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Chapter 23 World War I

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Title: Chapter 23 World War I


1
Chapter 23 World War I The student will
understand the general causes of WWI, and
the events and causes that led to U.S. entry into
the war. AL COS 11th grade 5  
  • READ LIFE IN THE TRENCHES (in the closet).

WWI music http//www.firstworldwar.com/audio/1914.
htm http//www.emory.edu/ENGLISH/LostPoets/B37.htm
l for quicktime
2
Four causes of War were alliances, imperialism,
militarism, and nationalism.
Alliances designed for nations to increase
safety, but instead led to the splitting of
Europe and an automatic declaration of war among
the countries
3
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4
ImperialismThe competition to grab colonies in
the world increased the chance of war.
5
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6
Militarism aggressively building up ones
military in preparation for war.
Battleships the most powerful Naval weapon of
its day
German submarine
7
  • Nationalism intense pride for ones homeland,
    was a powerful idea in Europe in the late 1800s. ?
  • The right to self-determination, the idea that
    people who belong to a nation should have their
    own country and government, was a basic idea of
    nationalism. ?
  • This idea led to a crisis in the Balkans where
    different national groups within the Ottoman and
    Austro-Hungarian Empires began to seek
    independence.

(pages 577580)
Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to
display the information.
8
  • The Serbs in 1908, became furious when
    Austria-Hungary annexed Bosnia (test).
  • One group formed because of this was the Black
    Hand.

9
  • The DISPUTED AREA BEFORE AND AFTER THE WAR!

10
Causes
II. The Spark GET SHEET OF EVENTS
Francis Ferdinand assassinated by Gavrilo
Princep of the Black Hand which was the spark
or immediate cause that started WWI (1914-1919).
11
Gavrilo Princip
  • Gavrilo Princip was the son of a postman.
  • He was the youngest out of a huge family, they
    didnt have very much money.
  • He was diagnosed at a young age with tuberculosis
    and that is why he decided to kill Ferdinand.
  • I want my life to be remembered.-Princip

12
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13
Afterwards.
  • After Gavrilo was arrested and the Archduke was
    murdered, Serbia started writing apologetic
    letters to Austria- Hungary.
  • First, Serbia had to make sure that Germany was
    going to keep its military alliance.
  • Austria- Hungary made several demands and gave
    Serbia only 48 hours to respond, they accepted
    all demands.

14
mobilization readying troops for war. (GRE)
Central Powers Germany, Austria-Hungary and the
Ottoman Empire (Turkey).
15
Allies Russia, France, Serbia, Great Britain
and, later, the U.S. (1917).
16
  • Causes of World War I
  • The Spark that leads to World War I
  •  Archduke Franz Ferdinand visits Sarajevo, June
    28, 1914 in car.
  • Gavrilo Princip (of the Black Hand), a Serbian
    nationalist, shoots Ferdinand.
  • Germany issues Austria-Hungary reassurance or a
    blank check.
  • Austria-Hungary threatens Serbia and mobilizes
    July 1914.
  • Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia on July
    28, 1914.
  • Russia mobilizes in response to the threat to
    Serbia on July 30, 1914.
  • Germany reacts to Russias mobilization and
    mobilizes.
  • Germany declares war on Russia on August 1, 1914.
  • France and Great Britain mobilize as promised in
    their Triple Entente agreement.
  • Germany declares war on France, August 3, 1914.
  • Germany invades neutral Belgium in order to
    attack France, August 3, 1914.
  • Britain declares war in response to this invasion
    on August 4, 1914.
  • WORLD WAR I BEGINS.

17
Schlieffen Plan Germany generals plan to fight
a two front war. It failed.
18
stalemate a situation in which neither side is
able to gain an advantage caused in part
because of old war strategies and new weapons.
This would describe the western front for the
first few years of the war. TRENCH WARFARE
19
You Dont Say 3-1a
Stalemate A stalemate occurs in the game of
chess when one player cannot make any move
without putting his or her king in a position to
be captured, and thus lose the game. It is an apt
term for the deadlock along the Western Front.
20
On Christmas Day 1914, the fighting stopped, and
British and German soldiers met in no-mans-land
to chat, play soccer, and pose for photographs.
Officers quickly ended these goodwill meetings
and the soldiers returned to war.
21
Aerial view of France and trenches
22
The Trench System
Blake Crosbys PowerPoint for next 8 slides.
  • Trenches were most important because of their
    defensive value.
  • Trenches have been being used since the beginning
    of warfare.
  • Soldiers are always looking for a safe place to
    stay during wars, and for the most part trenches
    were the answer.

