Classroom Systems School-wide PBIS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Classroom Systems School-wide PBIS PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6eb8b6-YzE5N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Classroom Systems School-wide PBIS

Description:

CLASSROOM SYSTEMS SCHOOL-WIDE PBIS Chris Borgmeier, PhD Portland State University cborgmei_at_pdx.edu www.swpbis.pbworks.com (s) www.pbisclassroomsystems.pbworks.com – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:170
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 76
Provided by: ChrisB231
Learn more at: http://pbisclassroomsystems.pbworks.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Classroom Systems School-wide PBIS


1
Classroom SystemsSchool-wide PBIS
  • Chris Borgmeier, PhD
  • Portland State University
  • cborgmei_at_pdx.edu
  • www.swpbis.pbworks.com (slides)
  • www.pbisclassroomsystems.pbworks.com

2
School-wide Positive Behavior Support Systems
Classroom Setting Systems
Nonclassroom Setting Systems
Individual Student Systems
School-wide Systems
3
Non-example Action Plan Strategies
  • Purchase distribute classroom management
    curriculum/book
  • Discuss at faculty meeting
  • Bring in CM expert for next months ½ day
    in-service
  • Observe in effective classroom
  • Observe give feedback
  • What is likelihood of change in teacher
    practice?
  • (Sugai, 2006)

4
Example Action Plan Strategies
  • Build on SW System
  • Use school-wide leadership team
  • Use data to justify
  • Adopt evidence based practice
  • Teach/practice to fluency/automaticity
  • Ensure accurate implementation 1st time
  • Regular review active practice
  • Monitor implementation continuously
  • Acknowledge improvements
  • (Sugai, 2006)

5
Classroom SystemsBuilding Capacity v. One Shot
Support
  • Build systems to support sustained use of
    effective practices
  • SW leadership team
  • Regular data review
  • Regular individual school action planning
  • Regular support review
  • To begin school year throughout school year

6
Classroom Systems Focus School-wide Support
7
Classroom Practices Self Assessment
  • Staff completed the Classroom Practices Self
    Assessment on-line earlier this Fall
  • Plan to complete 3 times per year
  • Fall/ Winter/ Spring
  • Team collects data to
  • Strategically guide decision making re Profl
    Devt
  • Identify staff development topics/ areas of
    common need
  • Monitor progress

8
(No Transcript)
9
Looking for High Blue (Not or Partially In Place)
High Red (Priority)
10
ElementaryWinter 2012-13 Rankings
Not or Partial In Place High/Med Priority Total Rank
51 ratio 68 79 147
PreCorrect 79 95 174 1
Instrl Time 63 84 147
OTR 79 84 163 2
Correct Resp 74 89 163 3
T Group Work 74 84 158


School-wide Total In Place 54 Partial
42 Not In Place 4 Not Applicable
1
11
Targeted Classroom Practices
  • PreCorrection
  • Chronic problem behaviors are anticipated and
    precorrected.
  • 41 Ratio/ Praise
  • I acknowledge student positive behavior at least
    4 times more often than I acknowledge student
    problem behavior.

12
Classroom Systems Team Implementation
Support
13
Supporting Effective Classroom Practices
  • Most Evidence-Based Classroom Practices are not
    challenging to implement. and are pretty easily
    described and understood
  • The Challenge is using the practices consistently
    over time, doing the little things consistently.
    Building Habits

14
  • The Power of Habit Why we do what we do in life
    and business
  • Charles Duhigg
  • Video Intro

2 on NY Times Bestseller List on March 18th 2012
15
The Habit Loop from The Power of Habit
A habit is a formula our brain automatically
follows When I see a CUE, I will do ROUTINE in
order to get a REWARD.
16
Steps to Changing your Habits
  • Identify your Bad Habit Loop
  • Identify your habit/Routine to change
  • Look for Rewards
  • Isolate the Cue
  • Have a Plan for change
  • Identify your Replacement Behavior New Habit
  • Pair w/ Rewards

