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PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING 4 FEBRUARY 2014

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Title: PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING 4 FEBRUARY 2014


1
PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON
HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING4 FEBRUARY 2014
2
OVERVIEW OF THE COLLEGEWest Coast College
serves the West Coast Region, with a central
office in Malmesbury and 5 campuses in Atlantis,
Citrusdal, Malmesbury Vredenburg and Vredendal.
The college currently employs 354 staff,
including lecturers.
280 km
  • GOVERNANCE AND ADMIISTRATION

116 km
100 km
35 km
3
  • Vision
  • To be a world class Further Education and
    Training institution in the West Coast region
    that promotes lifelong learning and contributes
    to socio-economic development

4
  • Mission
  • To provide FET services of high quality and to be
    the FET provider of first choice by training
    students to
  • Be Employable
  • Have access to Higher Education opportunities
  • Exploit Entrepreneurship opportunities

5
Our Values
  • RESPECT treat people with dignity, the way you
    would like to be treated. Look after property and
    equipment and report all misdemeanours.
  • MOTIVATION self-driven to achieve own and West
    Coast College goals and help others succeed with
    their goals.
  • FAIRNESS consistent treatment of people, yet
    managing firmly, so that no one feels
    discriminated against.
  • HONESTY doing all things above board with no
    hidden agendas or for self-gain.
  • QUALITY DRIVEN pursue all tasks with excellence
    to provide a consistently high standard of
    delivery and constantly look at improvement.

6
GOVERNANCE STRUCTUREThe college had a fully
functioning Council and committees up to 31
December 2013. The main responsibility of Council
is to formulate and give policy directives.
7
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL
  • Each campus has an SRC
  • The campus SRCs elect a college SRC
  • The college SRC is fully functional with an
    allocated budget and participates in
    Council/college structures

8
  • ADMINISTRATION
  • MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE
  • The college has a fully-functional management
    structure. College management is centralised with
    a decentralised campus structure.

9
Chief Executive Officer
Quality Assurance Manager
Internal Auditor
Project Manager
Personal Assistant
Deputy CEO Innovation Development
Deputy CEO Academic
Deputy CEO Administration
Chief Financial Officer
Financial Management
Administration Management
Academic Management
Innovation and Development Management
  • Supply Chain
  • Management
  • Financial Aid
  • Asset Management
  • Human Resources
  • Information
  • Technology
  • Student
  • Administration
  • Residences and
  • Facilities
  • Campus
  • Management
  • Curriculum and
  • Assessment Support
  • Lecturing Staff
  • Marketing
  • Student Support
  • Services
  • Linkages and
  • Partnerships
  • Exit Support and
  • Placement

10
(No Transcript)
11
  • The college is managed and governed by the
    following legislation and policy framework
  • FET Act (2006), PFMA (1999), Skills Development
    Act (1998), NSDSIII (2011 -2016), PPPF Act
    (2000), DHET Supply Chain Management Policy,
    Treasury Regulations and the National Plan for
    Further Education and Training (2008)
  • STATUTE the college is governed by a statute
    standard statute as per FET Act (2006)
  • POLICIES, PROCEDURES The college is also
    governed and administered through its own
    policies, procedures and processes which are not
    inferior to the DHET policy framework

12
  • AUDIT INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL
  • The college conducts an annual External Audit
    through External Auditors and has an Internal
    Audit Unit which conducts audits on an ongoing
    basis
  • RISK MANAGEMENT
  • All risks are recorded, assessed and updated on
    a regular basis in a risk register
  • CONTROLS, MONITORING
  • The college has controls in place and there is
    quarterly monitoring through a performance
    management process and a quality management
    system

13
  • COMMUNICATION
  • Regular communication to internal and external
    stakeholders through meetings, reporting,
    workshops, newsletters and electronic media
  • ACCOUNTABILITY
  • Annual financial reporting
  • ME quarterly reporting
  • Reports to DHET, Council, funders and external
    stakeholders

14
STUDENT INFORMATION
15
Credibility of Examinations
  • Examinations for NCV and for Report 191 Business
    Studies and Engineering Studies are conducted in
    accordance with The National Policy Document,
    Government Gazette Vol. 507, No 30287 of 12
    September 2007, circulars and memos issued by the
    DHET.

