HSTW/CSR High Schools Making the Greatest Gains in Achievement: What did they do differently? Gene Bottoms Senior Vice President gene.bottoms@sreb.org - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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HSTW/CSR High Schools Making the Greatest Gains in Achievement: What did they do differently? Gene Bottoms Senior Vice President gene.bottoms@sreb.org

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Title: HSTW/CSR High Schools Making the Greatest Gains in Achievement: What did they do differently? Gene Bottoms Senior Vice President gene.bottoms@sreb.org


1
  • HSTW/CSR High Schools Making the Greatest Gains
    in Achievement What did they do differently?
    Gene BottomsSenior Vice Presidentgene.bottoms_at_s
    reb.org

2
Key Questions for HSTW/CSR Schools
  • Do HSTW/CSR schools make greater gains in
    achievement than a comparative group of
    non-supported schools?
  • Do HSTW/CSR schools that have more deeply
    implemented the design have higher student
    achievement?
  • Do HSTW/CSR that made the greatest gains in
    student achievement also make the most progress
    between 2002 and 2004 in implementing the design?

3
Question
  • Do HSTW/CSR schools receiving technical
    assistance, coaching and national and local
    school-specific staff development make greater
    gains in achievement than a comparative group of
    non-supported schools?

4
Special Services Received by HSTW/CSR Schools
  • Technical Assistance
  • Site Development Workshop
  • On-site Coaching
  • Site-specific Professional Development
  • Support to attend National Staff Development
    Conference
  • Support to attend National Workshops
  • Leadership Training

5
Comparison of Demographics of 50 HSTW/CSR Sites
and 50 Non-supported HSTW Schools
Non-supported HSTW Sites Non-supported HSTW Sites HSTW/CSR Sites HSTW/CSR Sites
2002 2004 2002 2004
Black 34 37 37 37
All Minority 46 51 52 54
White 54 49 48 46
Parents w/College Ed 62 63 61 62
6
Comparison of Achievement Gains at HSTW/CSR
Schools and Non-supported HSTW Schools
Non-Supported HSTW Schools Non-Supported HSTW Schools HSTW/CSR Schools HSTW/CSR Schools
Assessment Area 2002 2004 2002 2004
Reading 278 276 274 276
Math 295 296 293 296
Science 288 288 280 285
p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments

7
Question
  • Do HSTW/CSR schools that have more deeply
    implemented the design in 2004 have higher
    student achievement?

8
Comparison of Demographics at Low-implementation
and Moderate- to High-implementation HSTW/CSR
Schools
Indicators Low-implementation Sites (n46) Moderate/High-implementation Sites (n31)
Demographics
Minority 50 44
African-American 30 32
Other 21 13
Parents with no College Ed. 45 36
9
Mean Scores on the 2004 Assessment by Students at
High/Moderate-implementation and
Low-implementation High Schools(77 HSTW/CSR High
Schools)
Mean Scores Low-imp.(46 Schools) High/Moderate-imp.(31 Schools)
Reading 272 281
Mathematics 293 301
Science 283 291
p lt .01 Source 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2004 HSTW Assessments
10
Students Meeting HSTW Performance Goals by
Implementation Level
Source 2004 HSTW Assessments
11
Comparison of Measure of Completing Recommended
Curriculum at High/Moderate- and
Low-implementation Schools
Completing HSTW-recommended curriculum Low-imp.(N-46) High/Moderate-imp.(N-31) Desired Goal
Two or three parts 25 55 60
English 23 52 85
Mathematics 22 42 85
Science 44 64 85
Source 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 HSTW Assessments
12
Question
  • What percentage of our students are now
    completing the HSTW-recommended curriculum?
  • What actions can we take to increase the
    percentage by 10 to 15 percent each of the next
    three years that complete HSTW-recommended
    academic core?

13
Comparison of Measures of Implementation of
Effective School and Classroom Practices at
High/Moderate- and Low-implementation HSTW/CSR
Schools
Low-imp.(n46) High/Moderate-imp.(n31) Desired Goal
Engaging Instruction
Literacy 12 15 40
Numeracy 18 23 45
Science 13 19 40
14
Comparison of Measures of Implementation of
Effective School and Classroom Practices at
High/Moderate- and Low-implementation HSTW/CSR
Schools
Low-imp.(n46) High/Moderate-imp.(n31) Desired Goal
High Expectations/Extra Help
High classroom expectations 13 17 40
Quality of extra help 25 32 50

15
Comparison of Measures of Implementation of
Effective School and Classroom Practices at
High/Moderate- and Low-implementation HSTW/CSR
Schools
Low-imp.(n46) High/Moderate-imp.(n31) Desired Goal
Career/technical Instruction
Quality of CT classes 17 16 40
Work-based Learning 48 52 60
Source 2004 High School Assessment Source 2004 High School Assessment Source 2004 High School Assessment Source 2004 High School Assessment
16
Comparison of Measures of Implementation of
Effective School and Classroom Practices at
High/Moderate- and Low-implementation HSTW/CSR
Schools
Low-imp.(n46) High/Moderate-imp.(n31) Desired Goal
Ninth-Grade Transition
None of one practice 59 35
Two of five practices 22 26
Three or more practices 2 39 3 of 5
Source 2004 High School Assessment Source 2004 High School Assessment Source 2004 High School Assessment Source 2004 High School Assessment
17
Comparison of Measures of Implementation of
Effective School and Classroom Practices at
High/Moderate- and Low-implementation HSTW/CSR
Schools
Low-imp. (n46) High/Moderate-imp.(n31) Desired Goal
Goal Focused
Guidance 36 45 60
Completing 4 or more college credits 22 28 45
Importance of high school 27 33 50
Continuous school improvement 15 24 50
Source 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2004 HSTW Assessments
18
Question
  • How are we doing in deeply implementing the HSTW
    model for each of 12 indicators?
  • What actions can we take over the next three
    years that will result in implementing each of
    these 12 indicators at the desired goal level?

