The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6ef43f-YzkyN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University

Description:

... Confucious BRIDGING THE GAP STRATEGIES FOR PROMOTING STUDENT SELF-ADVOCACY SELF-ADVOCACY STRATEGIES CLASSROOM CULTURE What s in the atmosphere? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:105
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 75
Provided by: Jesse170
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University


1
What Every Student Needs to Know Reading,
Writing, Arithmetic and Self-Advocacy
  • The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University
  • Cynthia Tate - Research Associate, Disability
    Specialist
  • Julia Kothe - Assistant Director, Self-Advocacy
    Coordinator

2
Presentation Outline
  • Background of ACCESS Project
  • Universal Design for Learning
  • Self-Advocacy Theory
  • Need for Self-Advocacy
  • Resources available through ACCESS
  • Bridging the Gap Promoting Self-Advocacy in the
    Classroom

3
  • Background of
    ACCESS Project

4
Corys story
5
Background of ACCESS Project
  • Started with Corys Dream
  • Improve academic outcomes
  • Universal Intervention
    Flexible, Adaptable, Inclusive
  • No one size fits all

6
Background of ACCESS Project
  • Holistic
  • Build Skills for Life Success
  • Improve Retention Rates
  • Meet Diverse Needs

7
ACCESS Project
  • Second project, funded by U.S. D.O.E., Office of
    Postsecondary Education P333A08002
  • Partners and collaborators OT Dept. (CCP, ATRC),
    Student Affairs, The Institute for Learning and
    Teaching
  • http//accessproject.colostate.edu/
  • Implementation, Dissemination, Research
  • Winner of 2008 N. Preston Davis Group Award for
    Instructional Innovation

8
ACCESS II Project
  • ACCESS addresses the issue of low retention rates
    among institutions of higher education and the
    need for improved academic success for students
    with disabilities.

9
occurs at the intersection of good teaching
(UDL) and students ownership of and
responsibility for their learning (self-advocacy).
Educational Success
Self-Advocacy
UDL
10
Univeral Design for Learning

Present information in multiple formats.
Give multiple options for expression of knowledge.
S T U D E N T
Engage students.
Self-Advocacy
Know Needs Wants
Know Self
Know How to Get Needs Met
11
  • Universal Design for Learning

12
Clicker Question What is an example of universal
Design?
  1. NASA engineered space equipment
  2. The evening gown of Miss Universe
  3. A suitcase with wheels
  4. Universal Studios

13
Universal Design
  • Curb cuts
  • TV Closed-Captions
  • Suitcase wheels
  • Automatic door openers
  • Text-to-Speech technology

14
3 Broad Principles
  • Present information and concepts in multiple ways
    and in a variety of formats.
  • Allow students multiple ways to express their
    comprehension and mastery of a topic.
  • Encourage students to engage with new ideas and
    information in multiple ways.

15
  • Self- Advocacy Theory

16
Clicker Question Select the definition that
most accurately describes self-advocacy
  1. Civil rights activism
  2. Self-determination
  3. Self empowerment
  4. Knowing yourself and what you need

17
Definitions of Self-Advocacy (SA)
  • Self-advocacy is a component of the advocacy
    movement that is directed toward increasing the
    knowledge and understanding of basic human and
    civil rights and responsibilities and is a
    precondition to a meaningful citizenship
    (Hallgren, Norsman, Bier, 1977).
  • Self-advocacy includes the realization of
    strengths and weaknesses, the ability to
    formulate personal goals, being assertive, and
    making decisions (Martin, Huber-Marshall,
    Maxon, 1993).
  • Self-advocacy is referred to as the ability to
    articulate ones needs and make informed
    decisions about the supports necessary to meet
    those needs (Stodden, 2000).
  • As cited in Test, Fowler, Wood, Brewer, and Eddy
    (2005)

18
ACCESS Self-Advocacy Principles
  • Know yourself
  • Personal history
  • Values
  • Strengths Challenges
  • Learning style
  • Know what you need and want
  • How to maintain balance in life
  • Vision for the future
  • Know how to get what you need and want
  • Setting short and long term goals
  • Accessing resources people to help
  • Learning effective skills

19
SA Holistic Approach
20
Self-Advocacy related to empowerment
  • Astramovich and Harris developed a self-advocacy
    model emphasizing
  • self-determination,
  • empowerment, and
  • social justice.