16
Credibility of Examinations
  • Campuses are briefed on what they must have in
    place prior and during examinations, e.g.
    management plans, security plans as indicated
    below
  • A. Management Plan
  • - Time table with invigilators and relief
    invigilators
  • - Duty list with responsibilities
  • - Examination Committee (Monitoring of the
    examination process)
  • - Campus Irregularity Committee (Headed by CM)
  • B. Security Plan
  • - Storage of question papers in a safe
  • - Storage of blank answer books and examination
    material
  • - Control of access to examination venue and
    strong room
  • - Emergency action plan

17
Credibility of Examinations
  • Prior to commencement of examinations there is
    monitoring and inspections are held at all
    campuses to ensure that all safes are ready,
    question papers received, adequate stationary is
    on hand, venues are conducive etc.
  • To ensure that the credibility and integrity of
    the examinations are not compromised in any way,
    the college also embarks on a series of workshops
    for training of all staff involved per campus.
  • These workshops are inclusive of all support
    staff directly involved with the examinations
    process as well as all lecturing staff to ensure
    that they are fully informed and prepared for any
    eventuality that may occur during the examination
    process.

18
Credibility of Examinations
  • Separate training sessions are also held for all
    nominated invigilators, and ONLY upon
    successfully undergoing the training are they
    issued with a invigilator contract for the
    specific examination. This includes a
    comprehensive training session on the rules and
    regulations before, during and after the
    examination, inclusive of any irregularities, if
    any.
  • The role of all functionaries are also explained
    in depth as well as the implementation and
    application of all rules for functionaries and
    students.

19
Credibility of Examinations
  • EXAMINATION MONITORING
  • Examination monitoring takes place for the
    duration of the examination, with particular
    reference and full compliance to the following
  • Documentation
  • Security venue and safe/storage area
  • Admission permits/IDs, name tags
  • Storage of question papers and control of scripts
    and examination materials
  • Irregularities
  • Invigilation

20
Student Enrolment
  • Steady growth over last 3 years in line with
    DHET vision. (all programmes)
  • Limitation of DHET Bursary funds and change in
    guidelines resulted in reduced intake
    particularly for NC(V).

21
Student Enrolment as at 31 Jan
22
Student Enrolment as at 31 Jan
23
Student Enrolment as at 31 Jan
24
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25
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26
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27
Student Placement as at 31 Jan
71
57
69
28
Student Housing
  • Atlantis (Leased)
  • Grassmere Residence catering for 60 females
  • Honeyvale Residence catering for 44 males
  • Robinvale Residence catering for 60 females
  • Citrusdal (Own building)
  • Navel catering for 96 males
  • Satsuma, Karra Karra Valencia for 128 females
  • VGK catering Huis Brandwag (Rented) 90 males
  • Malmesbury (Leased)
  • Salem Residence catering for 18 males
  • Eden Residence catering for 30 females
  • Vredenburg (Leased)
  • Chemfos Residence catering for 80 males
  • Villette Street Residence catering for 20 females
  • NEW 120 males and 120 females (April 2014)
  • Vredendal (Own building)
  • House Barnard Residence catering for 240 females
  • House Liberty Residence catering fro 136 males

29
Student Housing
  • Total availability 538 females and 464 males
    total of 1 002 students collectively
  • Standard rate of R16 000 per annum as from 2014.
    (Maximum of R17 758 can be claimed from DHET
    Bursary Scheme)
  • Challenges
  • Oversubscription for residence facilities due to
    rural locality and mobility of students from
    urban areas.
  • Bursary shortage students living with colleges
    nearby, move to colleges far from home.
  • Limited private residence facilities available in
    community WCC serves.
  • Students lie about their addresses and when
    residence is full they say they stay in the area.
  • In most cases the condition they live in at
    private accommodation is not conducive. The
    college only assists if we become aware of and
    insists on alternative accommodation. The
    college enters into an agreement with the
    landlord and pays the landlord directly on behalf
    of the student.

30
Student Transport
  • Actual costs per route applied for.
  • Total support during 2013 1 429 students
    collectively.
  • Transport is sourced through public tenders and
    providers are paid directly.
  • No money is paid to a student.
  • Challenges
  • The high number of students requiring assistance
    .
  • No public transport in our area.
  • Distances between communities and catchment areas
    of campus.