23
Fire Trench
  • The Fire Trench was the closest to the enemy.
  • Fire Trenches were usually reinforced by sandbags
    for extra protection.
  • Fire Trenches had a special step so the soldiers
    could see over the trench walls.

http//www.liverpoolscottish.org.uk/1914fielddefen
cetrenchtype1.jpg
24
Saps
  • Saps were very small trenches that came out as
    far as the officers would put them.
  • They were for surveillance and early warning.
  • Soldiers could pick up valuable information from
    the saps.

25
No Mans Land
  • No Mans Land was the area between the trenches.
  • In No Mans Land there was barbed wire,
    artillery, and gas.
  • It was the most dangerous place in the war.

26
Snipers
  • Snipers were set in the trenches also they would
    help the machine guns take out the charging
    troops
  • They didnt have very good range but were very
    good shots.
  • They could only shoot a few times before the
    enemy was upon them

27
Machine Guns
  • The machine guns took more lives of the charging
    troops than anything else
  • They would take out thousands at a time
  • They rapidly shot until they were over ran by
    enemy troops

28
Aerial view of France and trenches
29
Lachrymator (tearing agent) Much
like today's tear gas and mace, this gas caused
temporary blindness and greatly inflamed the nose
and throat of the victim. A gas
mask offered very good protection from this type
of gas. xylyl bromide was a popular tearing agent
since it was easily brewed. Asphyxiant
These are the poisonous gases.
This class includes chlorine, phosgene and
diphosgene. Chlorine inflicts damage by forming
hydrochloric acid when coming in
contact with moisture such as found in the lungs
and eyes. It is lethal at a mix of 15000
(gas/air) whereas phosgene is
deadly at 110,000 (gas/air) - twice as toxic!
Diphosgene, first used by the Germans at Verdun
on 22-Jun-1916, was deadlier still
and could not be effectively filtered by standard
issue gas masks. Blistering Agent
Dichlorethylsulphide the most dreaded
of all chemical weapons in World War I - mustard
gas. Unlike the other gases which attack
the respiratory system, this gas acts on any
exposed, moist skin. This includes, but is not
limited to, the eyes, lungs, armpits and groin.
A gas mask could offer very little
protection. The oily agent would produce large
burn-like blisters wherever it came in contact
with skin. It also had a nasty way
of hanging about in low areas for hours, even
days, after being dispersed. A soldier jumping
into a shell crater to seek cover
could find himself blinded, with skin blistering
and lungs bleeding.   List of gases
used in World War I benzyl bromide
German, tearing, first used 1915
bromacetone Both sides,
tearing/fatal in concentration, first used 1916
carbonyl chloride (phosgene)
both sides, asphyxiant, fatal with delayed
action, first used 1915 chlorine
both sides, asphyxiant, fatal in
concentration, first used in 1915, cylinder
release only chloromethyl
chloroformate both sides, tearing,
first used in 1915, artillery shell
chloropircin both sides, tearing,
first used in 1916, artillery shell (green cross
I) cyanogen (cyanide) compounds
allies/Austria, asphyxiant, fatal in
concentration, first used in 1916, artillery
shell dichlormethylether
German, tearing, first used 1918, artillery shell
dibrommethylethylketone
German, tearing, fatal in concentration, first
used in 1916 dichloroethylsulphide
(mustard gas) both sides,
blistering, artillery shell (yellow cross)
diphenylchloroarsine German,
asphyxiant, fatal in concentration, (dust - could
not be filtered), first used in 1917, artillery
shell (blue cross) diphenylcyonoarsine
German, more powerful replacement
for blue cross, first used in 1918
ethyldichloroarsine German, less
powerful replacement for blue cross, first used
in 1918, artillery shell (yellow cross I, green
cross III) ethyl iodoacetate
British, tearing, first used in 1916
monobrommethylethylketone German,
more powerful replacement for bromacetone, first
used 1916 trichloromethylchloroformate
(diphosgene) both sides,
asphyxiant, fatal with delayed action, first used
1916 xylyl bromide
German, tearing, first used 1915  
30
Commanding Officers
  • With life in the trenches the officers were in
    charge
  • They commanding officer would yell over the top
    and lead his men into No mans land
  • The officer second in command would stay behind
    and kill the men that didnt go over the top

31
Disease in the trenches
  • The most common disease in the trenches was
    Trench Foot
  • This disease was basically rotting of the foot
  • This disease made it very hard for the soldiers
    to fight