Arredondo and Vasquez define empowerment
21
More Definitions of Self-Advocacy
  • Schlossbergs transition theory targets
  • Self
  • Support
  • Strategies
  • _____________________________
  • Brinckerhoff defines self-advocacy as-
    identifying and meeting personal needs in ways
    that do not compromise the dignity of oneself or
    others.

22
Six Success Attributes that Correlate with
Self-Advocacy
  • Raskind and Goldberg (2005) targeted six success
    attributes based on a 20 year longitudinal study
    of individuals with learning disabilities.
  • Self Awareness
  • Proactivity
  • Perseverance
  • Goal Setting
  • Using Support Systems
  • Emotional Coping Strategies

23
Self-Advocacy is a function of student development
  • Knowledge of self
  • physically, intellectually, emotionally
  • Greater interdependence
  • Stronger identity
  • Interpersonal relationships
  • Greater purpose
  • Development of greater autonomy

24
(No Transcript)
25
Access self-Advocacy model
  • Self-Advocacy
  • building blocks

Interdependent
Skills
Independent
Knowledge
Dependent
Awareness
26
  • Need for Self-Advocacy

27
Academic Persistence and Self Advocacy Why
Promote Self-Advocacy?

Studies indicate that self-advocacy is a key
predictor of student success. Effective
self-advocates (self-responsible learners) tend
to experience greater academic satisfaction,
higher grades, and have an increased level of
ability to succeed in college and in life.
A campus environment of receptivity and support
toward the development and strengthening of
student self-advocacy leads to improved student
satisfaction and success.
1
1
1 Field, Sarver, Shaw (2003) Self-Determination
A Key to Success in Postsecondary Education for
Students with learning Disabilities.
Lotkowski, Robbins, Noeth (2004) The Role of
Academic and Non-academic Factors in Improving
College Retention. ACT Policy Report. Tinto,
V. (1993). Leaving college Rethinking the cause
and cures of student attrition. Chicago
University of Chicago.
28
Self-advocacy addresses a number of key Attrition
causing factors
Contributing Student Characteristics
Source What Works in Student Retention? All
Survey Colleges, Habley McClanahan(ACT, 2004
Survey Findings)
29
Survey of Disability Service Office Professionals
(Disability Services) CO WYO
  • What are incoming students greatest self-advocacy
    related needs?
  • Top Two Responses
  • Incoming students do not have a strong sense of
    self and disability.
  • They do not know their strengths and challenges.

30
Lowest means from ACCESS SA
pre-survey (Areas of greatest need)
  • Knowing strategies to help with
    challenges
  • Managing stress in a healthy way
  • Time management
  • Life balance

31
Positive change on SA post-survey
  • I am aware of my values.
  • I have an understanding of strategies that
    assist me in overcoming my challenges.
  • I meet deadlines

32
College Success Survey, April 2008 Faculty
(n305)
In your experience, what are the three greatest
challenges facing first-year students? (Top
three responses)
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Developing time-management skills. 78.5 230
Developing in-class skills, such as listening, note-taking, participating and working with other students. 48.5 142
Developing general life skills, facing new responsibilities. 38.9 114
  • Adapted from College Success Survey, April 2008
    Cengage Learning http//cengage.com/trends/

33
College Success Survey, April 2008 Faculty
(n305)
In your opinion, how has the preparedness of your
first-year students changed over the last 10
years?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Increased significantly 4.5 13
Declined 63.9 184
Not Sure 31.6 91
answered question answered question 288
skipped question skipped question 17
Source College Success Survey, April 2008
Cengage Learning http//cengage.com/trends/
34
Self-advocacy/learning communities and retention
research data
Results from INVER HILLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
(Illinois) by Brenda S. Landes, IHCC Counselor
Research conducted by Danielle Ricard, IHCC
Office of Institutional Effectiveness
Students receiving self-advocacy training had a
13 improved rate of retention. Source
http//www.oncourseworkshop.com/Data.htm
35
Self-advocacy and retention research data
Results from MISSION COLLEGE (California) by Dr.
Jonathan Brennan, Chair, Department of English
The Mission College program linked eleven basic
skills classes (English, Reading, ESL, and
Mathematics) with On Course self-advocacy
classes. Following are the retention and academic
success data from the Fall, 2001, semester of
this program.
Retention Rates for Mission College Basic Skills
Courses
  Retention of All Basic Skills Students NOT in the On Course Learning Community Retention of All Basic Skills Students in the On Course Learning Community Improved Retention in the On Course Learning Community
Fall, 2001 65 87 22
Source http//www.oncourseworkshop.com/Data.htm
36
  • Resources Available through ACCESS