31
ACADEMIC
32
EXAMINATION RESULTS NC(V) 2013
33
NC(V) LEVEL 2 NOVEMBER 2013
PROGRAMME WROTE PASSED PASSED TARGET 2013
OFFICE ADMINSTRATION 442 278 62.90 68
MANAGEMENT 82 52 63.41 65
EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT 111 73 65.77 70
ENGINEERING RELATED DESIGN 229 118 51.53 52
ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CONST 218 108 49.54 50
HOSPITALITY STUDIES 63 28 44.44 75
PRIMARY HEALTH 113 93 82.30 60
TOTAL 1258 750 59.62 56
34
LEVEL 2 RESULTS
  • Even though overall target has been achieved, the
    following subjects have been identified for High
    Intervention per programme
  • Office Administration
  • New Venture Creation
  • Management
  • Management Practice
  • Education and Development
  • Early Childhood Development
  • Engineering Related Design
  • Automotive Fitting and Turning and Mathematics
  • Electrical infrastructure Construction
  • Electrical Principles Practice Electrical
    Control Digital Electronics and Mathematics
  • Hospitality
  • Food Preparation and Hospitality Generics

35
NC(V) LEVEL 3 NOVEMBER 2013
PROGRAMME WROTE PASSED PASS Target 2013
OFFICE ADMINSTRATION 339 192 56.64 45
GENERIC MANAGEMENT 64 43 67.19 52
EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT 26 22 84.62 79
ENGINEERING RELATED DESIGN 120 45 37.50 65
ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CONST 116 35 30.17 72
HOSPITALITY STUDIES 37 17 45.95 79
TOTAL 702 354 50.43 52
36
LEVEL 3 RESULTS
  • Target not achieved, the following subjects have
    been identified for High Intervention per
    programme
  • Office Administration
  • Business Practice New Venture Creation
  • Management
  • Project Management
  • Engineering Related Design
  • Automotive Material Technology and Mathematics
  • Electrical infrastructure Construction
  • Electrical Principles Practice Electrical
    Control Digital Electronics and Mathematics
  • Hospitality
  • Client Services

37
NC(V) LEVEL 4 NOVEMBER 2013
PROGRAMME WROTE PASSED PASS Target 2013
OFFICE ADMINSTRATION 240 167 69.58 59
GENERIC MANAGEMENT 66 27 40.91 75
EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT 99 69 69.70 68
ENGINEERING RELATED DESIGN 113 51 45.13 50
ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE CONST 108 22 20.37 67
HOSPITALITY STUDIES 19 8 42.11 61
TOTAL 645 344 53.33 57
38
LEVEL 4 RESULTS
  • Target not achieved, the following subjects have
    been identified for High Intervention per
    programme
  • Management
  • Management Practice Operations Financial
    Management
  • Engineering Related Design
  • Automotive Fabrication and Mathematics
  • Electrical Infrastructure Construction
  • Electrical Principles Practice Electrical
    Control Digital Electronics and Mathematics
  • Hospitality
  • Hospitality Services and Hospitality Generics

39
RESULTS BUSINESS STUDIES 2013
40
REPORT 191 BUSINESS STUDIES NOVEMBER 2013
N4 PROGRAMME WROTE PASSED PASS Target 2013
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 74 33 44.59 38

MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE 34 21 61.76 38

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 35 14 40 38

TOTAL 143 68 47.55 38
41
REPORT 191 BUSINESS STUDIES NOVEMBER 2013
N5 PROGRAMME WROTE PASSED PASS Target 2013
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 70 35 44.30 38

MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE 131 29 22.14 38

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 42 26 66.67 38

TOTAL 252 92 36.41 38
42
SUMMARY N5 RESULTS
  • Management Assistance Target not achieved
    information processing a challenge

43
REPORT 191 BUSINESS STUDIES NOVEMBER 2013
N6 PROGRAMME WROTE PASSED PASS TARGET 2013
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 14 6 42.5 38

MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE 13 0 0 38

TOTAL 27 6 22.22 38
44
SUMMARY N6 RESULTS
  • Management Assistance Target not achieved
  • Information Processing a challenging subject at
    some campuses

