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Building on Success: Developing a Model for System-Wide Implementation of PBIS

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... Coach/SWIS Facilitator 32 PBIS Schools and 24 Coaches participate ... High School Elementary ... the School (continued) Baltimore County Schools ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Building on Success: Developing a Model for System-Wide Implementation of PBIS


1
Building on SuccessDeveloping a Model for
System-Wide Implementation of PBIS
  • Joan Ledvina Parr
  • Linda Marchineck
  • Margaret Grady Kidder
  • Baltimore County Public Schools

2
Baltimore County Public Schools
  • 25th largest school system in the nation
  • 108,015 students
  • 162 schools
  • 103 Elementary
  • FARMS 35.9, Mobility 11.3, LEP 3.3,
  • 27 Middle
  • FARMS 33.1, Mobility, 14.3 LEP 1.1
  • 26 High
  • FARMS 19.6, Mobility, 15.2 LEP 1.1
  • 6 Other
  • 17,000 Employees including 8,200 teachers

3
PBIS in Baltimore County
  • Coordinated through the Department of
  • Student Support Services
  • Mr. Dale Rauenzahn, Executive Director
  • Mrs. Patsy Holmes, Director
  • Dr. Margaret Grady Kidder, Coordinator
  • Dr. Joan Ledvina Parr, Coach Facilitator/SWIS
    Facilitator
  • Ms. Linda Marchineck, IST/PBIS Coach/SWIS
    Facilitator
  • Ms. Susie Swindell, Coach/SWIS Facilitator
  • 32 PBIS Schools and 24 Coaches participate

4
Maryland PBIS Partnership and Collaboration
5
History of PBIS in Maryland and BCPS Schools
Trained in PBIS
  • 1998 Collaboration MSDE and Sheppard Pratt
    Health System
  • 99 Tough Kids Tough Times Forum
  • 15 Schools Trained Statewide
  • 1 BCPS ES Trained
  • Maryland Summer Institute 2000
  • 1 BCPS ES Trained
  • Maryland Summer Institute 2001
  • 2 ES and 2 MS Trained
  • Project Target and Johns Hopkins University join
    the collaboration with MSDE and SEPH, 2002
  • Maryland Summer Institute 2002
  • 7 ES and 4 MS Trained
  • Maryland Summer Institute 2003
  • 3 ES, 2 MS, 4 HS Trained
  • Maryland Summer Institute 2004
  • 4 MS and 2 HS Trained

6
Positive Behavioral Support in Baltimore County
  • Universal Interventions
  • All schools are encouraged to use the BCPS
    Positive Behavior Planning Guide
  • BCPS Schools
  • Total Schools
  • 103 Elementary
  • 27 Middle Schools
  • 26 High Schools
  • 6 Other Schools
  • Targeted Interventions
  • Selected schools are invited to participate in
    PBIS Training
  • Schools selected by suspension rates
  • Schools self-select based on their School
    Improvement Plan
  • PBIS Schools
  • 14 Elementary
  • 12 Middle Schools
  • 6 High Schools

7

Baltimore County 2004-2005 162 Schools 32
Schools are PBIS Schools

Secondary Prevention Targeted Interventions
include training schools in PBIS
20
Primary Prevention Universal Interventions for
all schools include using the Positive Behavior
Planning Guide
80 of Schools
8
Basic Concepts of PBIS
  • School Teams are Trained at the
  • Summer Institute sponsored by
  • Maryland State Department of Education, Sheppard
    Pratt Health System,
  • and the Johns Hopkins University
  • The following training materials are adapted from
    the PBIS model as developed by
  • George Sugai and Rob Horner, University of Oregon

9
Process for Supporting Behavior and Achievement
OUTCOMES
Supporting Staff Behavior
Supporting Decision Making
DATA
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Supporting Student Behavior
10
Key Elements of PBIS
  • School-wide behavior planning is based on a
    balance of four key elements
  • Clearly specified OUTCOMES that are related to
    behavior and student achievement
  • SYSTEMS that support staff buy-in and sustained
    use of effective practices
  • DATA gathered by the school to make decisions
    about improving behavior and learning
  • Evidence-based PRACTICES and interventions that
    are effective for staff and students