32
soldiers-learn-to-pack video
33
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34
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35
III. American Reaction A. Call for
neutrality most Americans wanted to
ensure that the U.S. could stay out
of the war B. Pro-British groups and
arguments C. Pro-German groups
36
American response many felt personally involved
since they were first or second generation
immigrants from the fighting countries. Also,
some Americans saw the Germans as possessing
militarism and cold-blooded efficiency. Autocrat
a ruler with unlimited power.
37
IV. Difficulties of neutrality A. British
treatment of U.S. B. German treatment of
U.S. 1. Financed espionage in
American war plants 2. Germany
continued sinking American ships
3. Tried to convince Mexico to
attack the U.S.
38
C. Lusitania note (see AH book neutral
ship?) D. Further movement away from
neutrality 1. Financial linksthe U.S. began
to lend money to the Europeans
in 1915 because Wilson feared the
economic, financial, and social
consequences of American industrys
failing to secure European business

39
1914 Allied 824,860,237
Central 169,289,777
1915 Allies 1,991,747,493 Central
11,878,153
1916 Allies 3,214,480,547
Central 279,786,219
40
American businesses favored war with Germany
because of the huge loans to the Allies.
41
2. British propagandaeffective in turning
the U.S. against Germany
42
British propaganda contributed to shifting U.S.
public opinion by portraying Germans as
uncivilized. U-boats were also considered
uncivilized (GRE) .
43
British Propaganda
www.firstworldwar.com
44
3. Election of 1916main issue was the war in
Europe Woodrow Wilson ran on the slogan in the
1916 election He kept us out of war.
4. Lusitania note-- U.S. demands that
Germany cease unrestricted submarine
warfare.
45
Lusitania a British passenger liner that was
sunk by a U-boat, killing 1195 passengers
including 128 Americans (GRE).
46
5. Sussex pledgeGerman promise to warn
ships before sinking

47

Sussex pledge the German government again
promised that U-boats would warn ships before
attacking. They would break this promise. But
the German government gambled that they could
end the war before the U.S. would enter. May 31,
1916visit and search rules Germany demands
same of GB. Resume Jan. 31, 1917 unrestricted
warfare
48
U-boat German submarine considered uncivilized
to not give warning. Unterseeboot
1917 146 u-boats on patrol
UC 44 Class U-boat 1) Aft torpedo tubes 2)
Electric motor 3) Main engine 4) Control room 5)
Mine tubes 6) Forward torpedo tubes 7) Crew
quarters
49
6. Unrestricted U-boat warfare German
resumed it believing that they could win the
war before U.S. troops reached the front
(1917) -germans-attack-us-navy-boats

