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WHO template and recommendations

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Second Arab Water Week New Prospects and Challenges for the Water Sector in the Arab Region 27-31 January 2013 Amman-Jordan WSP Framework Overview in the ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: WHO template and recommendations


1
Second Arab Water Week New Prospects and
Challenges for the Water Sector in the Arab
Region 27-31 January 2013 Amman-Jordan
WSP Framework Overview in the Context of the MDG
Outcomes
Susan Kilani WHO/CEHA
2
Climate Change, Water Scarcity and Linkages to
the MDGs
Cities run dry insufficient water for hygiene
and health protection
Water scarcity
MDG 4
MDG 7
MDG 4
Compromised water quality
MDG 7
MDG 1,4,5
Wastewater used for food production
Reduced food production
MDG 1,7
MDG 1
Food insecurity
MDG 1
3
The Joint Programme
  • Four UN agencies have developed a Joint Programme
    to support the United Nations Country Teams
    (UNCT) efforts to achieve the UNDAF outcome of
    healthy and sustainable environment.
  • The ultimate goal of the Programme is to protect
    human health against water scarcity induced by
    climate change.

4
Joint Programme Outcomes
Outcome 1 Sustained access to improved water
supply sources despite increased water scarcity
induced by climate change
Outcome 2 Strengthened adaptive capacity for
health protection and food security to climate
change under water scarcity conditions.
5
Join Program Outputs of Outcome 1
  • Output 1.1 National Drinking Water Quality
    Management System at Central and Periphery level
    is Strengthened.
  • Output 1.2 Sustainable and Reliable Supply of
    Minimum Water Requirements for Health Protection
    is Provided to All Citizens.

6
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7
Output 1.1National Drinking Water Quality
Management System at Central and Periphery Level
is Strengthened
  • Upgrade the national drinking water quality
    management system (DWQMS) for comprehensive
    national coverage.
  • Design and implement training programme on DWQMS
    for all levels.
  • Develop and implement (5) demonstration water
    safety plans (3 urban 2 rural).
  • Strengthen the surveillance role of the MoH
    within the water quality preventative management
    framework

8
WHO Guidelines on Drinking Water Quality
  • Since 1958
  • 4th edition published in 2011
  • Strict focus on public health protection
  • Based on best available evidence in science and
    practice
  • Advisory in nature
  • International scientific point of reference
  • Need for adaptation to national priorities
  • Incremental improvement

9
Evolution of Approaches
  • Need for holistic and proactive approach
  • Move away from over-reliance on end-product
    testing
  • More emphasis on prevention
  • More focus on input monitoring
  • More focus on process control
  • WHO Framework for Safe Drinking Water

10
Framework for Safe Drinking Water
Health-based targets(National regulatory body)
Water Safety Plan(Water utility)
Independent surveillance(Surveillance agency)
11
Health-Based Targets
  • Targets based on public health protection and
    disease prevention
  • Quantitative benchmark for water suppliers
  • Different types for different situations and
    purposes
  • Water quality
  • Specified technology
  • Specified performance
  • Health outcome

Health-based targets(National regulatory body)
Water Safety Plan(Water utility)
Independent surveillance(Surveillance agency)
12
Water Safety Plans (WSP)
  • The most effective means of consistently
    ensuring the safety of a drinking-water supply is
    through the use of a comprehensive risk
    assessment and risk management approach that
    encompasses all steps in water supply from
    catchment to consumer. In these Guidelines, such
    approaches are called water safety plans.

Health-based targets(National regulatory body)
Water Safety Plan(Water utility)
Independent surveillance(Surveillance agency)
13
Independent Surveillance
  • Systematic surveillance to verify the WSP is
    operating properly
  • Audit of WSP
  • Final check of end product quality

Health-based targets(National regulatory body)
Water Safety Plan(Water utility)
Independent surveillance(Surveillance agency)
14
WSP is a Piece of Thinking!
What are the risks to my supply system?
How important are they?
Continuous cycle
How do I fix them?
How do I know thatthe they are fixed?
15
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16
Supporting Tools Emerging
17
System description
Improvement and upgrade
System assessment
Identify additional or improved control measures
and proceduresHow to improve reliability and
robustness?
Identify hazards and hazardous eventsWhat can go
wrong?
Determine and validate existing control
measuresAre controls suitable and effective?
Establish step-wiseimprovement and upgrade
planWhat actions and investments are needed?
Assess and prioritise risks to public healthHow
important are they?
System management
Define operational monitoring and inspection
plansHow to identify if something goes wrong?
PLANNED TRIGGEREDWSP REVIEW
Establish actions and management proceduresHow
to respond if something goes wrong?
Verification
Establish procedures for auditingIs water safety
planning adequate?
Define compliance monitoring procedures Are
water quality targets met?
18
Water Safety Plan Steps
Map the supply system
Identify hazards assess risks
Review WSP
WSP cycle
Review adequacy of preventive control measures
Prioritize implementimprovements
19
Semi-Quantitative Risk Matrices
  • Each identified hazardous event will receive a
    value
  • Comparison, ranking and prioritisation of risks
  • Events can be classified as significant
    andnon-significant for management
  • Note
  • Basis for a relative assessment of risks within
    one water supply
  • No comparisons amongst different water supplies

20
Severity
  • Severity of consequences
  • Consequences for public health?
  • Consequences for consumer satisfaction?
  • Consequences for image of supplier?
  • Financial economic consequences?
  • Need for combined analysis as basis for
    meaningful business decisions