37
You Can ACCESS Resources online
  • http//accessproject.colostate.edu/

38
Universal Design for Learning
  • Video
  • Print publications about UDL
  • Training Modules and Tutorials
  • Presentations
  • Research

39
Disability Awareness
  • Faculty Modules Types of Disabilities and
    Accommodations
  • Faculty Rights and Responsibilities
  • Introduction to Assistive Technology (AT)
  • AT Glossary of Terms
  • Research

40
Self-Advocacy
  • Online Resources
  • SA Handbook online (links)
  • Presentations online
  • Other Resources
  • SA Survey instrument
  • Student and mentor training
  • Collaboration with the Center for Advising and
    Student Achievement (CASA) Key Learning
    Communities
  • Research

41
ACCESS Self-Advocacy Handbook
  • Section I -Transition to College
  • Section II Know Yourself
  • Section III -Know What You Need and Want
  • Section IV -Know How to Get What You Need
    and Want
  •  

42
Self-Advocacy Handbook
  • I. Transition to College
  • Plan Ahead for College
  • Promote Self-Advocacy How Your Parents Can Help
  • II. Know Yourself
  • Know Your Strengths
  • Know Your Challenges
  • Know Your Life Right Now
  • III. Know What You Want and Need
  • Develop a Vision
  • Know Your Rights and Responsibilities
  • Find Resources on Campus
  • IV. Know How to Get What You Need and Want
  • Speak Up
  • Get Organized
  • Make Decisions
  • Solve Problems
  • Develop a Support Network
  • Set Goals
  • Plan for the Future Career Development

43
Printable worksheets
44
Bridging the Gap Promoting Self-Advocacy in the
Classroom
The ideal teacher guides his students but does
not pull them along he urges them to go forward
and does not suppress them he opens the way but
does not take them to the place. - Confucious
45
Bridging the Gap Strategies for Promoting
Student Self-Advocacy
46
Self-Advocacy Strategies Classroom Culture
  • Whats in the atmosphere?
  • Intrinsic motivation and the development of
    self-advocacy skills thrive in an environment of
    security and (positive) relatedness.
  • Setting the Stage
  • Building Community

1
1 Field, Sarver, Shaw (2003) Self-Determination
A Key to Success in Postsecondary Education for
Students with learning Disabilities.
47
Classroom Culture Setting the Stage
  • Create a sense of security (for self expression)
    and connectedness.
  • STRATEGIES
  • Use introduction activities (ice breaker)
  • Define expectations and class guidelines What
    Instructor expects of students and what students
    can expect of the Instructor.
  • Encourage self expression through active
    listening, validation and appreciation.

48
Classroom Culture Building Community
  • Encourage student/instructor communication
  • Encourage forming peer connections

49
Classroom Culture Building Community
student/instructor communication
  • STRATEGIES
  • Be approachable
  • The student may need to be reassured that your
    focus is student-centered and therefore reflects
    wanting the best for students in their academic
    and life goals.
  • Show an interest in students as individuals.
  • Encourage the expression of concerns and asking
    questions.
  • Provide options for communication
  • Students may be intimidated by instructors and
    often lack the confidence to approach
    instructors. Options may include email, in-person
    office hours, phone, TA contact information, peer
    groups, etc.

50
Classroom Culture Building Community peer
connections
  • STRATEGIES
  • Peer support/study group sign-up
  • Plan interactive learning activities small group
    activities, partner activities, group projects
    (assign roles for each group member), group
    discussions, etc.

51
Study Group sign-up (example)
NAME TIME LOCATION
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Monday 12noon-100pm LSC, 2nd floor lobby
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Wednesday 5-6pm
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Thursday 12noon-1pm
52
Self-Advocacy Strategies Class Format
  • Provide structure that empowers students
  • Encourage the application of self-advocacy
  • Use feedback loops
  • Refer to resources
  • Encourage interdependency

53
Class Format Provide Structure
  • STRATEGIES
  • Provide course details (within syllabus,
    assignments, test prep) that allow the student to
    plan and take control of their learning outcomes.
    E.g., grading protocol (rubrics), a visual
    timeline of all class test and assignment due
    dates.
  • Give examples (tools for success) and have them
    readily available.
  • Increase motivation for learning by including the
    practical relevancy of course content.

54
Assignment with structure (example)
  • Assignment (increased structure)
  • Assignment
  • Read the scenario once through.
  • Reread highlight the key points.
  • Identify each persons part in the situation.
  • Determine the level of responsibility you feel
    each person had and justify your decisions.
  • Organize and write your paper.
  • Please read and assess the following scenario.
    Write a one to two page paper detailing who you
    feel is responsible for the situation and why.

