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COMPLEMENTS

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00 FINDING COMPLEMENTS First find the verb and label it action or linking. VERBS THAT MAY BE LINKING Be verbs: am, is, are, was, were, be, being, been Five senses ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: COMPLEMENTS


1
00
COMPLEMENTS
2
FINDING COMPLEMENTS
  • First find the verb and label it action or
    linking.

3
VERBS THAT MAY BE LINKING
  • Be verbs am, is, are, was, were, be, being,
    been
  • Five senses look, taste, smell, sound, feel
  • BRATSS GROW become, remain, appear, turn, stay,
    seem, grow

4
WAYS TO TELL IF THESE ARE ACTION OR LINKING
  • Does the main word after the verb describe or
    rename the subject?
  • Can you substitute a form of the verb seem or be
    (was, were) for the verb?

5
ACTION OR LINKING
  • Jennifer tasted the salty pie. 1.
    Does pie rename or describe Jennifer?
    2. Can you substitute seemed or was for
    tasted?
  • If you cant do both of these, it is action.

6
ACTION OR LINKING
  • The newly baked pie tasted salty. 1. Does salty
    describe pie? 2. Can you substitute seemed or
    was for tasted?
  • If the answer is yes, it is linking.
  • This material feels rough.
  • Sandy felt the material of her dress..

7
SUBJECT COMPLEMENTS
  • Find the verb. Label action or linking.
  • The main word after the linking verb that answers
    who or what will be a predicate nominative or
    predicate adjective.

8
PREDICATE NOMINATIVE
  • Predicate nominative renames the subject and
    answers who/what after a linking verb.
  • It is a noun or a pronoun.
  • Example. Mrs. Mercer is my English teacher.
    (Teacher is the main word answering what after
    the linking verb).

9
Predicate Adjectives
  • Predicate adjectives still answer what after the
    linking verb.
  • They describe the subject.
  • They are always adjectives.
  • The track star appeared tired after the
    thirty-mile relay. (Tired describes the subject
    and answers what after the linking verb.

10
  • Why isnt salty a predicate adjective in the
    following sentence?
  • The freshly baked dessert was actually a salty
    pie.

11
DIRECT OBJECTS
  • Direct object answers whom or what after an
    action verb.
  • Jeff bought a pencil at the school store.

    (Bought what? Pencil. Pencil is the
    direct object.

12
INDIRECT OBJECTS
  • Indirect objects answer the questions for
    whom/what or to whom/what.
  • They ALWAYS come between the action verb and the
    direct object.
  • They NEVER come after a preposition.
  • You cannot have an indirect object without a
    direct object.

13
  • Jeff gave Mary a headache with all of his
    questions.
    Gave what? Headache. Headache is your
    direct object.
    To whom? Mary. Mary is your indirect object.
    It answers to whom it comes between the action
    verb and the direct object.
  • Jeff gave a headache to Mary. ( No indirect
    object)

14
OBJECTIVE COMPLEMENT
  • An Objective Complement is a noun or adjective
    that comes after the direct object either
    renaming or describing that object.
    A noun
    renames the D.O.
  • An adjective describes the D.O.

15
A TEST TO LOCATE OBJECTIVE COMPLEMENTS
  • If you can substitute the verbs consider or make
    for the verb, it may be an objective complement.
  • If you can add to be before the objective
    complement, it will contain one also.
  • We elected Cynthia president.

16
VERBS THAT USUALLY HAVE AN OBJECTIVE COM.
  • MAKE
  • CONSIDER
  • ELECT
  • APPOINT
  • NAME
  • CHOOSE
  • RENDER
  • THOUGHT

17
EXAMPLES
  • Henry VIII made Catherine of Aragon his queen.
  • Todd considers Marilyn quite intelligent.
  • She thought the day disagreeable.
  • Jealousy made Othello a murderer.

18
RETAINED OBJECTS
  • A noun that remains an object when a verb, having
    both a direct and indirect object in the active
    voice, is put into the passive voice.
  • The one object becomes the subject and the other
    remains the object.
  • Remember in the active voice, the subject acts.
    In the passive, it receives.

19
Examples
  • ACTIVE VOICE
    The band granted him a years leave of absence.
  • PASSIVE VOICE He
    was granted a years leave of absence.
  • Your I.O.became the subject and your D.O. became
    the R.O.

20
  • ACTIVE VOICE
  • The teacher asked the student a difficult
    question.
  • PASSIVE VOICE
  • The student was asked a difficult question.
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