POSSIBLEASSESSMENTSCALES
21
Risk Factor Matrix
22
Dangers of Over-reliance on End-product Testing
  • Classical faecal indicators have different
    sensitivity to disinfection and environmental
    conditions of viral or protozoan pathogens
  • Outbreaks reported in absence of faecal
    indicators
  • Limited early warning capability of microbial
    testingwater is distributed and drunk after
    test results are gained
  • Water volumes tested are rarely statistically
    representative
  • Limited capability to detect short term
    fluctuations

Confidence gap TOO LITTLE TOO LATE
23
1. Upgrade the national drinking water quality
management system (DWQMS) for comprehensive
national coverage
  • DWQMS and pertinent legislations assessment was
    completed through close consultation with the
    national stakeholders adhering to the Water
    Safety Plan (WSP) approach as recommended by the
    WHO.
  • Now the Drinking water operator and regulator
    recognize the importance WSP approach not only in
    the water quality compliance with the national
    standards but also to minimize water quality
    related incidents.
  • WSP establishes a collective sense of shared
    responsibility and involvement of all staff and
    is recognized as a way of day to day work and not
    an extra burden

24
2. Design and implement training programme on
DWQMS for all levels
  • A thorough training need assessment is completed
    for all levels dealing with the supply of safe
    drinking water in WAJ and MoH.
  • A package of training material was developed to
    be the base for a national TOT programme
    nationwide.
  • The design of the training activity synchronized
    along the process of WSP development proved to be
    effective and enhanced the capacity development
    and the utilization of collective knowledge of
    the concerned national counterparts.

25
3. Develop and implement (5) demonstration water
safety plans (3 urban 2 rural)
  • The Ministry of Water Irrigation/ Water
    Authority of Jordan (WAJ) determined 5
    demonstration sites operated by utilities and
    companies. The five utilities and companies
    collectively provide water supply services to
    5.13 million (84) of the Jordanian population.
  • A national steering committee was formed from the
    top management of WAJ and MOH to steer and
    support the project process and monitor progress.

26
Wadi Al Arab drinking water supply system 2011
Zai drinking water supply system 2011
Al Karamah Dam drinking water supply system 2011
Al lajoon drinking water supply system 2011
The Aqaba drinking water supply system 2011
27
Capacity Building for the Core Team in the WSP
Demonstration Sites
  • A core team of 50 was appointed of technical
    staff from the water suppliers and environmental
    health to develop the water safety plans in the
    demonstration sites.
  • Capacity building of the core team was completed.
    The core team members will be the trainers and
    knowledge radiators for the other staff concerned
    with water quality management in Jordan in the
    future envisaged scaling up.
  • WSP process in the 5 demonstration sites is
    completed and all deliverables submitted.
  • There are concrete steps taken in 3 out of 5
    utilities that will ensure implementation,
    scaling up and institutionalisation. These
    utilities provide safe drinking water to 60 of
    Jordanian population.

28
Capacity Building from the Core Team to all Staff
Dealing with Safe Water Supply
Top Management Steering committee
Middle Management Assistant SG
Operational Management Team leaders
Technical WSP Teams/ WSP Implementation from 50
people in 6 utilities TO all the staff in the 12
governorates and water Utilities
29
4. Strengthen the Surveillance Role of the MoH
within the WSP Framework
  • Water Quality Surveillance Concept note is
    developed in close consultation with a national
    team of water quality experts appointed from GoJ
    to provide a guide to the health authorities.
  • The training of the environmental health staff in
    the kingdom is underway.
  • Critical laboratory equipment have been procured
    and installed in MOH water testing labs to secure
    adequate readiness in the for the surveillance
    function within the new water quality management
    system.

30
WSP Scaling up Requirements
31
Scale-up implementation and audit of WSP
Regulatory framework developed and implemented
Organise multi stakeholder involvement and
consultation process Consolidation of national
vision and establishment of detailed strategy
Evaluate WSP pilots Assessment of feasibility,
added value and lessons learnt
Initiate pilot projects Practical experience built
Establish national steering group Country
commitment to pursue WSP approach and initial
vision
Initial WSP sensitisation
32
Phases of Adoption of the WSP Approach by GoJ
  • Phase 1 Voluntary adoption strategy through
    on-going WSP promotion and advocacy initiatives
    spearheaded by the MoH, WAJ and particularly the
    champions from the demonstration projects. The
    goal of this phase is to sensitize all relevant
    stakeholders on the WSP methodology, the outcomes
    of the demonstration projects as well as the
    added value and expected achievements of the WSP
    approach.
  • Phase 2 Establishment of regulatory
    requirements. Since a voluntary implementation
    strategy may not be picked-up by all water
    suppliers throughout Jordan, phase 1 should end
    in a regulatory push which makes WSP a legally
    binding requirement.

33
Institutionalization and Scaling Up in Jordan
  • National counterparts developed a WSP Policy
    Statement and approved the road map for
    scale-up and sustainability with main goals to
  • Adopt the preventative drinking water quality
    management system that relies on risk
    identification, assessment and management along
    the water supply chain in close collaboration
    with the concerned stake holders.
  • Incrementally scale up in the adoption of WSP
    framework in accordance with the national
    priorities until all the water supply systems in
    the country are managed in accordance to the WSP
    approach (vision).

34
Thank you
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