11
Positive Behavior Support
Supporting Decision Making
Supporting Staff Behavior
DATA office discipline referrals PBIS self
assessment survey all staff (parents/students?)
input academic progress attendance
direct observation school improvement goal
progress
SYSTEMS School wide Non classroom
Classroom Individual students
PRACTICES define (behav. expect. routines)
teach acknowledge correct follow up
feedback consensus collaboration
Supporting Student Behavior
12
Designing School-Wide Systemsfor Student Success
1-5
1-5
5-10
5-10
80-90
80-90
13
Academic and Behavioral Interventions
  • Consistent implementation of Voluntary State
    Curriculum
  • On-going curriculum-based assessments
  • Differentiated instruction
  • Intensive special education interventions and
    services
  • School-wide positive discipline
  • Effective classroom organization and behavior
    management
  • Targeted interventions for groups of students
  • Individualized interventions for specific
    students like FBA/BIPs

14
PBIS School-wide InterventionsOverview
  1. Establish commitment and maintain team
  2. Establish school-wide expectations
  3. Establish an on-going system of rewards
  4. Establish a system for responding to behavioral
    violations
  5. Establish a data system to monitor progress and
    aid in decision making
  6. Arrange for consistent implementation and utilize
    district level support

15
1. Establish commitment and maintain team
  • Establish PBIS Leadership Team
  • Strong, administrative support
  • School-wide representation on PBIS Team
  • Secure school-wide agreements and supports
  • Strive for full (gt80) faculty participation
  • Prioritize resources (time, materials, cost)
  • Plan on a 3 5 year commitment
  • Establish a data-based action plan
  • Use the PBIS Staff Survey results
  • Use behavioral incident data (office referrals,
    etc.)

16
2. Establish school-wide expectations
  • Develop rules of behavior
  • 3 to 5 positively stated rules
  • Easy to remember
  • Apply to all students, settings, and staff
  • Develop a matrix of expected behavior in target
    contexts
  • Contexts include classrooms, hallways, gym,
    cafeteria, common areas, bus loading zone, etc.
  • Teach the expected behaviors using an
    instructional approach
  • Directly teach (tell/explain, model/show,
    practice, give reminders and pre-corrections)
  • Actively supervise
  • Positively reinforce

17
Develop Rules of Behavior
  • The 5 Bes
  • Be kind
  • Be safe
  • Be cooperative
  • Be respectful
  • Be peaceful
  • Code of Conduct
  • I am respectful
  • I am responsible
  • I am safe
  • I am prepared
  • Respect Responsibility Pride
  • Show respect
  • Show responsibility
  • High 5s
  • Be respectful
  • Be responsible
  • Be there, be ready
  • Follow directions
  • Hands/feet to self
  • The Respect School
  • Respect others
  • Respect property
  • Respect yourself
  • Formula 4 Success
  • Respect
  • Responsibility
  • Ready-to-learn
  • Re-thinking

18
Develop Rules of Behavior
  • RAMS Rules
  • R esponsibility and
  • Respect
  • A cademic Achievement
  • M otivation
  • S uccess
  • Tenets of Kenwood Pride
  • B e there and prepared
  • L ive responsibly
  • U phold integrity
  • E arn and give respect
  • Viking Code of Conduct
  • Be respectful
  • Be responsible
  • Be ready
  • Eagle PRIDE
  • P reparation
  • R esponsibility
  • I ntegrity
  • D iligence
  • E arn Respect

19
Matrix of Expected Behavior
20
3. Establish an on-going system of rewards
  • Acknowledge expected behavior
  • Use tangible rewards and acknowledgements
  • High 5s, coupons, gotchas, etc.
  • Use social recognition
  • Assemblies, bulletin boards, names over the
    intercom
  • Use guidelines
  • Fade tangibles
  • Schedule strategically
  • Maintain 51 positive to correction ratio

21
4. Establish a system for responding to
behavioral violations
  • Develop an agreement about which behaviors are
    handled in the classroom and which are office
    managed
  • Use verbal redirection, teacher consequence,
    and/or office referral
  • Use pre-correction and restatement of expected
    behaviors

22
5. Establish a data system to monitor progress
and aid in decision making
  • Utilize a data management system, e.g., SWIS
  • Develop procedures for ongoing monitoring and
    evaluation
  • Meet regularly to review data and implement
    interventions

23
6. Arrange for consistent implementation and
utilize district level support
  • Develop targeted interventions for groups of
    at-risk students
  • Build capacity for function-based support in
    order to develop individualized plans for
    specific students (FBA/BIPs)
  • Connect PBIS Team with School Improvement Team
    and Student Support Team
  • Utilize district level support and other
    leadership resources