Additionally, an example of a completed paper
based on a different scenario could be provided.
55
Increased Assignment Structure Expected Outcomes
  • Provides clarification of assignment
    expectations.
  • Improves student rate of successful assignment
    completion.
  • Demonstrates and teaches the valuable
    self-advocacy skill of how to break tasks into
    smaller, manageable pieces (planning and
    organization) leads to increased academic
    confidence.

While the assignment expectation remains the
same, the probability for success increases.
Additionally, students learn, through
demonstration, how to organize and plan by
breaking tasks into smaller, step-by-step pieces.
56
Class Format encourage the application of
self-advocacy (Test prep example)
57
Class Format feedback loops
  • Mini surveys How are things going? What would
    you like to learn more about? What is confusing?
    Do you feel that the test was fair and why or why
    not? For next class, submit one question about
    today's class session.
  • igtclickers (for large classes)
  • Clarification
  • Determine student knowledge base
  • Collaborative learning use think, pair, share
  • Increase information processing

58
Class Format Refer to Resources
  • Refer to resources on campus, websites, people,
    books, articles, etc.
  • STRATEGIES
  • Educate yourself on local and campus resources
    that are available to students.
  • When referring a student to a resource provide a
    name and contact number whenever possible.
  • E.g. students writing is difficult to
    comprehend. Instead of handing out one poor
    grade after the next, refer them to a resource
    such as a relevant book, a campus resource
    office, a helpful workshop, an on-line site, etc.

59
Class Format foster interdependency
  • STRATEGIES
  • Include collaborative teaching/learning when
    possible encourages higher order thinking skills
    particularly among diverse student groups where
    perspectives differ.
  • Encourage students to be self-responsible
    learners through asking questions, being a part
    of a class study group, identifying their needs,
    finding and using resources, etc.
  • Include networking as part of class assignments
    E.g., interview a member of the community,
    develop a survey based on the input of relevant
    professionals, assess the pros and cons of a
    community-based program or initiative.

60
Self-Advocacy Strategies Communication Style
  • Model assertive communication and active
    listening skills.
  • Ask leading questions.
  • Redirect complaints and concerns.

61
Communication Style ask leading questions
  • STRATEGIES
  • Use leading questions when a student is stuck.
  • Identify the real issue or problem, address,
    review/clarify, refer to a resource.

62
Communication Style ask leading questions
(example)
  • Example Scenario
  • Student I dont understand this assignment.
  • Instructor What is it that you dont understand?
  • Student I dont understand what you are asking
    me to do.
  • Instructor What part dont you understand? (I.D.
    issue)
  • Student The whole thing.
  • Instructor Okay so lets go over it. You are
    to write a 2-3 page essay conveying the
    implications of your earlier evaluation of the
    topic in question. Do you understand how to do
    this? (I.D. issue)

63
Communication Style ask leading questions
(example)
  • Student No.
  • Instructor To convey the related implications of
    an evaluation means to make a hypothesis based on
    your earlier assessment of the issues. So, for
    example, etc.. (Address) Does this make sense?
    (Clarify understanding) To learn more about
    understanding this go to www. or visit --- to set
    an appointment, etc. (Refer to a resource)

64
Communication Style redirect
  • Redirect to encourage student development of
    self-advocacy attributes.
  • Self-responsible learners
  • Accept responsibility for their situation.
  • See obstacles as opportunities for learning.
  • Plan and take action to improve their
    situationthey flex and easily adapt.
  • Accomplish their goals despite adversity.

65
Communication Style redirect
  • Student 1
  • Student 2
  • In my last group project I ended up doing most of
    the work. This time I will suggest that we
    establish our individual roles and
    responsibilities from the very start.
  • I hate group projects I always end up doing most
    of the work.

66
Communication Style redirect
  • Student 1
  • Student 2
  • Since my roommate will not agree to lower the
    stereo volume, I am going to the library to
    finish the last part of my assignment. Tomorrow I
    will purchase a sound proof headset.
  • My roommate played loud music all night so I
    couldnt concentrate and get the assignment
    done.

67
classroom strategies In Summary
  • As educators we can encourage SA through
  • Creating a classroom atmosphere that is
    conducive to practicing and developing
    self-advocacy.
  • Creating a format that provides structure and
    purpose.
  • Communicating in ways that empower students to
    take responsibility for their own learning and
    life in general.