17
My Bad Habit Loop from The Power of Habit
A habit is a formula our brain automatically
follows When I see CUE, I will do ROUTINE in
order to get a REWARD.
Step 1 Identify your Habit I raise my voice,
scolding my daughter
Step 2 Look for Rewards I want her to stop
whining, screaming, yelling, tantrum, but raising
my voice usually further escalates so what is my
reward?.... I get to feel like Im doing
something letting her know this is not ok
Step 3 Isolate the Cue My terrible 2s
daughter is whining, screaming, yelling, throwing
a tantrum
18
The Habit Loop
A habit is a formula our brain automatically
follows When I see CUE, I will do ROUTINE in
order to get a REWARD.
When my 2 y.o. daughter starts whining (cue), I
will raise my voice (routine) in order to make me
feel like Im doing something let her know its
not OK to act this way (reward).
Step 4 Have a Plan Replace raising my voice
with calmly saying yelling is not ok and
consistently saying to her tell me what you want
occasionally prompting her with the words to
say this should provide me the Reward of
letting her know its not ok, doing something
and make me feel better and more controlled about
how Im responding and teaching her specifically
how to respond over time reducing the trantrums
whining
19
Integrating Power of Habit in to the Classroom
  • How can we support teachers to
  • Understand the Habit Loop
  • Build habits to use Evidence-based Classroom
    practices
  • Change Bad Habits in the classroom replace w/
    Evidence-based classroom practices

20
Next Steps
  • Teach staff the Habit Loop and how to change/
    develop good habits
  • Identify the Targeted Classroom Practice
    provide examples
  • 5 to 1 Ratio, PreCorrection
  • Brief presentation of practice
  • Time to individualize practice to fit your
    classroom, context needs
  • Brief presentation of Reminders Supports to use
    your practice
  • Time to develop an individualized Plan for Support

21
Classroom SystemsSchool-wide PBISIncreasing
Specific Praise (5 to 1 Ratio)
Chris Borgmeier, PhD Portland State
University cborgmei_at_pdx.edu
22
PBIS Classroom System Next Steps
  1. Brief presentation of practice
  2. Time to individualize practice to fit your
    classroom, context needs
  3. Brief presentation of Self-Monitoring use of your
    targeted practice
  4. Time to develop an individualized Self-Monitoring
    Plan

23
Follow Along in the 5 to 1 Ratio Guide
24
(No Transcript)
25
(No Transcript)
26
Definitions of Acknowledgement of Positive
Problem Behavior
  •  Acknowledgment responding to student behavior
    (verbal or gesture) in a way that provides
    attention for positive/desired behavior or
    problem/non-desired behavior.
  • The focus of the acknowledgement determines
    whether it is a positive (response to desired
    behavior) or problem acknowledgement (response to
    non-desired behavior), while the tone and verbage
    should always maintain respect for the
    individual, the determining factor is the type
    (desired v. non-desired) of the behavior being
    acknowledged.

27
Why Acknowledge Desired Behavior?
  • Reinforce the teaching of new behaviors
  • Behavior is likely to become a habit and recur in
    the future only if demonstrating it has been
    beneficial
  • Harness the influence of kids who are showing
    expected behaviors to encourage the kids who are
    not
  • Strengthen positive behaviors that can compete
    with problem behavior
  • Improve school climate
  • Create positive interactions and rapport with
    students

28
Why Increase Positive Acknowledgements?
  • After withdrawing praise from a classroom,
    off-task behavior increased from 8.7 to 25.5
  • In classes where teachers provided less than 65
    positive statements, the percentage of students
    reporting that they like school decreased over
    the course of the school year
  • In classes where teachers provided more than 70
    positive statements, students reporting that they
    like school remained high across the school year
  • Becker, Engleman, Thomas, 1975

29
51 Ratio
  • Pay attention to What you Want to See
  • Acknowledge positive behavior 5 times more often
    that you respond to negative behavior
  • Keep it genuine not the same for all kids
  • Negative interactions are not wrong and are
    sometimes necessary the key is the ratio
  • There is a ceiling effect at 13 to 1 but we are
    at very little risk of achieving this in schools
    more often we are at 11 or even more negatives
    than positives