50
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51
U-boat cartoons
52
U-boats Lost in action U5 Sunk in the North
Sea, December, 1914. U6 Destroyed by
Submarine E16, in the North Sea, 15th September,
1915. U7 Sunk in the North Sea, January,
1915. U8 Sunk by Destroyers MAORI and GHURKA,
in Straits of Dover, 4th March, 1915. U10
Sunk in the North Sea, May, 1916. U11 Sunk in
the North Sea, December, 1914. U12 Rammed by
Destroyer ARIEL, off Aberdeen Coast, 10th March,
1915. U13 Sunk in the North Sea, 12th
September, 1914. U14 Rammed by Trawler HAWK,
after being diabled by gunfire, off Peterhead,
5th June, 1915. U15 Rammed by Light Cruiser
BIRMINGHAM, off the Orkneys, 9th August, 1914.
U18 Rammed by Minesweeping Trawler 96, one mile
off Hoxa entrance to Scapa Flow, 24th November,
1914. U23 Torpedoed by submarine C27, working
in conjunction with trawler PRINCESS LOUISE, in
the North Sea, 20th July, 1915. U26 Lost in
the Baltic, August, 1915. U27 Sunk off the
South of Ireland, 19th August, 1915. U28
Destroyed in the White Sea, 2nd September, 1917.
U29 Rammed by Battleship DREADNOUGHT, 18th
March, 1915. U31 Destroyed, January, 1915.
U32 Destroyed in the Mediterranean, 8th May,
1918. U34 Sunk in the Mediterranean, 9th
November, 1918. U36 Sunk by gunfire of
Special Service Vessel PRINCE CHARLES, near North
Rona, 24th July, 1915. U37 Lost in the North
Sea, about June, 1915. U40 Sunk by the
submarine C24, working in conjunction with a
trawler, 50 miles SE by S of Girdle Ness, 23rd
June, 1915. U41 sunk by armed merchant
cruiser BARALONG, off South of Ireland, 24th
September, 1915. U44 destroyed in the North
Sea, 12th August, 1917. U45 Torpedoed by
Submarine D7, off North of Ireland, 12th
September,1917. U48 Destroyed by gunfire of
destroyer GIPSY and five drifters, while stranded
on Goodwins, 24th November, 1917. U49 Rammed
by P61, in the Atlantic, 11th September, 1917.
U50 Lost in the North Sea, between 1st and 11th
October, 1917. U51 Torpedoed by submarine H5,
in Helgoland Bight, 14th July, 1916. U56
Destroyed in the Artic Sea, 2nd November,1916.
U58 Sunk by U.S. Destroyers FANNING and
NICHOLSON, off South of Ireland, 17th November,
1917. U59 Destroyed in the North Sea, 14th
May, 1917. U61 Sunk in St. George's Channel,
26th March 1918. U64 Destroyed in the
Mediterranean, 17th June, 1918. U66 Lost in
the North Sea, between 1st and 11th October,
1917. U68 Sunk off of the South of Ireland,
22nd March, 1916. U69 Sunk by destroyer
PATRIOT, in the North Sea, 12th July, 1917.
U74 Sunk in the North Sea, 27th May, 1916.
U75 Sunk in the North Sea, 13th December, 1917.
U76 Sunk in the Arctic Sea, 26th May, 1917.
U77 Lost in the North Sea, 7th July, 1916.
U78 Destroyed by submarine G2, in the North Sea,
28th October, 1918. U81 Destroyed in the
Atlantic, 1st May, 1917. U83 Sunk off S.W. of
Ireland, 17th February, 1917. U84 Sunk in St.
Georges Channel, 26th January, 1918. U85 Sunk
in English Channel, 12th March, 1917. U87
Sunk in the Irish Sea, 25th December, 1917.
U88 Sunk in the Atlantic, 17th September, 1917.
U89 Rammed by cruiser ROXBURGH, off N.E. of
Ireland, 12th February, 1918. U92 Sunk in the
North Sea, 9th September, 1918. U93 Sunk by
Special Service Vessel PRIZE, in English Channel,
7th January, 1918. U95 Lost about January,
1918. U99 Sunk off the west of Ireland, 20th
June, 1917. U102 Lost, probably in the North
Sea, September, 1918. U103 Rammed by S.S.
OLYMPIC, in English Channel, 12th May, 1918.
U104 Sunk by sloop JESSAMINE, off South of
Ireland, 25th April, 1918 U106 Lost in the
North Sea, between 5th and 9th October, 1917.
U109 Destroyed in Dover area, 26th January,
1918. U110 Sunk off North of Ireland, 15th
March, 1918. U154 Torpedoed by submarine E35,
in the Atlantic, in Latitude of Cape St. Vincent,
11th May, 1918. U156 Sunk in the North Sea,
25th September, 1918. UB1 Lost in the
Mediteranean, around August, 1915. UB3 Sunk
in the North Sea, 24th April, 1916. UB4 Sunk
in the North Sea, 11th August, 1915. UB7
Destroyed by Russians, in Black Sea, October
1916. UB12 Lost in the North Sea, about
August, 1918. UB13 Lost March, 1916.
UB15 Lost in the Mediteranean, about May, 1916.