68
Presentation in Review
  • Self-advocacy is a critical component of academic
    and life success.
  • With a focus on combining UDL practices with
    student self-advocacy we can increase successful
    academic and life outcomes for diverse student
    populations.
  • As educators we can use classroom strategies that
    encourage the development of student
    self-advocacy skills and attributes.

69
Are you currently promoting self-advocacy in the
classroom?
  1. 80-100
  2. 60-80
  3. 40-60
  4. 20-40
  5. Less than 20

70
  • Discussion/Questions

71
Thank you! Visit us Online at http//accessprojec
t.colostate.edu
  • The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University
  • Cynthia Tate, Research Associate, Disability
    Specialist
  • Julia Kothe Asst. Director, Self-Advocacy
    Coordinator

72
References
  • Astramovich, R., Harris, K. (2007). Promoting
    self-advocacy among minority students in school
    counseling. Journal of Counseling Development,
    85, 269-276.
  • Balcazar, F., Fawcett, S., and Seekins T. (1991).
    Teaching people with disabilities to recruit help
    to attain personal goals. Rehabilitation
    Psychology, 36(1), 31-41.
  • Belch, H. (2004). Retention and Students with
    Disabilities. Journal of College Student
    Retention, 6(1), 3-22.
  • Carey, K. (2004). A matter of degrees Improving
    graduation rates in four-year colleges and
    universities. Retrieved on October 2, 2009 from
    The Education Trust website http//www.edtrust.o
    rg.
  • Downing, S. (2008) On Course Strategies for
    Creating Success in College and in Life, fifth
    edition. Houghton Mifflin Company.
  • Engle , J. Tinto, V. (2008). Moving beyond
    access College success for low-income,
    first-generation students. Washington, DC The
    Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in
    Higher Education.
  • Evans, N., Forney, D., Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998).
    Student development in college Theory, research,
    and practice. San Francisco, CA Jossey-Bass
    Publishers

73
References
  • Feldman, R. (2009) POWER Learning Strategies for
    Success in College and Life, fourth edition.
    McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
  • Field, Sarver, Shaw (2003) Self-Determination A
    Key to Success in Postsecondary Education for
    Students with learning Disabilities. Remedial and
    Special Education, volume 24, number 6.
  • Habley, McClanahan (2004) What Works in Student
    Retention? All Survey Colleges. ACT, 2004 Survey
    Findings.
  • Lancaster, P., Schumaker, J., Deshler, D.
    (2002). The development and validation of an
    interactive hypermedia program for teaching a
    self-advocacy strategy to students with
    disabilities. Learning Disability Quarterly, 25,
    277-302.
  • Lotkowski, V., Robbins, S., Noeth, R. (2004).
    The role of academic and non-academic factors in
    improving college retention ACT policy report,
    Iowa City, IA ACT Inc.
  • MacDonald, R.B Bernardo, C. (2005).
    Reconceptualizing diversiy in higher education
    borderlands research program. Journal of
    Developmental Education, 29 (1), 2-43.
  • On Course, 2001, Source http//www.oncourseworksh
    op.com/Data.htm
  • Pascarella, E., Pierson, C., Wolniak, G.,
    Terenzini, P. (2004). First-generation college
    students Additional evidence on college
    experiences and outcomes. The Journal of Higher
    Education, 75(3), 249-284.

74
References
  • Retention Working Group (2006) A Plan for
    Excellence enhancing undergraduate education and
    student success. Colorado State University.
  • Sarver, Shaw (2003) Self-Determination A Key to
    Success in Postsecondary Education for Students
    with learning Disabilities.
  • Snyder, T.D., Dillow, S.A., Hoffman, C.M.
    (2009). Digest of Education Statistics 2008(NCES
    2009-020). National Center for Education
    Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences,
    U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC.
  • Test, D., Fowler, C., Brewer, D., Wood, W.
    (2005). A content and methodological review of
    self-advocacy studies. Exceptional Children,
    72(1), 101-125. Field,
  • Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college Rethinking the
    cause and cures of student attrition. Chicago
    University of Chicago.
  • Wehmeyer, M. (1999). A functional model of
    self-determination Describing development and
    implementing instruction. Focus on Autism and
    Other Developmental Disabilities, 14(1), 53-61.
  • Wehmeyer, M., Bersani Jr., H., Gagne, R. (2000)
    Riding the third wave Self- determination and
    self-advocacy in the 21st century. Focus on
    Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities,
    15(2), 106-115.
About PowerShow.com