24
How Baltimore County Supports its PBIS Schools
  • Levels of PBIS Support include
  • School-based team
  • Strong, administrative leadership is encouraged
  • School-wide representation on PBIS team
  • PBIS Coach assigned to school team
  • Provides expertise on the PBIS process, behavior
    analysis, and data interpretation
  • MSDE/BCPS Leadership Teams
  • Provides consultation and support

25
Phases in the BCPS Model of PBIS Training as a
Support to the Summer Institute Training
  • Phase 1Administrator Commitment
  • Spring Forum arranged and Coach Facilitator
    consults
  • Phase 2Training the PBIS School Team
  • Coach assigned to each school
  • Phase 3Implementing PBIS within the School
  • Coach, Coach Facilitator, and BCPS Leadership
    Team assists

26
Phase 1Administrator Commitment
  • Administrators of identified schools attend a
    Spring Forum to learn about PBIS
  • Follow-up meeting with the Coach Facilitator to
    share information such as
  • School rules
  • Matrix of expected behaviors
  • Classroom managed vs. office managed behaviors
  • Flowchart of the disciplinary process
  • Gotcha and recognition tickets

27
Phase 1Administrator Commitment(continued)
  • School completes a Staff Survey to document areas
    of concern
  • The new school is encouraged to send faculty
    members to visit exemplar PBIS schools within
    Baltimore County

28
Phase 2Training the PBIS School Team
  • PBIS school team members attend the Summer
    Institute hosted by MSDE-SPHS-JHU
  • School teams begin to plan their implementation
    of PBIS
  • They attend a poster session of exemplar schools
    and dialogue with those schools representatives
  • BCPS Coach Facilitator follows up with new school
    teams throughout the summer to provide guidance

29
Phase 2Training the PBIS School Team(Continued)
  • School teams develop their products and plan for
    teacher training the first week of school
  • Each school is assigned a coach who works with
    that school during the planning as well as
    implementation phases
  • Schools are encouraged to review and adapt the
    work of experienced PBIS schools
  • Lesson plans
  • Teacher training models
  • Incentive programs for students and staff
  • Acknowledgement assemblies
  • Motivational strategies for students and staff

30
Phase 3Implementing PBIS within the School
  • PBIS team trains faculty about PBIS concepts
  • Works best with multiple leaders training small
    groups
  • Encourage discussion and questions
  • Faculty is given samples of all products and
    trained in their use
  • Gotchas
  • Minor incident reports (for teacher managed
    behavior)
  • Office referrals
  • Rules are posted in all classrooms, hallways, and
    throughout the building

31
Phase 3Implementing PBIS within the School
(continued)
  • Gotchas are collected and reinforcement systems
    are implemented
  • Students are acknowledged for appropriate
    behavior
  • Staff are acknowledged for their support of the
    program
  • Office referrals are logged into the SWIS system
    and are analyzed

32
Phase 3Implementing PBIS within the School
(continued)
  • PBIS Team meets at least monthly to coordinate
    on-going implementation, analyze data, and
    develop new interventions
  • Schools are encouraged to maintain a binder with
    all their school products, team notes, and other
    information for reference
  • A coach works with every school team to provide
    additional support, PBIS knowledge, and
    behavioral expertise
  • Schools are encouraged to attend state level and
    county level PBIS meetings for new ideas and
    support

33
Baltimore County Schools Trained in PBIS
34
Baltimore County Schools Trained in PBIS
35
Percentage of Baltimore County PBIS Schools
and Length of Time Implementing PBIS
(6)
(6)
(9)
(11)
36
How Well are Schools Implementing Concepts of
PBIS?
  • School Self-Report (Form A)
  • Completed monthly
  • Measures the number of critical features (22) in
    place
  • System-wide Evaluation Tool (SET)
  • Observational data from independent assessor
  • Completed annually
  • Measures the 7 features of school-wide
    implementation
  • Implementation Phases Inventory (IPI)
  • Completed semi-annually
  • Measures 4 levels of implementation
  • Measures 36 critical elements

37
Self-Report Data from Elementary SchoolsForm
APercentage of features in place
38
Self-Report Data from Middle SchoolsForm
APercentage of features in place
39
Self-Report Data from High SchoolsForm
APercentage of features in place
40
Self-Report Data from Form APercentage of
Features in Place
41
Systems-Wide Evaluation Tool (SET)
  • Research quality tool for assessing
    Universal/School-wide PBIS
  • External person spend 2 hours at school,
    reviewing documents, interviewing staff,
    interviewing students.
  • PBIS is in place with a score of at least 80
    Total
  • Measures 7 critical features of PBIS