UB16 Sunk by Submarine E34, in the North
Sea, 10th May, 1918. UB17 Sunk in English
Channel, 25th February, 1918. UB18 Sunk in
English Channel, 17th November, 1917. UB19
Sunk by Special Service Ship PENHURST, in English
Channel, 30th November, 1916. UB20 Destroyed
by Seaplanes 8676 and 8862, in the North Sea,
29th July, 1917. UB22 Sunk in the North Sea,
19th January, 1918. UB26 Sunk in the English
Channel, 5th April, 1916 subsequently salved by
the French, and commisioned as ROLAND MOULLOT.
UB27 Sunk in the North Sea, 29th July, 1917.
UB29 Sunk by Destroyer ARIEL 12 miles SW of
Bishop Rock Ligthhouse, 6th December, 1916.
UB30 Sunk in the North Sea, 13th August, 1918.
UB31 Destroyed in Dover area, 2nd May, 1918.
UB32 Destroyed by seaplane 9860, 27 miles
North of Cape Barfleur, 18th August, 1917.
UB33 Mined in Dover area, 11th April, 1918.
UB35 Destroyed in Dover Area, 26th January,
1918. UB36 Lost in June, 1917. UB37
Destroyed by Special Service Ship PENHURST, in
English Channel, 14th January, 1917. UB38
Destroyed in Dover area, 8th February, 1918.
UB39 Sunk in English Channel, 17th May, 1917.
UB41 Sunk in the North Sea, 5th October, 1917.
UB44 Destroyed in the Mediterranean, 30th
July, 1916. UB45 Sunk in the Black Sea, 30th
October, 1916. UB46 Sunk in the Dardanelles,
16th December 1916. UB52 Torpedoed by
Submarine H4, in the Adriatic, 23rd May, 1918.
UB53 Sunk in the Adriatic, 3rd August, 1918.
UB54 Sunk in the North Sea, 11th March, 1918.
UB55 Sunk in Dover area, 22nd April, 1918.
UB56 Sunk in Dover area, 19th, December 1917.
UB57 Sunk in the North Sea, 14th August, 1918.
UB58 Sunk in Dover area, 10th March 1918.
UB61 Sunk in the North Sea, 29th November,
1917. UB63 Sunk in the North Sea, 28th
January, 1918. UB65 Destroyed by explosion
of own torpedo on 10th July, 1918. UB66 Sunk
in the Mediterranean, 18th January, 1918.
UB68 Scuttled by crew after being disabled by
gunfire of Sloop SNAPDRAGON and Trawler CRADOSIN,
4th October, 1918. UB69 Sunk in the
Mediterranean, 8th January, 1918. UB70 Sunk
in the Mediterranean, by British Destroyer
BASILISK and USS SYDONIA, 8th May 1918. UB71
Sunk in Straits of Gibraltar, 21st April, 1918.
UB72 Torpedoed in English Channel, 12 May,
1918. UB74 Rammed and depth charged, by
Armed Yacht LORNA, off Portland Bill, 26th May,
1918. UB75 Sunk in the North Sea, 10th
December, 1917. UB78 Sunk in the English
Channel, 9th May, 1918. UB81 Sunk in English
Channel, 2nd December, 1917. UB82 Sunk off
North of Ireland, 17th April, 1918. UB83
Sunk in the North Sea, 10th September, 1918.
UB85 Sunk in the Irish Sea, 30th April 1918.
UB90 Sunk in action with Submarine L12, off
Norwegian Coast, 16th October, 1918. UB103
Destroyed in Dover area, 16th September 1918.
UB104 Sunk in the North Sea, 19th September,
1918. UB107 Sunk in the North Sea, 27th
July, 1918. UB108 Lost about July, 1918.
UB109 Destroyed in Dover area, 29th August,
1918. UB110 Rammed by Destroyer GARRY, off
Roker, 19th July, 1918, adn subsequently raised
by the British. UB113 Lost probably in the
North Sea, September, 1918. UB115 Sunk in
the North Sea, 29th September, 1918. UB116
Sunk in the North Sea, 28th October, 1918.
UB119 Lost about May, 1918. UB123 Sunk in
the North Sea, 19th October, 1918. UB124
Sunk off North of Ireland, 20th July, 1918.
UB127 Lost, probably in the North Sea,
September, 1918. UC1 Sunk in the North Sea,
24th July, 1917. UC2 Sunk in the North Sea,
2nd July, 1915. UC3 Sunk in the North Sea,
23trd April, 1916. UC5 Captured while
stranded on Shipwash Shoal, 27th April, 1916.
UC6 Sunk in the North Sea, 28th September,
1917. UC7 Sunk in the North Sea, 21st
August, 1916. UC8 Stranded on Trschelling,
6th November 1915, and acquired by Dutch Navy as
M1. UC9 Sunk in the North Sea, about
October, 1915. UC10 Sunk in the North sea,
6th July, 1916. UC11 Sunk in the North Sea,
26th June, 1918. UC12 Sunk in the
Mediterranean, 17th March 1916. UC13 Sunk by
the Russians, in the Black Sea, about November,
1916. UC14 Sunk in the North Sea, about
October, 1917. UC15 Sunk in the Black Sea,
November, 1916. UC16 Destroyed by Destroyer
MELAMPUS off Selsea Bill, 23rd October, 1917.
UC18 Sunk in the North Sea, 12th March 1917.