45
RESULTS ENGINEERING STUDIES 2013
46
REPORT 191 BUSINESS STUDIES NOVEMBER 2013
N1- SUBJECT PASSES WROTE PASS
Mathematics 118 60.17
Engineering Science 93 65.59
Electrical Trade Theory 51 70.59
Industrial Electronics 46 65.22
Fitting Machining 22 63.64
Metalwork Theory 32 81.25
Engineering Drawing 63 69.84
Overall Subject Totals 425 66.35
47
REPORT 191 BUSINESS STUDIES NOVEMBER 2013
N2- SUBJECT PASSES Wrote PASS
Mathematics 96 57.29
Engineering Science 99 62.63
Electrical Trade Theory 46 39.3
Building Science 22 62.5
Fitting Machining 30 40
Engineering Drawing 22 59.1
Building Drawing 8 12.5
Carpentry Roofing 5 100

Overall subject enrolment 328 54
48
REPORT 191 BUSINESS STUDIES NOVEMBER 2013
N3- SUBJECT PASSES WROTE PASS
Mathematics 27 11.11

Engineering Science 30 23.33

Mechanical Technology 6 83.33

Engineering Drawing 2 100

Overall Subject Pass 65 26.15
49
STRATEGY FOR ACADEMIC IMPROVEMENT
  • Lectures across campuses will be used for support
    in challenging subjects
  • Team teaching within the same campus across
    levels will be used
  • Lecturers present their results during Executive
    road show with improvement strategies
  • Take 2013 results into consideration when
    lecturers are allocated for 2014
  • Peer tutoring programme
  • Tutors in Engineering, Electrical and Mathematics
  • Evening classes for students in residence
  • Establishment of study groups

50
STRATEGY FOR ACADEMIC IMPROVEMENT
  • Extra classes and weekend classes
  • Using experts from outside the college in
    subjects like Mathematics
  • Use ex-students in assisting with practical work
  • Monitoring the submission of tools for ICASS
  • Monitor student performance throughout the year

51
STRATEGY FOR ACADEMIC IMPROVEMENT
  • Workshop for lecturers in challenging topics
  • Use ETDP SETA funding for training of all Maths
    and Maths Lit lecturers
  • Support class visits for new and struggling
    lecturers to identify needs for further support
  • Use of Curriculum Planners for support in the
    subjects identified
  • Setting a target per term for each subject
    identified

52
STRATEGY FOR ACADEMIC IMPROVEMENT
  • At the end of each term a list of top 20 students
    per program is compiled and announced at all
    campuses
  • List of top 20 students per level is compiled
  • The aim is to motivate students and to support
    not only those that are not doing well, but to
    encourage top students to do even better
  • From these lists the merit list of the college
    per program and per level will be compiled and
    loaded on the college website

53
RETENTION AND DROP-OUT RATE 2013
54
RETENTION RATE NOVEMBER 2013 LEVEL 2
CAMPUS ENROLLED WROTE RETENTION
ATLANTIS 621 380 61.2

CITRUSDAL 253 177 70

MALMESBURY 202 167 82.7

VREDENBURG 420 321 76.2

VREDENDAL 377 290 76.9

WEST COAST COLLEGE LEVEL 2 1877 1335 71.12
55
RETENTION RATE NOVEMBER 2013 LEVEL 3
CAMPUS ENROLLED WROTE RETENTION
ATLANTIS 293 239 81.6

CITRUSDAL 125 108 86.4

MALMESBURY 115 109 94.8

VREDENBURG 180 154 85.56

VREDENDAL 133 113 85

WEST COAST LEVEL 3 846 723 85.5
56
RETENTION RATE NOVEMBER 2013 LEVEL 4
CAMPUS ENROLLED WROTE RETENTION
ATLANTIS 219 196 89.5

CITRUSDAL 124 115 92.7

MALMESBURY 111 104 93.7

VREDENBURG 108 98 90.7

VREDENDAL 135 131 97

WEST COAST LEVEL 4 697 644 92.4
OVERALL L2-L4 3416 2702 79.1
57
RETENTION RATE BUSINESS STUDIES N4-N6
LEVEL ENROLLED WROTE RETENTION Target 2013
N4 308 159 51.62 60