42
Seven Critical Features of SET
  • Seven critical features of PBIS listed, defined,
    and scored within SET
  • Behavioral Expectations Defined
  • Behavioral Expectations Taught
  • On-Going System for Rewarding Behavioral
    Expectations
  • System for Responding to Behavioral Violations
  • Monitoring and Decision-Making
  • Management
  • District-Level Support

43
Pre- and Post-Training SET Scores
44
Implementation Phases Inventory (IPI)
  • Features of PBIS listed, defined and scored to
    obtain scores in the following categories
  • Preparation Phase
  • Initiation Phase
  • Implementation Phase
  • Maintenance Phase
  • Percentage of the 36 Critical Elements also
    obtained

45
Percentage of Baltimore County PBIS Schools and
their Implementation Phases
(7)
(8)
(6)
(5)
Based upon 26 schools
46
Implementation Phases InventoryPercentage of
Critical Features in Place
47
Discipline DataSuspensions Expulsions
  • Elementary School
  • Middle School
  • High School

48
Elementary SchoolSuspensions Expulsions
49
PBIS Elementary SchoolsAverage Number of
Suspensions Expulsions per Year
50
PBIS Middle SchoolsSuspensions Expulsions
51
PBIS Middle SchoolsAverage Number of Suspensions
Expulsions per Year
52
PBIS High SchoolSuspensions Expulsions
53
PBIS High SchoolsAverage Number of Suspensions
Expulsions per Year
54
PBIS Supports Academic AchievementAn Initial
Look at PBIS and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
  • Elementary School
  • Middle School
  • High School

55
Behavioral Support Enhances Academic
AchievementPercentage of PBIS Schools Making
Annual Yearly Progress
56
How does Behavior Support Help?
  • Behavior support improves minutes in instruction
  • Behavior support makes instructional minutes more
    effective
  • Behavior support creates a climate that is more
    calm and conducive to learning.

57
For additional information please
contactOffice of Psychological
ServicesBaltimore County Public
Schools410-887-0303
  • Joan Ledvina Parr
  • Linda Marchineck
  • Margaret Grady Kidder
  • Marylands PBIS website
  • jparr_at_bcps.org
  • lmarchineck_at_bcps.org
  • mkidder_at_bcps.org
  • www.pbismaryland.org

58
Building
Success
in
Schools
Baltimore Co
Time
at a
One Step
59
Thank you for your support as we continue to
REACH FOR THE STARS and help students believe
in themselves and achieve in Baltimore County
Schools
60
Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports in
Baltimore County Schools
61
Positive Behavioral InterventionsAnd
Supports(PBIS)
62
(No Transcript)
63
(No Transcript)
64
Behavioral and Academic Interventions
Behavioral Systems Academic Systems
1-5 Intensive Individual Interventions
6-20 Targeted Group Interventions
80 Universal Interventions
65
Tertiary Prevention Interagency
Partnerships Community Partnerships Court/
Institutional Liaisons Spot Light On Schools/
P.O.s Marylands Tomorrow Program Homeless
Program NW/SW IEP Team Individual Student IEP/
504 Plans Student Therapeutic Support Student
Threat Assessments Abuse and Neglect Reporting
Program (CPS Liaisons) Traumatic Loss Teams
Baltimore County 2004-2005 32 Schools 14 ES, 12
MS, 6 HS
5
15
Secondary Prevention Project Attend/ FACE School
Resource Officer Program D.A.R.E./ S.A.D.D.
Programs Student Assistance Programs Wellness
Centers Health Action Plans/ Appraisals Peer
Helper/ Mediation Programs Pupil Personnel Home
Visits/ Social Histories Instructional Support
Teams (IST) Functional Behavior
Assessments Behavior Intervention Plans
Educational/ Psychosocial Assessments Psychologic
al Assessments Student Case Management Social
Skills, Anger Management, Conflict
Resolution Parent Presentations/ Trainings
Alternative School/Program Placements
Primary Prevention School Improvement
Planning School Emergency Safety Plans Positive
Behavior Plans/ Codes Character Education
Programs Parent/ Family Resources Student Support
Teams Health Screenings/ Protocols School Nurse/
Assistant Services Essential Guidance
Curriculum School Counselor Services Pupil
Personnel Services Residency/ Attendance Officer
Services School Social Work Services School
Psychologist Services
80 of Students
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