UC19 Destroyed by Destroyer LLEWELLYN, in
Straits of Dover, 4th December, 1916. UC21
Sunk in the North Sea, 27th September, 1917.
UC24 Sunk off Cattaro, 24th May, 1917. UC26
Rammed by Destroyer MILNE, off mouth of Thames,
9th May 1917. UC29 Sunk off SW of Ireland,
7th June, 1917. UC30 Sunk in the North Sea,
19th April, 1917. UC32 Sunk in the North
Sea, 23rd February, 1917. UC33 Sunk in the
Irish Sea, 26th September, 1917. UC35 Sunk
by French Patrol Vessel AILLY, off Sardinian
Coast, 16th May, 1918. UC36 Destroyed by
Seaplane 8663, 20 miles ENE of Noord Hinder
Lightship, 20th May, 1917. UC38 Sunk in the
Mediterranean, 14th December, 1917. UC39
Sunk in the North Sea, 8th February, 1917.
UC41 Sunk in the North Sea, 21st August, 1917.
UC42 Sunk off South of Ireland, 10th
September, 1917. UC43 Torpedoed by Submarine
G13, about 9 miles NW of Muckle Flugga
Lighthouse, 10th March, 1917. UC44 Mined off
South of Ireland, 4th August, 1917. UC46
Rammed by destroyer LIBERTY, in Straits of Dover,
8th February, 1917. UC47 Sunk by P57 in the
North Sea, 18th November, 1917. UC49 Sunk in
the North Sea, 31st May, 1918. UC50 Sunk by
the Destroyer ZUBIAN, in English Channel, 4th
February, 1918. UC51 Sunk by Destroyer
FIREDRAKE, in the North Sea, 13th November, 1917.
UC55 Sunk in the North Sea, 29th September,
1917. UC57 Lost in the Baltic, between 19th
and 22nd November, 1917. UC62 Lost in the
North Sea, about October 1917. UC63 Sunk by
Submarine E52, near Straits of Dover, 1st
November, 1917. UC64 Destroyed in Dover
area, 20th June 1918. UC65 Torpedoed by
Submarine C15, 3rd November, 1917. UC66 Sunk
in English Channel, 12th June, 1917. UC68
Sunk by Submarine C7, in the North Sea, 5th April
1917. UC69 Sunk in the English Channel, 6th
December, 1917. UC70 Sunk in the North Sea,
28th August 1918. UC72 Sunk in the North
Sea, 22nd September, 1917. UC75 Rammed by
Destroyer FAIRY, in the North Sea, 31st May,
1918. UC77 Destroyed in Dover area, 10th
July, 1918. UC78 Destroyed in Dover area,
2nd May, 1918. UC79 Sunk by Submarine E45,
in the North Sea, 19th October, 1917.
U-boats
lost after the Armistice U16 Foundered, in
the Elbe, on voyage to England to surrender, 22nd
February, 1919. U21 Sunk in the North Sea, on
voyage to England to surrender, 22nd February,
1919. U60 Surrendered and subsequently
foundered 9 miles S.E. of Berry Head, 12th June,
1919. U97 Foundered on voyage to England to
surrender, 21st November, 1918. UB89
Foundered, on voyage to England to surrender.
UC40 Foundered, on voyage to England to to
surrender, 21st February, 1919. UC71 Sunk
off Heligoland, 20th February, 1919. UC91
Foundered the North Sea, on voyage to England to
surrender, 10th February, 1919.
53

7. Zimmermann telegramproposed an alliance
between Germany and Mexico to attack the
U.S. in return Mexico would receive Texas,
Arizona, and N. Mexico
54
Zimmermann note Germanys foreign secretary
made a secret offer to Mexico to attack the U.S.
(Feb . 1917) (GRE)
55
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56
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57
Warmup List at least five causes why the
United States entered the war against Germany
during WWI.
58
Russian Revolution With the collapse of the
Russian Czar and the installation of a democratic
govt., the U.S. now felt it could fully commit
to the war because the world must be made safe
for democracy. (March 1917)
War Resolution finally came about after the
sinking of several more U.S. ships.
Declaration of War video
59
  • With the belief that German submarine attacks
    have killed innocent people.
  • . . . Property can be paid for the lives of
    peaceful and innocent people cannot be. The
    present German submarine warfare against commerce
    is a warfare against mankind. from A
    Declaration of War
  • On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war
    against Germany.

60
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61
Chapter 23 World War I The student will
understand the general causes of WWI, and
the events and causes that led to U.S. entry into
the war. AL COS 11th grade 5  
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