30
Positive Interactions
  • Positive interactions can be provided in a
    variety of ways
  • verbal praise
  • positive feedback re appropriate behavior
  • nonverbal acknowledgement
  • smiling, nodding, winking

31
Research on Praise Acknowledging Positive
Behavior
  • Praise has the strongest research, with increases
    shown in
  • Students correct responses
  • Work productivity and accuracy
  • Academic performance
  • On-task behavior and attention
  • Compliance, positive comments about self
  • Cooperative play

Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, Sugai, 2008
32
Critical Features of Acknowledgement
  • Acknowledgment of Positive Behavior (praise) is
    most effective if it is immediate, specific,
    sincere, varied, student referenced
  • Immediate
  • Specific explicitly describes the desired
    behavior performed
  • Sincere credible and authentic
  • Varied varied word choice, varied academic and
    behavior praise, whole group, small group and
    individual
  • Student referenced compares student performance
    to previous performance and does not compare
    students to others acknowledge effort 

33
Positive Acknowledgement/ Praise examples
  •  Excellent job listening and following
    directions the first time.
  • Your eyes are on me and your mouth is quiet.
    Thank you for being ready to learn.
  • Wow, you completed your math work correctly
    before the end of class.

34
When Acknowledging Positive Behavior
  • Identify the specific behavior being acknowledged
  • Link the behavior to one of the SW-Rules
  • GOOD EXAMPLE
  • Wow, thank you for helping to clean up the
    spill, that was very Responsible of you
  • NOT AS GOOD
  • Thank you, good job!

35
Procedural Steps for increasing Positive
Acknowledgement Ratio
  1. Identify challenging times, routines and
    behaviors that occur throughout the day
  2. Identify desired behaviors to focus on praising,
    particularly during challenging times
  3. Explicitly teach students to engage in desired
    behaviors

36
Procedural Steps for increasing Positive
Acknowledgement Ratio
  • Identify a range of phrases, gestures, methods
    for acknowledging targeted desired behaviors,
    particularly identify ways to replace corrections
    with acknowledgement of proximal peers for
    desired behavior
  • Monitor for desired behaviors acknowledge
    individuals or group of students immediately
    following desired behavior
  • Implement personal prompts and monitoring to
    encourage replacement of corrections with
    acknowledgments

37
Increase Positive Feedback Decreasing Negative
  • ID a specific problem behavior you would like to
    see less of and define the opposite of this
    behavior
  • Teach re-teach the expected/desired behavior
  • Provide precorrections in advance to set up
    positive behavior
  • Ignore the problem behavior and catch the
    students meeting expectations w/ specific
    positive feedback
  • Coaching Classroom Management, 2006

38
Step 1 Identify Challenges Positive
Acknowledgements
39
Your Turn
  • Take a few minutes to Complete Step 1 of the
    Worksheet
  • Remember, wed like to collect a copy of your
    worksheet at the end of the training today to
    plan for support

40
FLIP THE RATIOTrading Negative Acknowledgements
for Positive
41
Your Turn
  • Take a few minutes to Complete Step 2 of the
    Worksheet
  • Share your strategies with a partner

42
Set up Systems to Increase Positive
Acknowledgement
Students Teacher
  • Good Behavior Game
  • T-chart
  • Teach behavioral expectations
  • Students earn points for positive behavior
  • Teacher gets points for negative behavior
  • Total points at end to determine if reward is
    earned
  • Hand out Acknowledgement Tokens or Tallies for
    positive behavior
  • Individuals or Pre-arranged Groups in the
    classroom

43
Ways to Encourage Monitor your Ratio
  • Post a visual reminder to praise students in area
    viewed frequently
  • Praise in Pairs After praising one student, find
    another student exhibiting similar behavior to
    praise
  • Acknowledge creatively use gestures (thumbs up,
    OK sign, clapping, nod, high five) tangibles
    (stickers, stars), points toward whole class or
    individual reward, calling parent to report
    student success