19
Question
  • Do HSTW/CSR schools that made the greatest gain
    in student achievement also make the most
    progress between 2002 and 2004 in implementing
    the design?

20
Comparison of Student Demographics at HSTW/CSR
Schools in2002 and 2004
Assess-ment Year n Tested White Black Female Low Parent Ed.
2002 3,536 48 37 52 39
2004 3,599 46 37 52 38
Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments
21
Gains and No Gains in Student Achievement between
2002 and 2004 at HSTW/CSR Schools
Gains for No Achievement Gains (n11) Achievement Gains in 1 or 2 areas (n20) Achievement Gains in 3 Areas (n19)
Reading 7 4 13
Math 5 4 9
Science 14 5 16
p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments
22
Comparison of Implementation Gains in Access to
HSTW-recommended Curriculum
Met HSTW-Recommend-ed Curric. No Improvement (n 11 ) Moderate Improved (n 20) Most Improved (n 19)
English 5 6 6
Math 2 3 10
Science - 2 5 14
p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments p lt .01 Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments
23
Comparison of Gains Made in Implementing
Effective Classroom Practices between 2002 and
2004 (Intensive/Moderate)
Engaging Instruction No Improvement (n 11 ) Moderate Improved (n 20) Most Improved (n 19)
Literacy across the curriculum 7 3 14
Numeracy across the curriculum 10 8 12
Science 7 9 11
Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments
24
Comparison of Gains Made in Implementing
Effective School and Classroom Practices
(Intensive/Moderate)
High Expectations/Extra Help No Improvement (n 11 ) Moderate Improved (n 20) Most Improved (n 19)
Classroom Expectations 4 2 3
Quality of Extra Help 2 2 4
Work-based Learning 5 0 - 3
Quality of CT Class 21 7 14
Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments
25
Comparison of Gains Made in Implementing
Effective School and Classroom Practices between
2002 and 2004 (Intensive/Moderate)
Goal Focused No Improvement (n 11 ) Improvement in 1 or 2 areas (n 20) Improved in 3 Areas (n 19)
Guidance 1 4 3
Importance of High School 0 5 8
Continuous Improvement 9 14 14
Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments
26
Correlation of Implementation Change between 2002
and 2004 and Student Achievement Change
Reading Implement Change 0.38
Mathematics 0.32
Science 0.48
p lt .05 p lt .01
Source 2002 and 2004 HSTW Assessments
27
Why didnt the 11 schools improve on the 2004
assessment?Possible inhibiting factors include
28
Key Questions for HSTW/CSR Schools
  • Do HSTW/CSR schools make greater gains in
    achievement than a comparative group of
    non-supported schools?
  • Do HSTW/CSR schools that have more deeply
    implemented the design have higher student
    achievement?
  • Do HSTW/CSR that made the greatest gains in
    student achievement also make the most progress
    between 2002 and 2004 in implementing the design?

29
What actions can schools and districts take to
accelerate implementation of HSTW in ways that
improves student achievement?
  • Have 15 more students each year complete
    college-preparatory/honors English until 85 goal
    is met. Train all teachers to use reading and
    writing strategies across the curriculum and set
    yearly target goals.
  • Have 15 more students each year complete
    HSTW-recommended mathematics curriculum until 85
    goal is met and train teachers to make greater
    use of cooperative learning, technology,
    real-world problems and presentations by students
    and set yearly target goals.

30
What actions can schools and districts take to
accelerate implementation of HSTW in ways that
improves student achievement?
  • Have 15 more students annually to complete three
    years of lab-based science CP Physical Science,
    CP Biology, CP Chemistry, Physics Anatomy until
    the 85 goal is met and engage students in
    study teams, in doing investigative science,
    reading and writing about science, and writing up
    and reporting orally on lab findings.
  • Align classroom assignments and assessment to
    proficient-level work and define what is required
    to earn an A or a B and have students redo work
    until it meets standards. Set yearly targets.

31
What actions can schools and districts take to
accelerate implementation of HSTW in ways that
improves student achievement?
  • Couple more demanding courses and higher
    classroom expectations with a system of extra
    help/credit recovery programs that works in
    raising achievement and in motivating students to
    work harder. Set yearly targets.
  • Provide students access to higher-quality CT
    studies in high-demand fields that enable them to
    use their academic knowledge and skills to do
    real work and to see meaning in their studies.
    Set yearly targets.

32
What actions can schools and districts take to
accelerate implementation of HSTW in ways that
improves student achievement?
  • Provide each student with an adult mentor who
    assists them in setting goals in getting the
    assistance needed to succeed in keeping parents
    engaged and in acquiring the study skills,
    relationship skills, time management skills
    needed to succeed.

33
What actions can schools and districts take to
accelerate implementation of HSTW in ways that
improves student achievement?
  • Improve the transition from middle grades to high
    school and from high school to postsecondary
    studies and a job.

34
What actions can schools and districts take to
accelerate implementation of HSTW in ways that
improve student achievement?
  • Continue to improve school leadership for
    continuous improvement by
  • Developing a school leadership team
  • Engaging faculty in using data
  • Engaging staff in seeking out and trying out
    proven practices
  • Supporting teachers with quality time for
    planning and with staff development aligned to
    the school plan and implementation and
  • Working with teachers to align assignments to
    standards instructional practices to
    research-based practices and classroom exams to
    assignments and standards.
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