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Video 2 Da Vinci, a Renaissance Man ... and order the underlying principles of classical art. The Artistic Renaissance in Italy (cont.) (pages 384 386) Section 2 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Splash%20Screen


1
Splash Screen
2
Contents
Chapter Introduction Section 1 The
Renaissance Section 2 The Intellectual and
Artistic Renaissance Section 3 The Protestant
Reformation Section 4 The Spread of
Protestantism and the Catholic Response Chapter
Summary Chapter Assessment
Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding
slides.
3
Section 1-7
The Italian Renaissance
  • The word renaissance means rebirth. ?
  • The Italian Renaissance, which spread to the rest
    of Europe, occurred between 1350 and 1550. ?
  • The rebirth was of the ancient Greek and Roman
    worlds.

(pages 375376)
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display the information.
4
Section 1-9
The Italian Renaissance (cont.)
  • The Renaissance was also an age when the power of
    the Church declined, and society recovered from
    the plagues and instability of the Middle Ages. ?
  • Part of this recovery was a rebirth of interest
    in the ancient Greek and Roman cultures.

(pages 375376)
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5
Section 1-10
The Italian Renaissance (cont.)
  • A new view of human beings that emphasized
    individual ability and worth emerged in the
    Renaissance. ?
  • The well-rounded, universal person was capable of
    achievements in many areas of life. ?
  • For example, Leonardo da Vinci was a painter,
    sculptor, architect, inventor, and mathematician.

(pages 375376)
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6
Section 1-11
The Italian Renaissance (cont.)
  • The upper classes were more affected by the
    Italian Renaissance than the lower classes, and
    they embraced its ideals more. ?
  • Even so, many of the intellectual and artistic
    achievements were hard to ignore. ?
  • Churches, wealthy homes, and public buildings
    displayed art that celebrated the human body,
    classical antiquity, and religious and secular
    themes.

(pages 375376)
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7
Section 1-13
The Italian States
  • The northern and central Italian city-states of
    Milan, Venice, and Florence played crucial roles
    in the Italian politics of the time. ?

(pages 376378)
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8
Section 1-15
The Italian States (cont.)
  • Venice was a link between Asia and western
    Europe. ?
  • Traders from all over the world came there. ?
  • A small group of wealthy merchants ran the city
    to serve their interests. ?
  • Due to its trade empire, Venice was an
    international power.

(pages 376378)
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9
Section 1-16
The Italian States (cont.)
  • The republic of Florence dominated the Tuscany
    region. ?
  • In 1434, Cosimo de Medici took control of
    Florence. ?
  • He, and later his grandson Lorenzo de Medici,
    dominated Florence when it was the cultural
    center of Italy.

(pages 376378)
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10
Section 2-5
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again.
11
Section 2-26
The Artistic Renaissance in Italy
(cont.)
  • The last stage of Renaissance painting is called
    the High Renaissance (14901520). ?
  • The artistic giants Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael,
    and Michelangelo dominated this period. ?
  • Leonardo mastered realistic painting, but his
    goal was to create idealized forms to capture the
    perfection of nature and the individual.

(pages 384386)
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12
Section 2-27
The Artistic Renaissance in Italy
(cont.)
  • By age 25, Raphael was recognized as one of
    Italys greatest painters. ?
  • His famous fresco, School of Athens, reveals a
    world of balance, harmony, and orderthe
    underlying principles of classical art.

(pages 384386)
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13
Section 2-28
The Artistic Renaissance in Italy
(cont.)
  • Michelangelo was an accomplished painter,
    sculptor, and architect known for his great
    passion and energy. ?
  • His paintings on the ceiling of the Sistine
    Chapel in Rome show the beauty of an idealized
    human being who reflects divine beauty. ?
  • The more beautiful the body, the more godlike the
    figure.

(pages 384386)
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14
Section 2-29
The Artistic Renaissance in Italy
(cont.)
Look at Raphaels painting School of Athens on
page 386 of your textbook. The figures under the
arch are the Greek philosophers Plato (left) and
Aristotle (right). Remembering what you learned
about the differences between their philosophies,
why is Plato pointing to the heavens and
Aristotle pointing to the earth?
Plato is pointing to the realm of ideal Forms
that he believed contained reality, while
Aristotle is indicating that reality is found in
the realm of observation and experience.
(pages 384386)
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display the answer.
15
Section 3-5
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again.
16
Section 3-7
Erasmus and Christian Humanism
  • The Protestant Reformation, begun by Martin
    Luther in the early sixteenth century, divided
    the western Church into Catholic and Protestant
    groups. ?
  • Earlier developments set the stage for this event.

(pages 389390)
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17
Section 3-12
Religion on the Eve of the Reformation
  • People were calling for reform in part because of
    corruption in the Catholic Church. ?
  • Between 1450 and 1520 a series of popes failed to
    meet the Churchs spiritual needs. ?
  • They were more concerned with the political
    interests of the Papal States. ?
  • Julius II, the warrior-pope, even led armies
    against his enemies. ?
  • Many people were disgusted with him and the
    Catholic Church.