44
PLAN FOR SUPPORTING IMPLEMENTATION
45
Self Monitoring
  • Training on classroom management practices alone
    does not result in changes or improved practice
  • Self-monitoring offers an effective, efficient
    strategy for improving implementation of
    classroom practices
  • (Simonsen, MacSuga, Fallon Sugai, 2013)

46
Self Monitoring
  • Strategies for Self-Monitoring
  • Index Card Tearing (long side for positive, short
    side for negative)
  • Hash marks on tape on your arm or pant leg
  • Golf Counter
  • Move Pennies or paperclips from one pocket to
    other based positive negative acknowledgements

47
Step 3 Self-Monitoring Plan
48
Your Turn
  • Take a few minutes to Complete Step 3 of the
    Worksheet
  • Make sure to Identify meaningful feasible
    supports
  • Identify your strategy for Self-Monitoring
  • Develop Peer Strategies for support you can
    discuss with a peer

49
Team School-wide Supports
  • Team Supports (e.g. Dept., Grade Level, PLC)
  • Make Classroom improvement a regular part of
    meetings and activities
  • Begin meeting w/ 2 minute check
  • Check-in, share ideas give feedback to
  • Encourage implementation
  • Check-in, problem solve, enhance implementation
  • School-wide Supports
  • Reminder on Morning announcements
  • Regular review/check-in at staff meeting
  • Rewards for implementers
  • Recognize your Buddy
  • Recognize someone you observed engage in the
    practice
  • Daily or weekly implementation checks
  • via email link
  • Put sticker on staff board to rate implementation

50
Group Discussion
  • What school-wide strategies would be helpful for
    you in supporting your implementation?
  • Regular reminders over announcements?
  • Staff meeting review sharing?
  • Collect implementation data?
  • Daily email, survey monkey?

51
References
  • Descriptive Readings
  • Brophy, J. (1981). Teacher Praise A Functional
    Analysis. Review of Educational Research, 51(1),
    5-32.
  • Conroy, M. A., Sutherland, K. S., Snyder, A.,
    Al-Hendawi, M. Vo, A. (2009). Creating a
    positive classroom atmosphere Teachers use of
    effective praise and feedback. Beyond Behavior,
    18(2), pp. 18-26.
  • Gable, R. A., Hester, P. H., Rock, M. L.,
    Hughes, K. G. (2009). Back to Basics Rules,
    Praise, Ignoring, and Reprimands Revisited.
    Article. Intervention in School and Clinic,
    44(4), 195-205.
  • Simonsen, B., Fairbanks, S., Briesch, A., Myers,
    D. Sugai, G. (2008). Evidence-based practices
    in classroom management Considerations for
    Research to practice. Education and Treatment of
    Children, 31(3), pp. 351-380.
  • Sprick, R., Knight, J., Reinke, W., Skyles, T.,
    Barnes, L. (2009). Coaching Classroom Management
    Strategies and tools for administrators and
    coaches (2nd ed). Pacific NorthWest Publishing,
    Eugene, OR.
  • Research Studies demonstrating outcomes
    associated with the use of praise to reprimand
  • Becker, W.C., Engelmann, S., Thomas, D.R.
    (1975). Teaching 2 Cognitive Learning and
    Instruction. Chicago Science Research
    Associates.
  • Pfiffner, L. J., Rosen, L. A., O'Leary, S. G.
    (1985). The efficacy of an all-positive approach
    to classroom management. Research Support,
    Non-U.S. Gov't. Journal of Applied Behavior
    Analysis, 18(3), 257-261.
  • Sutherland, K. S., Wehby, J. H., Copeland, S.
    R. (2000). Effect of varying rates of
    behavior-specific praise on the on-task behavior
    of students with EBD. Journal of Emotional and
    Behavioral Disorders, 8(1), 2-.
  • Relationship between praise, rewards, and
    intrinsic motivation
  • Akin-Little, K. A., Eckert, T. L., Lovett, B. J.,
    Little, S. G. (2004). Extrinsic reinforcement
    in the classroom Bribery or best practice.
    Article. School Psychology Review, 33(3),
    344-362.
  • Cameron, J., Pierce, W. D. (1994).
    Reinforcement, Reward, and Intrinsic Motivation
    A meta-analysis. Review of Educational Research,
    64(3), 363-423.
  • Deci, E. L., Koestner, R., Ryan, R. M. (1999).
    A meta-analytic review of experiments examining
    the effects of extrinsic rewards on intrinsic
    motivation. Psychological Bulletin, 125(6),
    627-668.

