamlessly transition to
    an entry level position and/or a post-secondary
    credentialing program (apprenticeship, licensure,
    community or 4-year college).
  • ,

31
.What is college and career ready?
  • In order to make this happen students should
  • possess the specific academic skills appropriate
    for and foundational to the career they wish to
    pursue,
  • be able to apply academic skills to situations in
    the increasingly sophisticated workplace and
    society
  • develop individual college and career plans with
    academic core requirements and course choices
    appropriate to their plans.
  • explore and understand the academic and skill
    requirements for their selected career cluster.

32
Even with high demand for qualified workers, many
of our college graduates are unable to find work
commensurate with their education. What is wrong
with this picture?
33
  • The future U.S. workforce is hereand it is
    woefully ill-prepared for the demands of todays
    (and tomorrows) workplace.
  • Study by The Conference Board, Corporate Voices
    for Working Families, Partnership for 21st
    Century Skills, and the Society for Human
    Resource Management

34
  • Surveyed over 400 employers across the United
    State
  • Articulate the skill sets that recently hired
    entrants need to succeed in the workplace.
  • Among the most important skills cited by
    employers
  • Professionalism/Work Ethic
  • Oral and Written Communications
  • Teamwork/Collaboration and
  • Critical Thinking/Problem Solving

35
The results of this study leave little doubt that
improvements are needed in the readiness of new
workforce entrants,
  • High School Graduates are
  • Deficient in the basic knowledge and skills of
    Writing in English, Mathematics, and Reading
    Comprehension,
  • Deficient in Written Communications and
    Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, both of which
    may be dependent on basic knowledge and skills,
  • Deficient in Professionalism/Work Ethic, and
  • Adequate in three very important applied
    skills Information Technology Application,
    Diversity, and Teamwork/Collaboration.
  •  

36
College for All?
  • College
  • Other Options
  • Community College
  • Bachelors Programs
  • Technical School
  • Apprenticeships
  • Corporate Training
  • Military
  • Certificate programs

37
College Completion in NYS
  • 23 who enter complete community college in 3
    years (2004 Cohort)
  • Only 61 entered the second semester
  • 34 who enter community college complete in 10
    years (1997 Cohort)
  • 58 who enter a four year college complete
    bachelors degree programs in 6 years
  • NYSED and the College Board

38
College for all might be the mantra, but the
hard reality is that fewer than one in three
young people achieve the dream
  • The underlying assumption has been that an
    academic, classroom-based approach is capable of
    preparing nearly all adolescents and young adults
    for success in the 21st century
  • But after 20 years of effort, and billions of
    dollars the time has come for an honest
    assessment.
  • Marginal gains in the bottom line measure of
    success-college completion. We have still been
    unable to get more than 30 percent of young
    adults to earn a bachelors degree by their
    mid-20s.
  • The College Completion Agenda-Pathways to
    Prosperity

39
Value of a Post Secondary DiplomaGeorgetown
Center in Pathways to Prosperity
  • Middle Skill with Certificates
  • Compensation
  • Plumber
  • Electrician
  • Construction Manager
  • Dental Hygienist
  • Paralegal
  • Policy Officer
  • Licensed Practical Nurse
  • others
  • Premium over High School diploma
  • Pay more than many jobs held by BA graduates

40
  • Only 30 of young adults earn a bachelors degree
    by their mid-20s
  • 27 of those with post secondary licenses or
    certificates -credentials short of an associates
    degree earn more than an average bachelors
    degree recipient
  • By 2018 there will be 8 million openings in blue
    collar fields and 2.7 million will require a post
    secondary credential. This type of education-as
    opposed to a BA-is a ticket to a well-paying job

41
Why - What - How
  • Rigor
  • Relevance
  • Relationships
  • All Students

42
Relevance Makes Rigor Possible for Most Students
  • Engagement Crisis -when students speak of boredom
    they refer to the lack of engagement in class and
    lack of connection between what is presented and
    how it applies to their life or future
  • The Silent Epidemic -high school dropouts
    reported that the most frequent reason for
    leaving school was that classes were not
    interesting.
  • 40 percent of high-school students were bored in
    school because the curriculum was not relevant to
    the real world.
  • Just 26 percent thought that high school provided
    skills necessary for work after graduation.

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Knowledge Taxonomy
6. Evaluation
5. Synthesis
4. Analysis
3. Application
2. Comprehension
1. Recall Knowledge
45
Action Continuum
Acquisition of knowledge
Application of knowledge
Relevance of learningto life and work
46
Application Model
  1. Knowledge of one discipline
  2. Application within discipline
  3. Application across disciplines
  4. Application to real-world predictable situations
  5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations

47
Rigor/Relevance Framework
Thinking /Knowledge
Rigor
6
5
4
3
2
Action/Application
Relevance
1
1
2
3
4
5
48
Rigor/Relevance Framework
D
C
Student Think Work
Student Think
RIGOR
High
B
A
Teacher Work
Student Work
Low
High
Low
RELEVANCE
49
Rigor/Relevance Framework
Problems
D
C
KNOWLEDGE
Projects
Activities
B
A
A P P L I C A T I O N
50
Common Core State StandardsELA - Six Shifts in
Learning
  1. Increase in Nonfiction Texts
  2. Content Area Literacy
  3. Increase Text Complexity
  4. Text-Based Answers
  5. Focus on Writing Arguments
  6. Academic Vocabulary

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CTE Engagement Dividend
  • Student Outcomes improve when CTE programs use a
    robust integrated curriculum aligning core
    academics and Career and Technical Education
  • National Education Longitudinal Study and
    ConnectEd California Center for College and
    Career

59
Priorities for CTE
  • Get to know the Common Core State Standards and
    State Learning Standards.
  • Review your own curriculum.
  • Scan standards and your curriculum for obvious
    links.
  • Review student-level data.
  • Gather feedback from stakeholders.
  • Determine which standards fit best into your
    curriculum.
  • Create curriculum maps, crosswalks, and lesson
    plans.
  • Teach the integrated lessons.
  • Evaluate the lessons and revise as necessary.

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Why What - HOW
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Web Site Resources
  • Reading in the Content Area
  • Rigorous and Relevant Instruction

63
Increasing Rigor/Relevance
D
High
C
RIGOR
B
A
Low
RELEVANCE
Low
High
64
NYS Program Approval Process
  • Self Study
  • External Review
  • Board of Education Approval
  • NYS Education Department Review

65
CTE Program Approval Process
  • Assures quality technical and academic curriculum
  • Evidence of postsecondary articulation agreements
  • Work-based learning opportunities
  • Established partnerships with local business and
    industry
  • Certification of individual programs
    Re-certification every five years

66
CTE Approved Programs Examples BOCES vs. LEAs
  • BOCES
  • Multiple applications each year
  • Use of integrated and specialized course credit
  • Use of collaborative teaching model
  • Majority of programs approved
  • LEAs
  • Few applications each year
  • Minimal use of integrated and specialized course
    credit
  • Majority of programs have not been approved

67
Web Site Resources
  • Aligning CTE with CCSS

68
CTE Educators Need to Know
  • What are the Common Core State Standards that are
    most relevant to my program area and are most
    applicable to my students?
  • How can I create integrated lessons that meet
    these standards?
  • How can I increase the rigor and relevance of
    lessons and student assessments?
  • How can I build a relationship with academic
    teachers that will also help my students?

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CTE Next Navigator
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Thank You! And remember to visit www.nyctecenter.o
rg
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