(pages 390391)
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18
Section 3-13
Religion on the Eve of the Reformation (cont.)
  • Many Church officials used their offices to
    advance their careers and wealth, and many local
    priests seemed ignorant of their spiritual
    duties, especially instructing the faithful on
    achieving salvationacceptance into Heaven. ?
  • As a result, obtaining salvation became almost
    mechanical by collecting relics, for example. ?
  • Venerating a saint could gain an
    indulgencerelease from all or part of
    punishment for sinaccording to the Church of the
    time.

(pages 390391)
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19
Section 3-16
Martin Luther
  • Martin Luther was a monk and professor at the
    University of Wittenberg, where he lectured on
    the Bible. ?
  • Through his study of the Bible, Luther came to
    reject the Catholic teaching that both faith and
    good works were necessary for salvation. ?
  • He believed human deeds were powerless to affect
    God and that salvation was through faith alone. ?
  • God grants salvation to the faithful because he
    is merciful.

(pages 391393)
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20
Section 3-17
Martin Luther (cont.)
  • The idea of justification (being made right
    before God) by faith alone is the Protestant
    Reformations chief teaching. ?
  • For all Protestants, the Bible, not the Church,
    became the only source of religious truth.

(pages 391393)
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21
Section 3-18
Martin Luther (cont.)
  • The widespread selling of indulgences upset
    Luther. ?
  • This practice simply harmed peoples chances of
    salvation, he believed. ?
  • Angered by the practice, in 1517 Luther sent a
    list of Ninety-five Theses to his church
    superiors. ?
  • They attacked abuses in selling indulgences. ?
  • Thousands of copies were printed.

(pages 391393)
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22
Section 3-20
Martin Luther (cont.)
  • The Church excommunicated Luther in 1521. ?
  • He was summoned to appear before the imperial
    diet (legislative assembly) of the Holy Roman
    Empire in the city of Worms. ?
  • The emperor Charles V thought he could get Luther
    to change his ideas. ?
  • Luther refused to repent, which outraged the
    emperor.

(pages 391393)
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23
Section 3-21
Martin Luther (cont.)
  • The Edict of Worms made Luther an outlaw in the
    empire. ?
  • His books were to be burned and Luther delivered
    to the emperor. ?
  • Luthers local ruler, however, protected him.

(pages 391393)
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24
Section 3-22
Martin Luther (cont.)
  • Luthers religious movement soon became a
    revolution. ?
  • It gained support from many German rulers, who
    took control of Catholic churches and formed
    state churches supervised by the government. ?
  • Luther set up new services to replace the Mass,
    featuring Bible readings, preaching the word of
    God, and song. ?
  • His doctrine became known as Lutheranism, the
    first Protestant faith.

(pages 391393)
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25
Section 3-33
Analyzing Visuals
Identify the event illustrated in the painting on
page 391 of your textbook. Why was this event
significant? How has the painter portrayed Martin
Luther?
Luther is posting his Ninety-five Theses on the
church door.
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display the answer.
26
Section 4-5
Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio
again.
27
Section 4-8
The Zwinglian Reformation and Calvin and
Calvinism (cont.)
  • The Swiss and German reformers sought an
    alliance, but they could not agree on the meaning
    of the sacrament of Communion. ?
  • In 1531, Zwingli was killed in a war between
    Protestant and Catholic states in Switzerland. ?
  • John Calvin assumed the leadership of
    Protestantism in Switzerland.

(pages 395397)
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28
Section 4-6
On May 2, 1536, King Henry VIII of England
committed Anne Boleynhis second wife, who had
failed to bear him a sonto the Tower of London
on a charge of adultery. Tried by a court of her
peers and unanimously convicted, Boleyn was
beheaded on May 19. On May 30, Henry married Jane
Seymour.
29
Section 4-9
The Zwinglian Reformation and Calvin and
Calvinism (cont.)
  • John Calvin fled Catholic France for Switzerland
    after he converted to Protestantism. ?
  • He placed a new emphasis on the all-powerful
    nature of Godwhat Calvin called the power,
    grace, and glory of God. ?
  • This led him to the important idea of
    predestination, which meant that God in an
    eternal decree had determined in advance who
    would be saved (the elect) and who would be
    damned (the reprobate).

(pages 395397)
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30
Section 4-12
The Zwinglian Reformation and Calvin and
Calvinism (cont.)
  • Calvins success in Geneva made it a powerful
    center of Protestantism. ?
  • Missionaries trained in Geneva were sent
    throughout Europe. ?
  • By the mid-sixteenth century, Calvinism had
    replaced Lutheranism as the most important form
    of Protestantism.