52
Pilot Study 1
  • Middle School

53
Participants and Setting
  • Participants
  • N10
  • All female
  • All general educators
  • Subjects taught
  • Language Arts (1), Math (1), Social Studies (3),
    Science (2), Reading (1), English Language
    Development (1), and Spanish (1)

54
Data Collection
  • Direct observation of frequency of teacher
  • Behavior Specific Praise
  • Ex I really appreciate how you are sitting with
    your legs under your desk and your eyes on the
    speaker during whole group instruction.
  • General Praise
  • Ex Nice job!
  • Reprimand
  • Ex Shh or Dont do that
  • PreCorrection
  • Ex Please remember to be in your desk working
    on your warm-up when the bell rings

55
Teacher Variation in Baseline
  • Teachers varied widely in their feedback for
    student behavior and academic performance
  • Some teachers provided
  • Little or no feedback on student performance
  • Lots of feedback on student performance
  • Acknowledgement for only inappropriate student
    behavior
  • Little or no feedback for appropriate student
    behavior
  • Few opportunities to respond
  • Seldom observed teachers using precorrection

56
Research Question
  • Can school-wide systems prompt teachers to change
    their classroom behavior in their use of
  • Praise
  • Reprimand
  • PreCorrection

57
Results
58
(No Transcript)
59
(No Transcript)
60
Data Analysis
  • Praise and Reprimand (n3)
  • Inconsistent results, no clear pattern over all 5
    observations
  • PreCorrection (n2)
  • After intervention, used PreCorrection at the
    beginning of their class
  • However, did not sustain the intervention over
    all 5 observations

61
(No Transcript)
62
School 2

K-5 Elementary School 348 students 85 Free or
Reduced Lunch
63
(No Transcript)
64
(No Transcript)
65
(No Transcript)
66
1000 Classroom Observation Study
5.4 Pos. Feedback / Hour
  • Total Classrm Obs.
  • Elem 1515
  • MS 725
  • HS 1381

67
Teacher 1
Teacher 2
Teacher 3
Teacher 4
5.4 Praise/Hr
68
Teacher 1
Teacher 2
Teacher 3
Teacher 4
5.4 Praise/Hr
69
Teacher 1
Teacher 2
Teacher 3
Teacher 4
70
4th/5th Teacher 1
5.4 Praise/Hr
71
3rd Grade -- Teacher 1
5.4 Praise/Hr
72
(No Transcript)
73
(No Transcript)
74
Self-Monitoring Goal Setting in PLCs
  • Collect 2-3 days of baseline data before setting
    a goal

75
How are you collecting self-monitoring data?
  • Golf counter 5
  • Tally marks 16
  • Sticky note on arm 1
  • Sticky note on back of name tag 4
  • Sticky note on table 1
  • Tally sheet 8
  • On the board 2
  • Paper Clip System 1
  • Tears on paper 1

76
(No Transcript)
77
(No Transcript)
78
(No Transcript)
79
(No Transcript)
80
Whats next?
  • SW-PBIS team continues supporting
    implementation
  • Daily email prompts to enter self-monitoring data
  • Weekly PLC meetings to review data evaluate
    goals
  • Observation walkthroughs x principal, coach
    PBIS team members (tracking specific praise
    precorrection)
  • Rewards for data entry, meeting goals and
  • Continue collecting staff Self Monitoring data
    for 4-6 weeks
  • Decide whether to move on to training next
    behavior(s)

81
  • 10 of 19 staff members reported they had
    continued to self-monitor 8 weeks after team
    requests for self-monitoring data

82
(No Transcript)
83
(No Transcript)
84
Questions? Suggestions?
  • Chris Borgmeier
  • cborgmei_at_pdx.edu
  • www.pbisclassroomsystems.pbworks.com
About PowerShow.com