N5 349 259 74.21 60

N6 29 20 68.97 60

OVERALL 686 438 63.84 60

58
INFRASTRUCTURE PLANS
59
Construction projects completed in 2013The
following construction projects were completed in
order to improve college facilities.
Campus Project details Total construction cost
Citrusdal New residence, kitchen and dining hall and two additional classrooms R11 016 099
Vredenburg 5 additional classrooms R3 118 125
Vredendal New residence R13 090 294
Malmesbury 8 new classrooms R5 656 626
Total construction cost R32 881 144
Funded as follows
WCED Earmarked capital funding R7 600 000
WCC operational funds R25 281 144
60
Collage of completed projects
61
Construction projects to be completed in
2014The following construction projects are
currently in progress and will further expand
college facilities.
Campus Project details Total construction cost
Citrusdal New electrical workshop R3 450 000
Malmesbury 8 new classrooms R12 833 213
Vredendal New male residence and additional female residence R11 546 867
Atlantis 10 additional classrooms R7 384 949
Vredenburg New residence, dining hall and 6 additional classrooms R20 472 120
Malmesbury New administrative building R21 515 567
Total construction cost R77 202 716
Funded as follows
WCED Earmarked capital funding 0
WCC operational funds R77 202 716
62
Collage of current construction sites
63
DHET BURSARY ADMINISTRATION
64
Policy Context
  • DHET FET College Bursary Scheme guidelines,
    conditions and criteria developed in line with
    the National Norms and Standards for TVET
    Colleges
  • Each student enrolled in a ministerially-approved
    (i.e. state-funded) programme must be subsidised
    by the State by 80 of the total programme costs
  • The 20 difference of the total programme costs
    must be recovered from the student (college fees)
  • The Bursary Rules and Guidelines issued
    recommends that at least 80 be allocated to
    college fees and 20 to cover accommodation and
    travel allowances
  • The amounts allocated to each college annually
    will be allocated between NC(V) and Nated
    programs

65
Role and Responsibilities
  • College
  • Student Support Services and Bursary Officers
    made available at each Campus
  • Administering student applications at point of
    registration Means Test
  • Bursary Committee at campus level Process
    applications and make recommendations to
    Financial Aid Committee of college
  • Financial Aid Committee of college Approval
    and rejection of applications
  • Appeals Committee at college - Assist student
    appeals and final recommendation
  • Advising students (in writing) of the outcome of
    their applications
  • Submission of approved application documentation
    to NSFAS
  • Submission of annual NSFAS graduate/drop-out
    statistics reports

66
Role and Responsibilities
  • Students
  • Submit bursary applications at point of
    registration
  • Complete Means Test
  • Submit correct and credible information as well
    as all required supporting documents
  • Attend college regularly and actively
    participate in all teaching and learning
    programmes (80 attendancy rule)
  • Perform academically

67
Bursaries and funding available to students Due
to the rural locality of the college 95 of our
total student population qualifies for bursaries
in accordance with the Means Test. NSFAS
allocation 2014 2013
2012 NC(V) R31 153 097 R28 602
045 R29 474 579 Nated R 4 830 348
R 5 143 509 R 3 149 983

R15m R10 570
485 (other funds) (DHET
funds)

R48 745 554 R43 195 047
68
  • Bursary Rules and Guidelines
  • Bursaries available to students from the NSFAS
    allocation are allocated based on specific rules
  • TUITION Academic rules/Means Test. Current and
    new students. New students started at 50 pass
    rate requirement. Was relaxed after consultation.
  • ACCOMMODATION 40km rule. No accommodation
    inside the distance. The college does not have
    sufficient residences to accommodate all students
    and transport plans activated at extra costs.
    Lack of funding to build and contract for
    accommodation in rural areas.
  • TRANSPORT 10km rule. No transport allowance
    inside the distance. No formalised transport
    systems in rural areas.
  • ATTENDANCE We welcome the 80 monthly
    attendance required as it will improve our
    retention rate.

69
  • Concerns regarding bursary allocations
  • Rules and guidelines not consulted with college
    prior to issue
  • Rules and guidelines only issued late 2013 after
    closing of college
  • College could not brief students on time
  • Allocations should make provision for rural
    colleges
  • Bursaries are not allocated according to college
    and student needs

70
  • Administrative challenges regarding bursaries
  • Differentiated bursaries and systems required
  • Ownership of the bursary administration process
    at campus level
  • Monthly monitoring of student attendance
  • Students want to receive change from the
    bursary allocation
  • Transport and accommodation more than 20 of
    total funds due to rural locality
  • 84 of bursary recipients require transport and
    accommodation
  • Non-submission

71
  • System requirements for colleges
  • College does not have same system as NSFAS.
  • Concerns
  • Means Test value reporting and control totals on
    allocations
  • Third Party involvement who do not understand the
    bursary process at the college
  • Delays in disbursement of allocated funds and
    payment of claims
  • No sufficient direct communication between
    college and NSFAS on systems
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