(pages 395397)
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31
Section 4-13
The Zwinglian Reformation and Calvin and
Calvinism (cont.)
How did Calvin differ from Luther in regard to
achieving salvation?
Calvin agreed with Luther that humans achieved
salvation by faith alone. However, Calvin also
believed that God determined in advance who would
and would not be saved.
(pages 395397)
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display the answer.
32
Section 4-14
The Reformation in England
  • Not religion but politics brought about the
    English Reformation. ?
  • King Henry VIII wanted to divorce his first wife,
    Catherine of Aragon, whom he thought could not
    give him a male heir. ?
  • The pope was unwilling to annul (declare invalid)
    his marriage, however, and Henry turned to
    Englands church courts. ?
  • The archbishop of Canterbury ruled that Henrys
    marriage to Catherine was null and void.

(pages 397398)
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33
Section 4-15
The Reformation in England (cont.)
  • Henry then married Anne Boleyn, who was crowned
    queen and who gave birth to a girl. ?
  • The child later would become Queen Elizabeth I.

(pages 397398)
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34
Section 4-16
The Reformation in England (cont.)
  • At Henrys request, in 1534 Parliament moved to
    break Englands Catholic Church away from the
    pope in Rome. ?
  • The Act of Supremacy of 1534 ruled that the king
    was the supreme head of the new Church of
    England. ?

(pages 397398)
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35
Section 4-19
The Reformation in England (cont.)
  • Henrys daughter Mary came to the throne in 1553.
    ?
  • She wanted to return England to Catholicism, but
    her actions had the opposite effect. ?
  • She earned the name Bloody Mary by having 300
    Protestants burned as heretics. ?
  • By the end of her reign, England was more
    Protestant than ever.

(pages 397398)
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36
Section 4-39
Analyzing Visuals
Identify the details shown in the portrait of
Henry VIII on page 397 of your textbook that
illustrate his power and authority. How did the
king use his position as the only supreme head
on earth of the Church of England? Based on what
you have read in your text, do you think that
Henry was a religious man? Explain your answer.
His regal attire and the fact that he had his
marriage annulled illustrate his power,
authority, and position as the head of the Church
of England.
Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to
display the answer.
37
Chapter Assessment 2
Reviewing Key Facts
History Which family dominated Florence during
the Renaissance?
The Medici family dominated Florence during the
Renaissance.
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display the answer.
38
Chapter Assessment 3
Reviewing Key Facts
Culture The Renaissance was a rebirth of the
ideas of which ancient civilizations?
The Renaissance was a rebirth of Greek and Roman
ideas.
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display the answer.
39
Chapter Assessment 10
Analyzing Maps and Charts
Study the map below and answer the questions on
the following slides.
40
WWWW 4
Henry VIII was married a total of six times.
Research his marriages and make a family tree
showing his wives and his offspring.
41
A Story That Matters 1
Read Painting the Sistine Chapel on page 374 of
your textbook. Then answer the questions on the
following slides.
This feature can be found on page 374 of your
textbook.
42
A Story That Matters 4
How is the authority of the pope evident in this
story?
Michelangelo did not want to paint the ceiling,
but the pope insisted. The ceiling was finished
early to please the pope.
This feature can be found on page 374 of your
textbook. Click the mouse button or press the
Space Bar to display the answer.
43
Eyewitness 1
Click the image on the right to listen to an
excerpt from page 388 of your textbook. Read the
information on page 388 of your textbook. Then
answer the questions on the following slides.
This feature can be found on page 388 of your
textbook. Click the Speaker button to listen to
the audio again.
44
STS 1
The Impact of Printing The Renaissance saw the
development of printing in Europe. In the
fifteenth century, Europeans gradually learned
how to print with movable metal type. Johannes
Gutenberg of Germany played a crucial role in
the process. Gutenbergs Bible, printed about
1455, was the first European book produced from
movable type. Read the excerpt on page 380 of
your textbook and answer the question on the
following slide.
This feature can be found on page 380 of your
textbook.
45
STS 2
Analyzing Why do you think the printing of books
encouraged peoples desire to gain knowledge?
Printing made books much more common and less
expensive. More people would see them and want to
know what was in them.
This feature can be found on page 380 of your
textbook. Click the mouse button or press the
Space Bar to display the answer.
46
Video 2
Da Vinci, a Renaissance Man
Which two paintings are Leonardo da Vincis most
famous?
Leonardos most famous paintings are Mona Lisa
and The Last Supper.
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display the answer.
47
Maps and Charts 1
48
Maps and Charts 2
49
Maps and Charts 3
50
Maps and Charts 4
51
Daily Focus Skills Transparency 3
the Bible
the policy of selling indulgences
excommunicated Martin Luther
Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to
display the answers.
52
Daily Focus Skills Transparency 4
4
Church of England
Lutheran, Calvinist, and Anabaptist
Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to
display the answers.
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